Atlantic Warrior
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Hey everyone,

First off, I'd like to thank everyone in advance for any help they can offer me. I really appreciate it.

I'm an American high school student heading to my senior year (12th grade) this fall and have browsed through The Student Room for a while now after nurturing an interest for British universities, although this is my first post on TSR.

I'm looking to go into the finance field in ideally investment banking after finishing uni (still getting used to the expression). Due to the burden of jumping the pond, my parents insist on going to a UK uni only if it is worth the hassle (ie. A really good uni). I have had my eyes on LSE and Oxford for a while and have few questions relating to admission and course. So, here goes.

I know that UK unis care less about my transcript and GPA and more on AP's and SAT / ACT's. I also knowthat aparently British students haven't recieved their A levl scores yet and so recieve codnitional acceptances.

My situation:
I have recieved my AP scores from this year just last week. My school doesnt let us take many AP classes so I self studied economics and government. I will take my next round next may recieving scores next July.
Current AP's:
AP Microecon- 5
AP Macroecon-5
AP Statistics- 5
AP U.S Government and Politics - 5
AP U.S History - 4
Next Year (classes I will be taking - I could possible give any of tests):
AP Calculus AB
AP World History
AP English Lit
AP Spanish
AP Biology
AP Psychology (possible self study)
AP Comparative Government (possible self study)
My current SAT score is 1980 although I plan to take it again, this time with more studying. It was after looking into UK unis I realized i wouldnt have a chance to give another SAT before Oxford's deadline so I will be taking the ACT aiming for atleast a 32 (Oxford's requirement)

Do I need to take SAT II's? (Wont be in time for Oxford) Currently I've only taken one U.S History with a 710

A few questions I have is what would be the best course to apply for at LSE for an investment banking career. It seemslike to me it would be Economics or Finance and I do inow that Econonomics and Polictics courses are extremely competitive which makes me lean towards finance. Would I have a significant disadvantage graduating with a finance degree vs. an economics one?

For Oxford, I was aiming for Economics or PPE....anything on that?
I will be taking the TSA Oxford (driving 10hrs one way for it).

Is it hard for Americans to get Finance jobs in the UK after graduation due to current immigration policies?
Do I have a realsitic chance with my stats?
Any advice that would help me?
Thank You very much
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Harry7777
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(Original post by Atlantic Warrior)
Hey everyone,

First off, I'd like to thank everyone in advance for any help they can offer me. I really appreciate it.

I'm an American high school student heading to my senior year (12th grade) this fall and have browsed through The Student Room for a while now after nurturing an interest for British universities, although this is my first post on TSR.

I'm looking to go into the finance field in ideally investment banking after finishing uni (still getting used to the expression). Due to the burden of jumping the pond, my parents insist on going to a UK uni only if it is worth the hassle (ie. A really good uni). I have had my eyes on LSE and Oxford for a while and have few questions relating to admission and course. So, here goes.

I know that UK unis care less about my transcript and GPA and more on AP's and SAT / ACT's. I also knowthat aparently British students haven't recieved their A levl scores yet and so recieve codnitional acceptances.

My situation:
I have recieved my AP scores from this year just last week. My school doesnt let us take many AP classes so I self studied economics and government. I will take my next round next may recieving scores next July.
Current AP's:
AP Microecon- 5
AP Macroecon-5
AP Statistics- 5
AP U.S Government and Politics - 5
AP U.S History - 4
Next Year (classes I will be taking - I could possible give any of tests):
AP Calculus AB
AP World History
AP English Lit
AP Spanish
AP Biology
AP Psychology (possible self study)
AP Comparative Government (possible self study)
My current SAT score is 1980 although I plan to take it again, this time with more studying. It was after looking into UK unis I realized i wouldnt have a chance to give another SAT before Oxford's deadline so I will be taking the ACT aiming for atleast a 32 (Oxford's requirement)

Do I need to take SAT II's? (Wont be in time for Oxford) Currently I've only taken one U.S History with a 710

A few questions I have is what would be the best course to apply for at LSE for an investment banking career. It seemslike to me it would be Economics or Finance and I do inow that Econonomics and Polictics courses are extremely competitive which makes me lean towards finance. Would I have a significant disadvantage graduating with a finance degree vs. an economics one?

