Hey there! Sign in to join this conversationNew here? Join for free
x Turn on thread page Beta
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    I am quite interested in law and would like to see what it really is like? Can someone who is studying law tell me what it is like? is there any books that i can read to see if i like it? I've heard from a lot of people that law is REALLy boring, but it seems to be the contrary from what i've seen.

    Also, im doing lit in eng at a level and the rest are science/maths subjects, do u think the uni's will think im not "arts" enough for law? anyone tried with a similar combination?

    I'd also want to know how to become a barrister or solicitor after getin a law degree
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by dude_)
    I am quite interested in law and would like to see what it really is like? Can someone who is studying law tell me what it is like? is there any books that i can read to see if i like it? I've heard from a lot of people that law is REALLy boring, but it seems to be the contrary from what i've seen.

    Also, im doing lit in eng at a level and the rest are science/maths subjects, do u think the uni's will think im not "arts" enough for law? anyone tried with a similar combination?

    I'd also want to know how to become a barrister or solicitor after getin a law degree
    science/maths subjects are great, and the best universities prefer more concrete subjects. Once you have done your law degree, you have to sepnd another year/two years, doing an LPC (Law Practise Course) this costs a fortune, estimating roughly £9000.
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    Try reading the Times Legal Supplement on a Tuesday and looking at some A Level Law textbooks to give you an idea of the areas that you'd be studying. But I actually did and got an A in A Level Law, and still lots of the degree stuff came as a shock when I started here! There is a lot of material to cover, but exams and revision aside I enjoy it!
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Bhaal85)
    science/maths subjects are great, and the best universities prefer more concrete subjects. Once you have done your law degree, you have to sepnd another year/two years, doing an LPC (Law Practise Course) this costs a fortune, estimating roughly £9000.
    Many people who go through the LPC are sponsored by a firm with which they have a training contract. those who cannot afford this amount & cannot find a training contract either get heavily into debt and risk not being able to find a training contract after the LPC, or they decide against a career in Law, there is a wide range of possibilities. I'm doing Law next year, not entirely sure what to expect. when I think back to what Ive done in the past, work is work, its rarely enjoyable and almsot always an effort. what makes it worthwhile is your desire to do it and succeed, whether for its own sake or whether for exam results etc.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    I remember Sharky and George. That was such a long time ago.
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    Basically, law is a great subject for those that are generally interested in how the legal system works. However, law is really boring for people that only want to go into law for the money. My advise is not even to consider law as a career if you are most worried about the money. You could read a few books to see if you are genuinely interested in law:

    Learning the Law by Glanville Williams;

    Landmarks in the Law by Lord Denning;

    The Law Machine,

    and any other introductory books to law.

    Your A-levels are fine for admission for law because the unis do not specify any particular A-Levels. However, I do think that an essay based subject (i.e. history or english) and maths are highly regarded by the best universities. Your sciences are also very good because they show strong analytical skills (particularly chemistry if you do it) and they require logical thinking (somethings that is a prerequesite if you wish to enter the legal world).

    Something that may interest you is Intellectual Property law, which is the branch of law governing actions in the IT/Chemical/Pharmaceutical/Sciency/
    patent world. Law firms especially like people to enter IP who have a background in science, so your science A-Levels are certainly useful. Maybe you could 'read-up' on a couple of these subjects and see if they interest you. If so, great.

