building a gaming pc Watch

1tartanarmy
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Looking to build my own gaming PC for the first time ever. I have very little experience and have always been a console player. I was going to buy a pre-built one from ibuypower and got to the end and realised it was only a US and canada thing. So went to a UK site and noticed how much I was getting ripped off compared to the US Based ones.

Therefore decided to buy my own. I have a budget of £800 and will use it for gaming mainly. Looking for a decent build. Currently watching youtube videos about building my own PC to educate myself.

I was thinking an i7 cpu, with a nvidia geeforce gtx 970. I have learnt that these two components are probably the most important? Also was wanting built in wifi connectivity and the ability to read micro memory cards etc you can find in smart phones.

getting quite confused with all the different stuff I need in a build. Can someone help me with a starting point for a build based on this information?
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username1551801
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£800 and gaming?
You don't want an i7 then, not worth it.
Anything else, just ask.
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Aladino
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optical drive and sd card reader?
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It's****ingWOODY
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Good post above. Building it is a piece of pee, it's all slot this here, slot that there, connect everything to the power supply etc. Install windows and all your games and programs on the SSD as this will allow the best performance, then use the HDD to store everything else (pics, music, files and the like). Make sure you install all the latest drivers, particularly graphics drivers, to aid performance. Might want a high speed DVD drive as well.
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Plagioclase
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(Original post by WoodyMKC)
Good post above. Building it is a piece of pee, it's all slot this here, slot that there, connect everything to the power supply etc. Install windows and all your games and programs on the SSD as this will allow the best performance, then use the HDD to store everything else (pics, music, files and the like). Make sure you install all the latest drivers, particularly graphics drivers, to aid performance. Might want a high speed DVD drive as well.
Building it is easy, the problems start when you switch the computer on and it doesn't work. There's little that a few google searches and forum posts won't solve but it's not quite as easy as just slotting bits together.

(Original post by Aladino)
optical drive and sd card reader?
Who uses optical drives these days? Unless you've got a physical DVD or CD collection (which is pretty unusual these days) then there really aren't many situations where you'd need one.
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Camoxide
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Might be worth waiting for a bit.

Intel is meant to be releasing its next generation CPUs in August- September.
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Aladino
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(Original post by Plagioclase)
Building it is easy, the problems start when you switch the computer on and it doesn't work. There's little that a few google searches and forum posts won't solve but it's not quite as easy as just slotting bits together.



Who uses optical drives these days? Unless you've got a physical DVD or CD collection (which is pretty unusual these days) then there really aren't many situations where you'd need one.
used it to install windows
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Plagioclase
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(Original post by Aladino)
used it to install windows
You can do that via USB. It's not really worth buying an internal DVD drive just for the one case, if you really want to get a DVD drive then you might as well get an external one.
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username1551801
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Sorry, forgot about the optical drive and card reader.

I like internal optical drives, the transfer speed is far quicker on SATA than the USB.
If you have room, might as well get one for £10 - £15.

(Original post by Camoxide)
Might be worth waiting for a bit.

Intel is meant to be releasing its next generation CPUs in August- September.
Not the best idea to wait for next generation hardware. There will always be new hardware, so it's pointless to wait unless you're within a month.
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username1494226
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You can get some pretty bang for the buck hardware for £800. Here is a build I would recommend

HIS AMD Radeon R9 380- £170
Intel Core i5 4690K- £185
8GB Corsair Vengeance RAM 2400MHz- £50
650W Evga SuperNova G2- £75
Asus Z97K- £90
1TB HDD Western Digital Blue- £47
Cooler Master Hyper 212 Heatsink- £25
Fractal Design R4-£80
Windows 8.1-£70-£80

My logic for this build. The case I chose is a ATX form factor case so it will be fairly small(its a mid tower) and compact and thus quite easy to move around your home. In terms of the processor, I am suggesting a i5 4690K and a standard Z97 board because I'm assuming you may want to overclock down the line. GPU wise I was going to say the GTX 970 but the R9 380 at that price is ballin and its a nice entry level into PC gaming at 1080P. I would have put an SSD in there but you can add a cheap 256GB SSD for under £100 later down the line. This build I have outlined costs under £800
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Camoxide
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(Original post by Jared44)
Sorry, forgot about the optical drive and card reader.

I like internal optical drives, the transfer speed is far quicker on SATA than the USB.
If you have room, might as well get one for £10 - £15.



Not the best idea to wait for next generation hardware. There will always be new hardware, so it's pointless to wait unless you're within a month.
August is in a month...

The current CPUs are 2 years old now.
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mine turtle
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(Original post by Plagioclase)
Building it is easy, the problems start when you switch the computer on and it doesn't work. There's little that a few google searches and forum posts won't solve but it's not quite as easy as just slotting bits together.



Who uses optical drives these days? Unless you've got a physical DVD or CD collection (which is pretty unusual these days) then there really aren't many situations where you'd need one.
Me. All the time. My graduation DVD is physical media, my windows install is on a disc. I emulate PS1 games, and some of those are the original physical copies on disc, and I emulate PS2 games (some from the original disc as well). 90% of my movies are on DVD or Blu Ray and need an optical drive to watch. There's two optical drives in my PC, both Blu Ray. One is bound epsxe and the other PCSX2. So, the drives get quite a bit of use, not as much as they would have back in the day, but quite a lot still

EDIT: I forgot, GTA V and The Witcher 3: Wild hunt are on disc
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Camoxide
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Optical drives are so cheap you might as well have one for the rare occasion you may want to use it.
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