For Oxford, I was aiming for Economics or PPE....anything on that?
I will be taking the TSA Oxford (driving 10hrs one way for it).

Is it hard for Americans to get Finance jobs in the UK after graduation due to current immigration policies?
Do I have a realsitic chance with my stats?
Any advice that would help me?
Thank You very much
LSE accept AP results . They don't seem interested in SAT I or SAT II

I understand why they don't consider SAT I as it too general not sure why they don't consider SAT II.

Also note someone from LSE visits North America to give a 2 hour talk and answers any questions. Google "LSE visits america" or email [email protected]

Note most international students apply for a Tier 4 Student Visa which allows the student to work in the UK during the Spring and Summer Break and also after the course is completed . Many students complete IB internships during the breaks.

Please see link below for AP requirements
http://www.lse.ac.uk/study/informati...uirements.aspx

UndergraduateThe American High School Diploma is not sufficient as an entry qualification to LSE on its own. Applicants should offer in addition at least five or four relevant two-semester subjects (one year) at Advanced Placement (AP) level with a minimum grade of 5 (depending on the varying standard offer for the course). At least three AP's should be taken in the same exam season. For programmes requiring A*AA or AAA at A level (see the relevant entry in the Undergraduate Prospectus) grade 5 in five two-semester AP courses is expected. For programmes requiring AAB at A level grade 5 in at least four two-semester AP courses is expected. When Maths is a required subject Calculus BC is expected. Economics Micro and Economics Macro are counted together as a single two-semester subject.Subjects classified as relevant are:
  • Art History and three Studio Art courses - only considered in exceptional cases, unlikely to be considered for most competitive programmes.
  • Biology
  • Calculus AB
  • Calculus BC - for programmes where Maths is a required subject, applicants should offer Calculus BC. If an applicant has both Calculus AB and BC, the grade for Calculus BC supersedes the AB result and will count as just one of the five required AP scores.
  • Chemistry
  • Chinese Language and Culture
  • English Language and Composition
  • English Literature and Composition
  • European History
  • French Language and Culture
  • German Language and Culture
  • Government and Politics: US and Comparative
  • Human Geography and Environmental Science
  • Italian Language and Culture
  • Japanese Language and Culture
  • Latin: Virgil
  • Macro and Microeconomics
  • Physics (B and C)
  • Spanish Language
  • Spanish Literature and culture
  • United States History
  • World History
Any subjects not listed above are considered as not suitable for entry.Please also note that SATs are not sufficient for entry. Alternatively, applicants offering the first year of an undergraduate degree from a US university would be eligible to apply and the School would require an overall GPA of 3.2 (on a 4.0 scale) or above 4.0 (on a 5.0 scale) or a minimum of 80 per cent overall.
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Atlantic Warrior
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Thanks for the information about LSE visits America; I think I could catch one of those sessions in mid September. Its wierd about the SAT II's, although it probably works in my favor. I was aware of the inforation posted on the LSE website about AP's. So, since my economics exams will be averaged into one exam, under the LSE metrics I technically have 3 5's and one 4. This is obviously under the four to five 5 scores they want. Does this mean that they reject me or say that if I yield two more 5's next year I can gain admission? The main problem I see with that is that US colleges want you to declare your uni May 1st whereas my scores will not arrive until July. That means I would have comited to an American uni before recieveing scores.

You mentioned the IB internships and the tier 4 visas. I had researched visas and informaton about immigration policies and to me landing internships while studying didnt seem to be the problem. The problem seems to be having to apply for a seperate work visa after those 3 years. They say you can work on your tier 4 for around 3-4 months aftr graduation, but that is because it counts as your break. I had heard that with UK policies companies have to sponsor work visas and prove that there not more competent domestic or EU candidates. I dont know how true this is and how it applies to IB. If it is true, it would seem like Americans would be at a severe disadvatage landing those jobs during that study to work visa transistion and afterwards. And because of the way IB works, I wouldnt be able to secure a par level job state side.

So, it really boils down to whether post graduation I will be able to secure that IB job?

