Is there any degree that combines computer science and engineering? Watch

Reggaeterr
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I want to not only be able to program and learn C++ coding and develop software, but I would also like to be able to fix computers and make them and find out their problems etc.

Is there any degree that mixes both of those things so I can have a choice of either going into a development job or engineering job?
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lllllllllll
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Hey if it's a hobby then you could do one in your free time
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Computer Geek
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These degrees: https://www.imperial.ac.uk/study/ug/...ent/computing/ or this degree: http://www.bristol.ac.uk/study/under...ec-electronic/

Bear in mind, those courses are some of the best in the country and have super high entry requirements. Your maths ability will need to be outstanding.
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donutellme
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Electrical engineering? They cover some software, as well as the nitty gritty hardware side.
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Princepieman
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(Original post by Reggaeterr)
I want to not only be able to program and learn C++ coding and develop software, but I would also like to be able to fix computers and make them and find out their problems etc.

Is there any degree that mixes both of those things so I can have a choice of either going into a development job or engineering job?
Computer Systems Engineering or Computer Science and Electronics

Both are a great mix of CS and engineering.

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bigboateng
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Yes it's called Engineering. Engineering already have programming in it in most of the languages just like CS. I was deciding between CS and engineering but I chose engineering because I can already program. You can also choose modules in engineering which have programming involved such as control theory related modules. (I applied for aerospace btw, I plan on programming rockets / autopilot systems)


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Princepieman
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(Original post by bigboateng)
Yes it's called Engineering. Engineering already have programming in it in most of the languages just like CS. I was deciding between CS and engineering but I chose engineering because I can already program. You can also choose modules in engineering which have programming involved such as control theory related modules. (I applied for aerospace btw, I plan on programming rockets / autopilot systems)


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CS isn't about programming you fud.

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bigboateng
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(Original post by Princepieman)
CS isn't about programming you fud.

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Mainly yes. If you're talking about maths too yes engineering has maths in it. The maths you do in CS is discrete mathematics and linear algebra all of which is also done in engineering. There's other stuff like big o notation and optimisation, databases, etc but all of that is not needed/can be self taught. You can take advanced programming modules in engineering which will touch on the hard software stuff.


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Princepieman
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(Original post by bigboateng)
Mainly yes. If you're talking about maths too yes engineering has maths in it. The maths you do in CS is discrete mathematics and linear algebra all of which is also done in engineering. There's other stuff like big o notation and optimisation, databases, etc but all of that is not needed/can be self taught. You can take advanced programming modules in engineering which will touch on the hard software stuff.


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I don't think you understand what CS is.

CS is about the theoretical study of computation: yes maths is involved, but so is AI, Bio-Computing, Brain-Computer Interfaces, etc. You really can't boil it down to 'advanced programming'.

If OP wants a mix of practical and theoretical elements electrical engineering would be good idea - obviously - but it isn't Computer Science.



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uberteknik
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Electronic Engineering or Electrical and Electronic Engineering.
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bigboateng
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(Original post by Princepieman)

CS is about the theoretical study of computation: yes maths is involved, but so is AI, Bio-Computing, Brain-Computer Interfaces, etc. You really can't boil it down to 'advanced programming'.

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All of which you can self learn from reading books if you really want to know it. Tone of YouTube lectures too, the only other thing you'll require is a computer.

Edit: btw I'm not saying no one should do CS, but if you have experience in programming already and are able to learn new concepts quickly, then engineering is better because you learn more maths, and just hands on stuff. I was personally attracted to the maths and the idea of programming real life systems like planes, an opportunity which I wouldn't get if I did CS
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Princepieman
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(Original post by bigboateng)
All of which you can self learn from reading books if you really want to know it. Tone of YouTube lectures too, the only other thing you'll require is a computer.


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The same goes for engineering.

I made the choice of going for CS you decided against it. We can agree to disagree at this point.

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bigboateng
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(Original post by Princepieman)
The same goes for engineering.

I made the choice of going for CS you decided against it. We can agree to disagree at this point.

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Okay. But I didn't really decide against CS, I just thought I'd get bored in uni because I can go through content fast especially if it's programming related. Where as eng has different modules unrelated so I will be challenged. Actually I'm currently writing a backend server for an app I'm working on, so I'm still interested in CS just not interested in paying 9k for it


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Princepieman
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(Original post by bigboateng)
Okay. But I didn't really decide against CS, I just thought I'd get bored in uni because I can go through content fast especially if it's programming related. Where as eng has different modules unrelated so I will be challenged. Actually I'm currently writing a backend server for an app I'm working on, so I'm still interested in CS just not interested in paying 9k for it


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OK, did you even look at the modules for CS?

Anyway, I've lost interest.

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bigboateng
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(Original post by Princepieman)
OK, did you even look at the modules for CS?

Anyway, I've lost interest.

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Yep thoroughly,

Don't wanna spam OP's post haha. tbh though, CS probably has more job prospects and high pay than your average engineer so that's something to take into consideration OP. Most engineering jobs involves sitting in a cubicle and a computer using excel.


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Jooooshy
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(Original post by bigboateng)
Edit: btw I'm not saying no one should do CS, but if you have experience in programming already and are able to learn new concepts quickly, then engineering is better because you learn more maths, and just hands on stuff. I was personally attracted to the maths and the idea of programming real life systems like planes, an opportunity which I wouldn't get if I did CS
If you pick up new concepts quickly, then apply to a good university where they'll be thrown at you faster than you can learn them.

What do you think software engineers at say BAE or Thales do? Make tea? Those options are still open to anyone that does CS.
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bigboateng
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(Original post by Jooooshy)
If you pick up new concepts quickly, then apply to a good university where they'll be thrown at you faster than you can learn them.

What do you think software engineers at say BAE or Thales do? Make tea? Those options are still open to anyone that does CS.

The software engineers still work with actual engineers, in the context of BAE, it's will be mechanical/aerospace engineers. Yes software engineers know all about programming but it's engineers who learn control theory and know how to apply it to systems, the software engineers role will be to transport that into an actual code, and also they know more about programming structures and efficiency than the general engineer. I just looked at the software engineering modules for Imperial College and no where does it mention Control theory. Also engineers, not just software engineers can apply to software engineer positions. So even though there are people who actually took the the software engineering degree you will find that most are mechanical engineers/maths graduates who are just good at making software. It's easier for an employer to hire an engineer who can code than hire a programmer who need to learn more engineering principles.
Btw OP said CS


Update: I personally plan on becoming a software engineer in aerospace industry, I would like to work on rockets and their guidance algorithms. CS/ software engineering is not the best route, because you can code fine, but what you gonna code? You'd know nothing about rockets and how they work. However in the aerospace degree, not only will you learn about the rocket,s there's also programming modules. So knowing that I want to become a programmer, I'll just read more about programming and CS theory in my spare time, that's what I do

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