psychotherapy, psychiatrist, psychologist, counsellor

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evedudleyx
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Hi,

I am a mature student, looking to go back into education in the health or law sector.

I have come across a course at my local college which is a level 3 certificate in counselling for 1 year (part time evening) and then follows on for another 2 year part time evening level 4 diploma in therapeutic counselling. This is fantastic for me as it gives me the flexibility to work full time still!

After researching I have become concerned that 'counsellors' arent regulated.. therefore, I wouldnt want to undergo 3 years training for no recognition. (My ultimate goal is to set up my own practice).

I have looked into university also and studying an access to HE in law or psychotherapy. I am slightly confused between psychotherapy, psychiatrist, psychologist, counsellor.
Well mainly psychotherapist and counsellor.

I have researched they are different but also read a counsellor and psychotherapist are the same? But it seems confusing as to why a psychotherapist or psychologist would study in university for years if they earnt the same title as someone who studies 1 evening a week in therapeutic counselling?

Could somebody please explain the job difference and salary difference? I am really debating uni but dont see the point if i can continue to work full time and study counselling to achieve the same end term goal of going self employed and helping people.

Thanks, Eve xx
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Pathway
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(Original post by evedudleyx)
Hi,I am a mature student, looking to go back into education in the health or law sector.I have come across a course at my local college which is a level 3 certificate in counselling for 1 year (part time evening) and then follows on for another 2 year part time evening level 4 diploma in therapeutic counselling. This is fantastic for me as it gives me the flexibility to work full time still!After researching I have become concerned that 'counsellors' arent regulated.. therefore, I wouldnt want to undergo 3 years training for no recognition. (My ultimate goal is to set up my own practice).I have looked into university also and studying an access to HE in law or psychotherapy. I am slightly confused between psychotherapy, psychiatrist, psychologist, counsellor.Well mainly psychotherapist and counsellor.I have researched they are different but also read a counsellor and psychotherapist are the same? But it seems confusing as to why a psychotherapist or psychologist would study in university for years if they earnt the same title as someone who studies 1 evening a week in therapeutic counselling?Could somebody please explain the job difference and salary difference? I am really debating uni but dont see the point if i can continue to work full time and study counselling to achieve the same end term goal of going self employed and helping people.Thanks, Eve xx
From what I understand the difference between a psychotherapist and a counsellor is that a psychotherapist tends to work with patients on more long-term problems and tends to employ techniques like CBT and EMDR, counsellors tend to just let you talk about your feelings. However, some people use the terms interchangeably.

Psychiatrists are people who have undergone medical training and then specialised in psychiatry. They're able to give medication and tend to oversee patients care. They also tend to work in secondary (e.g. CMHT) or tertiary care (inpatient units). They're also able to diagnose people with things (counsellors and psychotherapists aren't really able to do this).
Psychologists can be a variety of different things. You can be a counselling psychologist - so after you have your undergraduate degree in psychology/masters conversion which is accredited by the British Psychological Society (BPS) you are then able to go to get a doctorate in counselling. They're quite similar to counsellors in that sense but deal with more severe/complex things. Clinical psychologists often work in multidisciplinary teams (so alongside social workers, psychiatrists, community psychiatric nurses, etc.) within inpatient units and other community teams (e.g. EIIPS and CMHT/CAMHS), can provide therapy, oversee care and diagnose people. Like counselling psychologists they also need either a undergraduate degree in psychology/masters conversion which is accredited by BPS you are then able to go to get a doctorate in clinical psychology (DClinPsy). There are also loads of other specific psychologists around (e.g. health, educational, forensic, occupational, etc.).

Sorry if this doesn't clear things up, but I hope it helps.
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K-Bear
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(Original post by Pathway)
From what I understand the difference between a psychotherapist and a counsellor is that a psychotherapist tends to work with patients on more long-term problems and tends to employ techniques like CBT and EMDR, counsellors tend to just let you talk about your feelings. However, some people use the terms interchangeably.

Psychiatrists are people who have undergone medical training and then specialised in psychiatry. They're able to give medication and tend to oversee patients care. They also tend to work in secondary (e.g. CMHT) or tertiary care (inpatient units). They're also able to diagnose people with things (counsellors and psychotherapists aren't really able to do this).
Psychologists can be a variety of different things. You can be a counselling psychologist - so after you have your undergraduate degree in psychology/masters conversion which is accredited by the British Psychological Society (BPS) you are then able to go to get a doctorate in counselling. They're quite similar to counsellors in that sense but deal with more severe/complex things. Clinical psychologists often work in multidisciplinary teams (so alongside social workers, psychiatrists, community psychiatric nurses, etc.) within inpatient units and other community teams (e.g. EIIPS and CMHT/CAMHS), can provide therapy, oversee care and diagnose people. Like counselling psychologists they also need either a undergraduate degree in psychology/masters conversion which is accredited by BPS you are then able to go to get a doctorate in clinical psychology (DClinPsy). There are also loads of other specific psychologists around (e.g. health, educational, forensic, occupational, etc.).