Again thanks and all help is really appreciated.
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ak2015
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(Original post by Atlantic Warrior)
Thanks for the information about LSE visits America; I think I could catch one of those sessions in mid September. Its wierd about the SAT II's, although it probably works in my favor. I was aware of the inforation posted on the LSE website about AP's. So, since my economics exams will be averaged into one exam, under the LSE metrics I technically have 3 5's and one 4. This is obviously under the four to five 5 scores they want. Does this mean that they reject me or say that if I yield two more 5's next year I can gain admission? The main problem I see with that is that US colleges want you to declare your uni May 1st whereas my scores will not arrive until July. That means I would have comited to an American uni before recieveing scores.

You mentioned the IB internships and the tier 4 visas. I had researched visas and informaton about immigration policies and to me landing internships while studying didnt seem to be the problem. The problem seems to be having to apply for a seperate work visa after those 3 years. They say you can work on your tier 4 for around 3-4 months aftr graduation, but that is because it counts as your break. I had heard that with UK policies companies have to sponsor work visas and prove that there not more competent domestic or EU candidates. I dont know how true this is and how it applies to IB. If it is true, it would seem like Americans would be at a severe disadvatage landing those jobs during that study to work visa transistion and afterwards. And because of the way IB works, I wouldnt be able to secure a par level job state side.

So, it really boils down to whether post graduation I will be able to secure that IB job?

Again thanks and all help is really appreciated.
Hi! I'm an American undergrad that will be starting at LSE this September and I think so far you're in pretty good shape. Before I applied I had 5s in AP world history, us history, calculus bc, and french language. I applied for the mathematics and economics course and they gave me a conditional offer based on scoring 5s on AP macro and microeconomics. You already have strong AP scores and since you're taking so many more during senior year you're on track to meet their requirements. The deciding factor in your application will be your personal statement. It's very different from the common app essay that you'll be writing for American colleges, so I highly recommend that you read sample essays (there are many posted online). LSE doesn't interview like Oxford so they put a lot of emphasis on whether or not your essay shows genuine passion for your chosen subject. If you nail the personal statement, your chances of admission are pretty good. By the way, LSE doesn't care about your SAT scores at all, but Oxford does. Good luck, and if you have any more specific questions let me know!
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Harry7777
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(Original post by Atlantic Warrior)
Thanks for the information about LSE visits America; I think I could catch one of those sessions in mid September. Its wierd about the SAT II's, although it probably works in my favor. I was aware of the inforation posted on the LSE website about AP's. So, since my economics exams will be averaged into one exam, under the LSE metrics I technically have 3 5's and one 4. This is obviously under the four to five 5 scores they want. Does this mean that they reject me or say that if I yield two more 5's next year I can gain admission? The main problem I see with that is that US colleges want you to declare your uni May 1st whereas my scores will not arrive until July. That means I would have comited to an American uni before recieveing scores.

You mentioned the IB internships and the tier 4 visas. I had researched visas and informaton about immigration policies and to me landing internships while studying didnt seem to be the problem. The problem seems to be having to apply for a seperate work visa after those 3 years. They say you can work on your tier 4 for around 3-4 months aftr graduation, but that is because it counts as your break. I had heard that with UK policies companies have to sponsor work visas and prove that there not more competent domestic or EU candidates. I dont know how true this is and how it applies to IB. If it is true, it would seem like Americans would be at a severe disadvatage landing those jobs during that study to work visa transistion and afterwards. And because of the way IB works, I wouldnt be able to secure a par level job state side.

So, it really boils down to whether post graduation I will be able to secure that IB job?

Again thanks and all help is really appreciated.
Applications for 2016 entry will close January 15 2016. At that point you may not have completed your AP's which is not a problem. LSE will make 2 types of offers conditional or unconditional by March 31 2016. The unconditional offer is obvious. The conditional offer will specify you need for example 5 X AP with a grade 5 and maybe a specific subject requirement eg Calculus BC. You have until August 2016 to achieve these requirements at which point the offer becomes unconditional. Most offers are conditional, UK students do not get the A level results until August 2016.

Also if you receive 2 conditional offers you can only firm one and use the other as insurance. Some students do not make both offers and have to enter clearing or be forced into a gap year.