    I hope I have helped you!
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by samd294)
    Many people who go through the LPC are sponsored by a firm with which they have a training contract. those who cannot afford this amount & cannot find a training contract either get heavily into debt and risk not being able to find a training contract after the LPC, or they decide against a career in Law, there is a wide range of possibilities. I'm doing Law next year, not entirely sure what to expect. when I think back to what Ive done in the past, work is work, its rarely enjoyable and almsot always an effort. what makes it worthwhile is your desire to do it and succeed, whether for its own sake or whether for exam results etc.
    Not really, very few students are sponsored, and when they do are required to stay with the sponsoring firm for a fixed period of time and with a basic pay.
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Bhaal85)
    Not really, very few students are sponsored, and when they do are required to stay with the sponsoring firm for a fixed period of time and with a basic pay.
    £28.5k - £32k is reasonable pay for a trainee. There are plenty of major training contracts one can secure that will pay for all fees and give you free cash throughout your CPE/ LPC..
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    So does anyone know who/what types of firm offer LPC sponsorship? I thought most people who secured a training contract in a commercial firm before starting their LPC generally acquired funding for their tuition fees.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by muncrun)
    So does anyone know who/what types of firm offer LPC sponsorship? I thought most people who secured a training contract in a commercial firm before starting their LPC generally acquired funding for their tuition fees.
    The vast majority if the medium to large firms, and all of the mc firms pay your fees for the LPC, and also pay living expenses. If you were maybe looking at working in a high street provincial firm, you would probably have to pay your fees. Its a meritocracy. Best students get best contracts get best deal. Ironically its those who will earn the most in the future that will probably get the best deal, and those that will probably earn the least who will have the most to pay out.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by samd294)
    The vast majority if the medium to large firms, and all of the mc firms pay your fees for the LPC, and also pay living expenses. If you were maybe looking at working in a high street provincial firm, you would probably have to pay your fees. Its a meritocracy. Best students get best contracts get best deal. Ironically its those who will earn the most in the future that will probably get the best deal, and those that will probably earn the least who will have the most to pay out.
    The best students? is this really the case?
    I did some work shadowing a barrister and he told me a few (mostly negative) things about how the system actually works- he was either being extremley honest or very cynical. He said that even with the best grades you won't get anywhere if you don't have contacts.. as often that is how people get training/tenancy in the legal field. So if this really is the case then people (I'm guessing mainly upper class) who have had the advantage of building these contacts at public school/Oxbridge/family connections will be the ones who recieve funding, meaning that those who have to fund themselves also have to work a secound job, and consequently won't do as well in their legal career. This information could be wrong.. as I said it's just one person who I spoke to who had this view.. but some of the posts I've read on this forum seem to back it up.
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Elle)
    The best students? is this really the case?
    I did some work shadowing a barrister and he told me a few (mostly negative) things about how the system actually works- he was either being extremley honest or very cynical. He said that even with the best grades you won't get anywhere if you don't have contacts.. as often that is how people get training/tenancy in the legal field. So if this really is the case then people (I'm guessing mainly upper class) who have had the advantage of building these contacts at public school/Oxbridge/family connections will be the ones who recieve funding, meaning that those who have to fund themselves also have to work a secound job, and consequently won't do as well in their legal career. This information could be wrong.. as I said it's just one person who I spoke to who had this view.. but some of the posts I've read on this forum seem to back it up.
    Wrong. I have no public school/ family connections, went to Newcastle University not Oxford, got a 2:1, have all As at A-Level and have a TC at a major US law firm who are paying all my fees and giving me fat wads of cash during CPE and LPC.

    Getting pupillage is, I dare say, more difficult though.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Elle)
    The best students? is this really the case?
    I did some work shadowing a barrister and he told me a few (mostly negative) things about how the system actually works- he was either being extremley honest or very cynical. He said that even with the best grades you won't get anywhere if you don't have contacts.. as often that is how people get training/tenancy in the legal field. So if this really is the case then people (I'm guessing mainly upper class) who have had the advantage of building these contacts at public school/Oxbridge/family connections will be the ones who recieve funding, meaning that those who have to fund themselves also have to work a secound job, and consequently won't do as well in their legal career. This information could be wrong.. as I said it's just one person who I spoke to who had this view.. but some of the posts I've read on this forum seem to back it up.
    This is undoubtedly the case for the bar, im pretty sure its no longer the case with solicitors
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    I would be very grateful if anyone could answer me this question. How easy is it to get well paid training contracts in big firms (not necessarily MC, as I am not going to Oxbridge and daddy isnt a lawyer so I'd have no chance anyway, but other big international/national firms) in other big cities in the UK (in particular Manchester and Leeds)? I'll be going to KCL to do law so I'm just worried that all the law fairs will be attended by firms who only want students who want to work in London. Are they flexible?