Sorry if this doesn't clear things up, but I hope it helps.
Good reply above! I would also add that psychologist and psychiatrist are protected titles and you cannot call yourself either without the appropriate qualifications. Psychotherapist and counsellor are not but they can be registered or accredicated with certain professional bodies, which is helpful for prospective clients to know that you have had appropriate training and supervision to a specified standard. These would be for example BACP (British Association for Counselling and Psychotherapy) or BABCP (British Association for Behavioural and Cognitive Psychotherapy) but there are more!
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Leelo.
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Have a look at your local careers website. 'Careers wales' website has a section dedicated to 'job search' and planning which outlines what roles will be acessible with your current skills and if also there is any formal qualifications needed.
Hope that helps.
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Sinatrafan
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Pathway is absolutely right and has laid the various roles out very nicely. In terms of my own quick summary I would say;

Counsellor - Talking based therapy for mild mental health issues with middle class patients who can afford regular sessions.Typically counselling isn't offered on the NHS so only those willing to pay privately will benefit.

Psychiatrist - Head of the mental health team. Medical doctor. Diagnose, treat (with drugs and ECT in rare cases) and generally lead mental health services often with management roles. They also have a responsibility to look out for the patient's physical health and exclude organic causes of mental illness.

Clinical psychologists - Work alongside the psychiatrists/nurses/social workers if your MDT is lucky enough to have the budget for one. They will deliver therapies and undertake a lot of assessment (e.g. cognitive testing). They also have roles in education and research as part of their work.

Psychotherapy can basically be undertaken by anyone but it is typically the reserve (or at least should be) of clinical/forensic psychologists and psychiatrists. Psychiatrists are all trained in psychotherapy but rarely deliver it day to day.

As mentioned counselling isn't a protected title and it is largely a "talking based therapeutic approach". It is an extremely saturated market with a varying quality of practitioners. It is very difficult to get a good client base going, at least one large enough to make a full time job with a decent wage out of it.

Psychology is also a very saturated and competitive market and I wouldn't advise pursuing it, especially not as a mature student. It will likely take at least 10-12 years to become fully qualified and even then many people never get on the training doctorates due to the competition. Jobs on the other end are becoming increasingly under pressured too what with NHS cutbacks. There are diminishing salaries and a diminishing number of jobs.

Psychiatry is in the best shape job wise at the moment and they are literally crying out for medical graduates to train in psychiatry (it's an unpopular career choice for medics). Psychiatrists as the head of the mental health team hold a very protected position when it comes to cuts etc. But obviously as it requires a medical background it isn't a viable option for many people interested in this field.

In terms of a rough salary guide I would say;

Psychiatry (consultant level) - £75,000-£120,000
Clinical psychology et al - £45,000-£65,000
Counselling - £0-£30,000 (I imagine it varies massively though)
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blitzchika
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(Original post by Sinatrafan)
Pathway is absolutely right and has laid the various roles out very nicely. In terms of my own quick summary I would say;

Counsellor - Talking based therapy for mild mental health issues with middle class patients who can afford regular sessions.Typically counselling isn't offered on the NHS so only those willing to pay privately will benefit.

Psychiatrist - Head of the mental health team. Medical doctor. Diagnose, treat (with drugs and ECT in rare cases) and generally lead mental health services often with management roles. They also have a responsibility to look out for the patient's physical health and exclude organic causes of mental illness.

Clinical psychologists - Work alongside the psychiatrists/nurses/social workers if your MDT is lucky enough to have the budget for one. They will deliver therapies and undertake a lot of assessment (e.g. cognitive testing). They also have roles in education and research as part of their work.

Psychotherapy can basically be undertaken by anyone but it is typically the reserve (or at least should be) of clinical/forensic psychologists and psychiatrists. Psychiatrists are all trained in psychotherapy but rarely deliver it day to day.

As mentioned counselling isn't a protected title and it is largely a "talking based therapeutic approach". It is an extremely saturated market with a varying quality of practitioners. It is very difficult to get a good client base going, at least one large enough to make a full time job with a decent wage out of it.

Psychology is also a very saturated and competitive market and I wouldn't advise pursuing it, especially not as a mature student. It will likely take at least 10-12 years to become fully qualified and even then many people never get on the training doctorates due to the competition. Jobs on the other end are becoming increasingly under pressured too what with NHS cutbacks. There are diminishing salaries and a diminishing number of jobs.

Psychiatry is in the best shape job wise at the moment and they are literally crying out for medical graduates to train in psychiatry (it's an unpopular career choice for medics). Psychiatrists as the head of the mental health team hold a very protected position when it comes to cuts etc. But obviously as it requires a medical background it isn't a viable option for many people interested in this field.

In terms of a rough salary guide I would say;

Psychiatry (consultant level) - £75,000-£120,000
Clinical psychology et al - £45,000-£65,000
Counselling - £0-£30,000 (I imagine it varies massively though)
Do you know whether becoming a health or counselling psychologist is as competitive as becoming a clinical psychologist?
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username1783907
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A psychoanalytic psychotherapist is a specific title in the UK. The training is a PHD and professional qualification course run by the Tavistock, sponsored by the NHS. Psychoanalysis comes from Freud, and then you have different schools of thought Freud/Jung/Klein etc. This is regulated as you need to complete the course before you can use the title.

http://tavistockandportman.uk
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MissDetermined
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Imo I would think that there are more counselors than clinical psychologists purely because the latter is more competitive to get into and takes a lot longer. My friend spent 3 years doing undergrad psychology and then a masters in clinical psychology. She had to have relevant work experience before being accepted onto the masters so took a gap year between her undergrad and masters. Now she is a Psychologist Assistant with the NHS and is clocking up some experience whilst applying for the doctorate (she is going to apply every year until accepted as competition is fierce).
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