Conversion of the Tier 4 visa looks messy but 50% of LSE are international so they will have the same problem.

http://www.lse.ac.uk/intranet/studen...urstudies.aspx
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Atlantic Warrior
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(Original post by ak2015)
Hi! I'm an American undergrad that will be starting at LSE this September and I think so far you're in pretty good shape. Before I applied I had 5s in AP world history, us history, calculus bc, and french language. I applied for the mathematics and economics course and they gave me a conditional offer based on scoring 5s on AP macro and microeconomics. You already have strong AP scores and since you're taking so many more during senior year you're on track to meet their requirements. The deciding factor in your application will be your personal statement. It's very different from the common app essay that you'll be writing for American colleges, so I highly recommend that you read sample essays (there are many posted online). LSE doesn't interview like Oxford so they put a lot of emphasis on whether or not your essay shows genuine passion for your chosen subject. If you nail the personal statement, your chances of admission are pretty good. By the way, LSE doesn't care about your SAT scores at all, but Oxford does. Good luck, and if you have any more specific questions let me know!
Congratulations on acceptance into LSE first of all! I will definitely check out those samples and more information about the personal statement and how it will be different than American college essays.

So about your conditional offer, I'm assuming you also applied to a few American colleges in case you did not get the 5's in the AP Economics exams. Because American colleges expect you to affirm an offer by May 1st and AP scores are not released until July, how did you cope with that? Did you affirm an American college and then withdraw upon recieving your scores? Is that even allowed?

Also I had heard somewhere that Calculus BC is a requirement for all courses that require A Levels Maths, I tried to find more stuff on this on th LSE site, but it didnt make much sense. Do you know if Calc BC is required for courses like Finance or Economics.

Also seeing as you are an Amercan, do you plan on working in the UK after graduation? Do you know anything about the visa issue brought up?
Thanks a ton.
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Atlantic Warrior
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(Original post by Harry7777)
Applications for 2016 entry will close January 15 2016. At that point you may not have completed your AP's which is not a problem. LSE will make 2 types of offers conditional or unconditional by March 31 2016. The unconditional offer is obvious. The conditional offer will specify you need for example 5 X AP with a grade 5 and maybe a specific subject requirement eg Calculus BC. You have until August 2016 to achieve these requirements at which point the offer becomes unconditional. Most offers are conditional, UK students do not get the A level results until August 2016.

Also if you receive 2 conditional offers you can only firm one and use the other as insurance. Some students do not make both offers and have to enter clearing or be forced into a gap year.

Conversion of the Tier 4 visa looks messy but 50% of LSE are international so they will have the same problem.

http://www.lse.ac.uk/intranet/studen...urstudies.aspx
Firstly, do you know where you got that 50% figure from? Is that non UK or non EU?

What do you mean when you say by August 2016 that offer becomes unconditional? Can your offer type change between this time period?

Also by only being able to firm one, does that mean if I get conditIonal offers from say LSE and Oxford (whcih would be great!), I have to reject one upfront and only be able to work towards one taking the other comletely out of the equation?
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Harry7777
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(Original post by Atlantic Warrior)
Firstly, do you know where you got that 50% figure from? Is that non UK or non EU?

What do you mean when you say by August 2016 that offer becomes unconditional? Can your offer type change between this time period?

Also by only being able to firm one, does that mean if I get conditIonal offers from say LSE and Oxford (whcih would be great!), I have to reject one upfront and only be able to work towards one taking the other comletely out of the equation?
Regarding stats please see http://www.lse.ac.uk/intranet/LSESer...udents.aspxThe percentage for 2013/2014 for all students appears to be 6871 /9749 = 70% domiciled overseas . Note Post grad is higher than Undergrad. Not sure of how many are EEA or Swiss and hence do not require a work visa. The stats will be there somewhere.

In the UK the students receive the A Level results in August 2016 . All applications are made via UCAS for all universites in the UK. UCAS has access to these A level results and will notify students if they have meet the conditions and the offer is now unconditional. The offer becomes unconditional at this point . In the case of AP UCAS will not have access to these results , you probably have to email the results to LSE and they would make the offer unconditional.

If you get Oxford and LSE offers then you would firm your first choice. Your second choice say Oxford would be your "insurance" i.e your second choice. This is entered into the UCAS system online and cannot be changed(except in exceptional circumstances). If you don't your meet the conditions of your Firm choice(No 1 Choice) then your insurance(No 2 choice) becomes your only offer. If you don't meet both the offers you go into clearing(this ain't good). I don't think LSE or Oxford participate in clearing.