    I'm asking because if me and my girlfriend are still together after university, we've agreed we're going to live together, or at least in the same city (she may come to live in London, or she may not), so I need to know the geographical flexibility of top law firms who pay well.
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by kingslaw)
    I would be very grateful if anyone could answer me this question. How easy is it to get well paid training contracts in big firms (not necessarily MC, as I am not going to Oxbridge and daddy isnt a lawyer so I'd have no chance anyway, but other big international/national firms) in other big cities in the UK (in particular Manchester and Leeds)? I'll be going to KCL to do law so I'm just worried that all the law fairs will be attended by firms who only want students who want to work in London. Are they flexible?

    I'm asking because if me and my girlfriend are still together after university, we've agreed we're going to live together, or at least in the same city (she may come to live in London, or she may not), so I need to know the geographical flexibility of top law firms who pay well.
    Note: I am moderately drunk while writing this so please excuse anygrammatical/ spelling mistakes. :P

    How easy is it to get paid TCs in big firms? Not overly difficult if you have good grades and attended a good uni (KCL is excellent). A 2:1 and AAA/AAB will stand you in good stead. Providing you have decent extra-curriculars, you will get interviews at large/ medium City firms. If you want to work in the provinces, note that most of the major firms will offer TCs that are well paid and also pay for course fees/ maintenance e.g. Dickinson Dees, Eversheds, Burges Salmon, Addleshaw Goddard, Wragges, DLA etc. You shouldn't have any trouble if you have the grades.

    Oh, also you should note that there is relatively little Oxbridge bias in the MC, with the exception of Slaughters.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    i am only studying eng and mat at a level and the rest is at AS, do u think i have a good chance of getting into a good uni for law? what sort of grades to they want?

    Also, how do u become a barrister or solicitor? do u have to become a solicitor first and then go on to become a barrister? I've heard of some exam u hav to do to become a barrister, what is it?

    thanks for everyone's reply, it's been very helpful.
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by dude_)
    i am only studying eng and mat at a level and the rest is at AS, do u think i have a good chance of getting into a good uni for law? what sort of grades to they want?

    Also, how do u become a barrister or solicitor? do u have to become a solicitor first and then go on to become a barrister? I've heard of some exam u hav to do to become a barrister, what is it?

    thanks for everyone's reply, it's been very helpful.
    firstly, if you get good grades (i.e. AAA/AAB) you have a chance of getting into the best unis. Also ABB will certainly get you into many respected unis. Becoming a barrister is totally different to becoming a solicitor.

    To become a barrister:

    1. Apply to Inns of Court (final yr uni) i.e. Lincoln's Inn, Inner Temple, Middle Temple, Gray's Inn.
    2. Apply to Chambers for pupillage.
    3. Do BVC (Bar Vocational Course) at a law school e.g. BPP
    4. Do 1yr pupillage.
    5. Hopefully get called to become a tenant
    6. Start your long barrister career

    To become a solicitor:

    1. Apply for vacation schemes at firms.
    2. Do vacation schemes at firms.
    3. Apply for training contracts.
    4. Do LPC at a law school.
    5. Start 2yr training contract
    6. After training contract become a qualified solicitor/lawyer

    Both are extremely competetive but if you have the right attitude (determination) you will go far!
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by dude_)
    I am quite interested in law and would like to see what it really is like? Can someone who is studying law tell me what it is like? I'd also want to know how to become a barrister or solicitor after getin a law degree
    There are some decent books in amazon that you could check out
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    does anyone know if derby uni is good for doing law?
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by boxer)
    does anyone know if derby uni is good for doing law?
    Derby is probably one of the worst in the country. If not the worst.
 
 
 
Turn on thread page Beta
TSR Support Team

We have a brilliant team of more than 60 Support Team members looking after discussions on The Student Room, helping to make it a fun, safe and useful place to hang out.

Updated: June 25, 2004
Poll
Do you like carrot cake?

The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

Write a reply...
Reply
Hide
Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.