Do you ever see people using windows xp?

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Meatlug
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Mad Vlad
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It's scary how widespread its usage is in the corporate and particularly public sector world.
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Reue
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(Original post by Mad Vlad)
It's scary how widespread its usage is in the corporate and particularly public sector world.
Funny you mention that; am currently working on an XP migration project for an organisation who really should not still be on an insecure system..
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Mad Vlad
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(Original post by Reue)
Funny you mention that; am currently working on an XP migration project for an organisation who really should not still be on an insecure system..
Yep haha. Been there and done that. Some organisations I've worked with as a consultant were on a ****ing lethal combination of Windows XP (some not even on SP3) IE6 and Office 2003 - the unholy trinity of security vulnerability. Ancient versions of Adobe Reader, Flash and Java thrown in to boot.

Other places that are VMing NT 4.0 systems to keep them running along with ancient mainframe hardware and 50 year old PLCs in SCADA systems that they've connected to the internet over IP.

Some things cannot be unseen...
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Loopy91
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(Original post by Reue)
Funny you mention that; am currently working on an XP migration project for an organisation who really should not still be on an insecure system..

(Original post by Mad Vlad)
Yep haha. Been there and done that. Some organisations I've worked with as a consultant were on a ****ing lethal combination of Windows XP (some not even on SP3) IE6 and Office 2003 - the unholy trinity of security vulnerability. Ancient versions of Adobe Reader, Flash and Java thrown in to boot.

Other places that are VMing NT 4.0 systems to keep them running along with ancient mainframe hardware and 50 year old PLCs in SCADA systems that they've connected to the internet over IP.

Some things cannot be unseen...
So what does it actually mean if Windows XP is 'unsupported'?
My dad, who works with computers told me that all it means is that if you ring up Microsoft and tell them that there's a problem with your PC, they won't help you, and because no one really does that it's not really an issue. He also said you can purchase anti-virus software etc to solve security problems, and the reason Windows are saying it's risky is to encourage people to buy newer OS models. He could be wrong though idk, he works with hardware rather than software if that means anything? :dontknow:
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Mad Vlad
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(Original post by Kyle1198)
So what does it actually mean if Windows XP is 'unsupported'?
My dad, who works with computers told me that all it means is that if you ring up Microsoft and tell them that there's a problem with your PC, they won't help you, and because no one really does that it's not really an issue. He also said you can purchase anti-virus software etc to solve security problems, and the reason Windows are saying it's risky is to encourage people to buy newer OS models. He could be wrong though idk, he works with hardware rather than software if that means anything? :dontknow:
I have some bad news... Your dad doesn't have a ****ing clue as to what he's talking about.

Support for an operating system comprises of patches and most importantly, security updates. With an unsupported OS, if a security vulnerability is discovered, the manufacturer of the OS will not patch it, leaving your machine extremely vulnerable to exploitation by an attacker.

Anti-virus is next to useless.
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Astrtricks
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(Original post by Kyle1198)
So what does it actually mean if Windows XP is 'unsupported'?
My dad, who works with computers told me that all it means is that if you ring up Microsoft and tell them that there's a problem with your PC, they won't help you, and because no one really does that it's not really an issue. He also said you can purchase anti-virus software etc to solve security problems, and the reason Windows are saying it's risky is to encourage people to buy newer OS models. He could be wrong though idk, he works with hardware rather than software if that means anything? :dontknow:
It means that they won't continue to update it to fix new security issues and weak points so that then the systems become more vulnerable. They'll also stop producing updates for hardware support but this isn't really an issue as newer computers will use a newer operating systems.

Most companies don't move away from a certain operating system because they'll use specific legacy programs which most likely aren't compatible with newer versions of windows so they have to upgrade meaning staff have to adjust and it costs a lot of money. Sometimes older hardware can't support more complex programs and operating systems so this just further adds to the cost and disruption.