Personally I think this system is flawed and the American system is better as all offers are unconditional.

Normally your insurance is a lower offer hence the name insurance. For example my LSE offer could be A*AA(A levels) and my insurance could Exeter(ABB) if I get AAB . I would be forced to Accept Exeter as I did not meet the A*AA offer. Strange system but it seems to work.( A* = 90% plus A = 80 % plus)
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Atlantic Warrior
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(Original post by Harry7777)
Regarding stats please see http://www.lse.ac.uk/intranet/LSESer...udents.aspxThe percentage for 2013/2014 for all students appears to be 6871 /9749 = 70% domiciled overseas . Note Post grad is higher than Undergrad. Not sure of how many are EEA or Swiss and hence do not require a work visa. The stats will be there somewhere.

In the UK the students receive the A Level results in August 2016 . All applications are made via UCAS for all universites in the UK. UCAS has access to these A level results and will notify students if they have meet the conditions and the offer is now unconditional. The offer becomes unconditional at this point . In the case of AP UCAS will not have access to these results , you probably have to email the results to LSE and they would make the offer unconditional.

If you get Oxford and LSE offers then you would firm your first choice. Your second choice say Oxford would be your "insurance" i.e your second choice. This is entered into the UCAS system online and cannot be changed(except in exceptional circumstances). If you don't your meet the conditions of your Firm choice(No 1 Choice) then your insurance(No 2 choice) becomes your only offer. If you don't meet both the offers you go into clearing(this ain't good). I don't think LSE or Oxford participate in clearing.

Personally I think this system is flawed and the American system is better as all offers are unconditional.

Normally your insurance is a lower offer hence the name insurance. For example my LSE offer could be A*AA(A levels) and my insurance could Exeter(ABB) if I get AAB . I would be forced to Accept Exeter as I did not meet the A*AA offer. Strange system but it seems to work.( A* = 90% plus A = 80 % plus)
The stuff about the firm and insurance UCAS was really helpful.
Overall, I think the UK application system is better although the conditional offer aspect is cumbersome. (Sure both countries could learn from each other- saying that would be blasphemy in America though lol.)

Do you know of any American or other non EU citizens who graduated from a UK uni and got say an IB/finance or otherjob iside the UK?
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ak2015
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(Original post by Atlantic Warrior)
Congratulations on acceptance into LSE first of all! I will definitely check out those samples and more information about the personal statement and how it will be different than American college essays.

So about your conditional offer, I'm assuming you also applied to a few American colleges in case you did not get the 5's in the AP Economics exams. Because American colleges expect you to affirm an offer by May 1st and AP scores are not released until July, how did you cope with that? Did you affirm an American college and then withdraw upon recieving your scores? Is that even allowed?

Also I had heard somewhere that Calculus BC is a requirement for all courses that require A Levels Maths, I tried to find more stuff on this on th LSE site, but it didnt make much sense. Do you know if Calc BC is required for courses like Finance or Economics.

Also seeing as you are an Amercan, do you plan on working in the UK after graduation? Do you know anything about the visa issue brought up?
Thanks a ton.
I put down a deposit and enrolled at NYU before May 1st and had an unconditional offer from the University of Edinburgh which I used as my insurance, so I had two backups in case I didn't get 5s on my APs. I called NYU and explained the situation and they said I was allowed to enroll at their college and that when AP scores are released in July to call their admissions office and withdraw if I got the 5s.

Calc BC is a requirement and LSE will not even consider your application if you apply to any econ/finance related course without it. I just reread your original post and you said you'll be taking Calc AB. If you really want a shot at LSE you need to take the BC class, or if your school doesn't offer one then do an independent study with your math teacher or a tutor.

I'm probably going to continue on to graduate school in the UK and I'll probably work in the UK afterwords. I think at that point I would have to apply for a work visa.
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Atlantic Warrior
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(Original post by ak2015)
I put down a deposit and enrolled at NYU before May 1st and had an unconditional offer from the University of Edinburgh which I used as my insurance, so I had two backups in case I didn't get 5s on my APs. I called NYU and explained the situation and they said I was allowed to enroll at their college and that when AP scores are released in July to call their admissions office and withdraw if I got the 5s.

Calc BC is a requirement and LSE will not even consider your application if you apply to any econ/finance related course without it. I just reread your original post and you said you'll be taking Calc AB. If you really want a shot at LSE you need to take the BC class, or if your school doesn't offer one then do an independent study with your math teacher or a tutor.

I'm probably going to continue on to graduate school in the UK and I'll probably work in the UK afterwords. I think at that point I would have to apply for a work visa.
Thanks for clearing up the uni/college scenario with an American college put into the equation.

If thats the case concerning AP Calculus BC, I will have to self study or get a tutor for that then. Does anybody know if this is an LSE specific requirement or if this applies to other schools as wel like Oxford.

Can I ask what course you will be doing at LSE? And by graduate school, I'm assumming you mean a one year Masters program following undergrad?
Thanks
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ak2015
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(Original post by Atlantic Warrior)
Thanks for clearing up the uni/college scenario with an American college put into the equation.

If thats the case concerning AP Calculus BC, I will have to self study or get a tutor for that then. Does anybody know if this is an LSE specific requirement or if this applies to other schools as wel like Oxford.

Can I ask what course you will be doing at LSE? And by graduate school, I'm assumming you mean a one year Masters program following undergrad?
Thanks
AP Calc BC is also a requirement for Oxford's economics and management course. You can apply to their politics, philosophy, and economics course with AP Calc AB though. I'll be studying math and economics, and yeah I'll probably do a masters after undergrad.
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Harry7777
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(Original post by Atlantic Warrior)
The stuff about the firm and insurance UCAS was really helpful.
Overall, I think the UK application system is better although the conditional offer aspect is cumbersome. (Sure both countries could learn from each other- saying that would be blasphemy in America though lol.)

Do you know of any American or other non EU citizens who graduated from a UK uni and got say an IB/finance or otherjob iside the UK?
I can't help with the working visa post graduation, I start at LSE in September 2015 and gained entry via A Levels. I also sat SAT II but did not mentioned these on my application (CHEM 800 MATH II 750).LSE will place more emphasis on your AP Calculus results than Economics. As they explained at the LSE presentation they teach economics with a heavy emphasis on the Mathematical components. They will consider A level Maths more important then A level Economics.
Most Competitive Courses to gain entry at LSE are.

Economics
Law
Economics with Math
Accounting and Finance
PPE

Good Luck
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Atlantic Warrior
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(Original post by ak2015)
AP Calc BC is also a requirement for Oxford's economics and management course. You can apply to their politics, philosophy, and economics course with AP Calc AB though. I'll be studying math and economics, and yeah I'll probably do a masters after undergrad.
Okay, do you know where you found out/can find out which courses at Oxford require BC Calculus? I looked at Oxford's website and all I can find is a courses requirement for example is A*AA or AAA which doesnt tell me whether BC Calculus is required or if A Levels Maths is.

Masters after undergrad for a year sounds appealing and is probably good for job prospects as well, only con might be the expense.
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Atlantic Warrior
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(Original post by Harry7777)
I can't help with the working visa post graduation, I start at LSE in September 2015 and gained entry via A Levels. I also sat SAT II but did not mentioned these on my application (CHEM 800 MATH II 750).LSE will place more emphasis on your AP Calculus results than Economics. As they explained at the LSE presentation they teach economics with a heavy emphasis on the Mathematical components. They will consider A level Maths more important then A level Economics.
Most Competitive Courses to gain entry at LSE are.

Economics
Law
Economics with Math
Accounting and Finance
PPE

Good Luck
Thanks for the jnfo, the emphasis on Calculus is detrimental for me since AP BC Calculus is not offerred at my school (only AP AB Calculus is) and getting a 5 using a tutor or self study seems challenging.

I knew Economics and Economics and Finance as well as Law were very competitive. I know LSE PPE is relatively new so am sort of surprised it is one of the most competitive ones at the School.
Thanks
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ak2015
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(Original post by Atlantic Warrior)
Okay, do you know where you found out/can find out which courses at Oxford require BC Calculus? I looked at Oxford's website and all I can find is a courses requirement for example is A*AA or AAA which doesnt tell me whether BC Calculus is required or if A Levels Maths is.