Although a lot of systems using XP are no longer connected to the internet like systems use to control manufacturing machines so some people think there's no point. Although if they're connect to the internet the massive vulnerabilities that develop mean that using XP becomes risky quickly.
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Loopy91
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(Original post by Mad Vlad)
I have some bad news... Your dad doesn't have a ****ing clue as to what he's talking about.

Support for an operating system comprises of patches and most importantly, security updates. With an unsupported OS, if a security vulnerability is discovered, the manufacturer of the OS will not patch it, leaving your machine extremely vulnerable to exploitation by an attacker.

Anti-virus is next to useless.
(Original post by Astrtricks)
It means that they won't continue to update it to fix new security issues and weak points so that then the systems become more vulnerable. They'll also stop producing updates for hardware support but this isn't really an issue as newer computers will use a newer operating systems.

Most companies don't move away from a certain operating system because they'll use specific legacy programs which most likely aren't compatible with newer versions of windows so they have to upgrade meaning staff have to adjust and it costs a lot of money. Sometimes older hardware can't support more complex programs and operating systems so this just further adds to the cost and disruption.

Although a lot of systems using XP are no longer connected to the internet like systems use to control manufacturing machines so some people think there's no point. Although if they're connect to the internet the massive vulnerabilities that develop mean that using XP becomes risky quickly.
I'm sorry if this sounds really thick, but in what way can it become vulnerable to attackers? What exactly will they do? Will those attackers try and access bank/confidential details etc? So do these attackers find new methods of accessing people's information and OS manufacturers have to prevent those new methods happening?
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Meatlug
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(Original post by Kyle1198)
I'm sorry if this sounds really thick, but in what way can it become vulnerable to attackers? What exactly will they do? Will those attackers try and access bank/confidential details etc? So do these attackers find new methods of accessing people's information and OS manufacturers have to prevent those new methods happening?
I persume so, along with viruses that can f your computer.. fixes come in the form of service packs.

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Mad Vlad
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(Original post by Kyle1198)
I'm sorry if this sounds really thick, but in what way can it become vulnerable to attackers? What exactly will they do? Will those attackers try and access bank/confidential details etc? So do these attackers find new methods of accessing people's information and OS manufacturers have to prevent those new methods happening?
Depends on the vulnerability, but the best ones are where you exploit a weakness in a piece of software or the OS itself using a cleverly written bit of code that could be injected into a website for example, that defeats the security features built in to the OS or causes the software to behave in an unusual or undesirable way to allow you to remotely execute malicious code.

The nature of that malicious code depends entirely on the objectives of the actor. These can range from the installation of nuisance malware such as adware or other commodity malware to much more sinister data theft, data destruction, keystroke logging, viewing your webcam without you knowing, listening to your mic, or using your computer to conduct illegal activity, such as fraud, distribution and acquisition of child pornography or acts of espionage and terrorism.

With supported software, when it becomes apparent that there is a new vulnerability, vendors will typically quickly respond to patch the vulnerability. Unsupported software does not receive patches - instead the vendor will tell you that you need to upgrade.
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Mad Vlad
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(Original post by Meatlug)
I persume so, along with viruses that can f your computer.. fixes come in the form of service packs.

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Service packs are simply a large group of critical fixes in a convenient bundle. They're usually the cumulative updates of several months/years in one package. Microsoft tend to release patches every month on the second Tuesday of the month (Patch Tuesday), other vendors have release cycles that may be much longer - Oracle, for instance, typically has a quarterly patch cycle, but you'll sometimes get "out of band" security fixes in response to what I call "branded vulnerabilities" - headline grabbing CVE's that you have to patch ASAP.
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username1551801
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Unfortunately, yes, I've seen people come on our help forum with kernel crashes on Windows XP.
The best thing, is they refuse to upgrade because XP still "works".
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A5ko
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Every single day.
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k3ro
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i went into the natwest to have a bank statement printed last week. the woman was using windows xp and i had to wait about twenty minutes for the freakin thing to boot.
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