Masters after undergrad for a year sounds appealing and is probably good for job prospects as well, only con might be the expense.
http://www.ox.ac.uk/admissions/under...and-management

http://www.ox.ac.uk/admissions/under...-and-economics

Click the tab that says requirements and read everything written, it tells you what you need to know. Whenever it says that A Level Maths is required, for Americans the equivalent is Calc BC. If it says that AS-Level Maths is required, then the equivalent would be Calc AB. Btw tuition in the UK is actually a lot more affordable than in the US.
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Hi Atlantic Warrior!

I'm just curious as to why you wish to study at a British university and go into finance, when there is a ton of great colleges in the United States that will allow you to get into an investment bank too?
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All the other posts are on point. Just want to point out that unless you are applying to St. Andrews or Cambridge (if you change your mind to Oxford, can't apply to both), ANY information about your classes and GPA are irrelevant-waste of time to include it in your UCAS application. Also, remember that APs have more emphasis than SATs.
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Atlantic Warrior
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(Original post by maxnl)
Hi Atlantic Warrior!

I'm just curious as to why you wish to study at a British university and go into finance, when there is a ton of great colleges in the United States that will allow you to get into an investment bank too?
Maxnl, thats a great question and it boils down to a few reasons.
Firstly, in the United States, Unis are obsessed with how well you did in say woodworking, chemistry, etc even if you intend to major in Finance. This is largely due to the "holistic" admissions process in the U.S. (this holistic approach was actually initially created primarily to keep Jews out of Harvard because they would ace the exams - no joke). This coupled with extracurriluras and volunteering (which btw I'm completely fine in with nearly 500hrs volunteering and great extracurriculars). My main problem is that classes like chem or woodworking (which you uave to take) factor into my GPA, the most important part of the admission process. This means my GPA is much lower than my scores in my respective interests. This further means I do not have a real shot in places like the I vies and my best shot would be at a semi target for IB/finance. On the other hand, the UK process works much more to my advantage (in my opinion more fairly) and might give me a shot at places like Oxbridge, LSE or Warwick/UCL/ICL - all targets for IB in London.

Ive also lived in England for about a year and my cousin is British and recommended me to UK unis (He did accounting btw).

If I went onto uni in the US , theres a real chance i would go jnto the excruciating study of medicine (8yrs uni plus residency plus specializatin plus im more interested in finance )
finance btw is massively geared toward what uni you went to.

So...yeah. Although recent immigration policies by Home Secretary Theresa May (just today news broke concerning how non EU students wont be able to work during studies (no internships) and would have to leave immediately back to their native country before applying for a work visaa - which you already have to get a company sponsor for whobhas to prove you are more capable than any UK or EU candiate)....are sort of making me rethink applying to UK unis.
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(Original post by Atlantic Warrior)
Maxnl, thats a great question and it boils down to a few reasons.
Firstly, in the United States, Unis are obsessed with how well you did in say woodworking, chemistry, etc even if you intend to major in Finance. This is largely due to the "holistic" admissions process in the U.S. (this holistic approach was actually initially created primarily to keep Jews out of Harvard because they would ace the exams - no joke). This coupled with extracurriluras and volunteering (which btw I'm completely fine in with nearly 500hrs volunteering and great extracurriculars). My main problem is that classes like chem or woodworking (which you uave to take) factor into my GPA, the most important part of the admission process. This means my GPA is much lower than my scores in my respective interests. This further means I do not have a real shot in places like the I vies and my best shot would be at a semi target for IB/finance. On the other hand, the UK process works much more to my advantage (in my opinion more fairly) and might give me a shot at places like Oxbridge, LSE or Warwick/UCL/ICL - all targets for IB in London.

Ive also lived in England for about a year and my cousin is British and recommended me to UK unis (He did accounting btw).

If I went onto uni in the US , theres a real chance i would go jnto the excruciating study of medicine (8yrs uni plus residency plus specializatin plus im more interested in finance )
finance btw is massively geared toward what uni you went to.

So...yeah. Although recent immigration policies by Home Secretary Theresa May (just today news broke concerning how non EU students wont be able to work during studies (no internships) and would have to leave immediately back to their native country before applying for a work visaa - which you already have to get a company sponsor for whobhas to prove you are more capable than any UK or EU candiate)....are sort of making me rethink applying to UK unis.
Don't let the last bit about the new visa regulations affect your decision. That is for people studying at further education institutes and not higher education institutes which is what a uni is.
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