Turn on thread page Beta
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Alexander)
    I'm reading Strange Meeting at the moment too -- in answer to your question, I don't remember/haven't reached that point, but possibly because they remind him of the smell of gas?
    its at the beginning of the book when hes in the hospital and can smell roses in the room... it repeats this thing of his hate of its smell throughout the book but doesn't seem to elaborate! my thinking was that as he's so accustomed to the vile smell of a trench this is the norm for him... the smell of roses is such a contrast to this that he ses it as bad... maybe?! :confused:
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    for me this exam in on the 15th june (tues) not the 22nd. i have keats and othello on the 22nd.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by sneezyme)
    for me this exam in on the 15th june (tues) not the 22nd. i have keats and othello on the 22nd.

    yeh they are correct dates as i have um!
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by sneezyme)
    for me this exam in on the 15th june (tues) not the 22nd. i have keats and othello on the 22nd.
    ditto...omg im soo worried about keats!!
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    heres some 'All Quiet on the Western Front' quotes:

    1. “We were all at once terribly alone; and alone we must see it through.”Paul expresses how his generation feels cut off from the older generation. Ch.1, p. 12. (All references are to the edition translated by A. W. Wheen and published by Little, Brown & Company, 1929.)

    2. “The ‘Iron Youth.’”Kantorek’s expression for the young soldiers. Ch. 2, p. 18.

    3. “To no man does the earth mean so much as to the soldier. When he presses himself down upon her long and powerfully, when he buries his face and his limbs deep in her from the fear of death by shell-fire, then she is his only friend, his brother, his mother; he stifles his terror and his cries in her silence and security; she shelters him and gives him a new lease of ten seconds of life, receives him again and often for ever.”
    Paul’s thoughts. Ch. 4, p. 54.

    4. “It’s unendurable. It is the moaning of the world, it is the martyred creation, wild with anguish, filled with terror, and groaning.” Paul’s comments about the sounds made by the wounded horses. Ch. 4, p. 62.

    5. “We have lost all feeling for one another. We can hardly control ourselves when our hunted glance lights on the form of some other man. We are insensible, dead men, who through some trick, some dreadful magic, are still able to run and to kill.”Paul’s thoughts as his men counter-attack during a long battle. Ch. 6, p. 115.

    6. “A terrible feeling of foreignness suddenly rises up in me. I cannot find my way back, I am shut out though I entreat earnestly and put forth all my strength.” Paul, on leave, sits in his own room, but cannot relate to all the things of his past. Ch. 7, p. 176.

    7. “A word of command has made these silent figures our enemies; a word of command might transform them into our friends.”
    Paul’s reflections about the Russian prisoners. Ch. 8, p. 195.

    8. “Forgive me, comrade; how could you be my enemy? If we threw away these rifles and this uniform you could be my brother just like Kat and Albert.”Paul speaks to the French soldier he has just killed in the shell-hole. Ch. 9, p. 226.

    9. “A hospital alone shows what war is.” Paul’s observation after seeing the terrible wounds the men in the hospital suffer from, which is still only one of hundreds of thousands of hospitals that care for the victims of the war. Ch. 10, p. 266.

    10. “All quiet on the Western Front.” The army report on the day in October, 1918, when Paul was killed. Ch. 12, p. 291.
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by kokopops1)
    ditto...omg im soo worried about keats!!
    me too what if stupid questions come up like a few years ago when they said that Keats' poems are childish and too give examples..
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by sneezyme)
    me too what if stupid questions come up like a few years ago when they said that Keats' poems are childish and too give examples..
    omg...i'd die...hopefully im counting on something on the contexts
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    okay u guys, need a huge favour, run out of time and havent had time to read the whole of Birdsong. But ive been told i have to read the section based around the tunnels? I was wondering if one of u could tell me where this section begins in the novel, thank u. xxxx
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Kim-blay)
    okay u guys, need a huge favour, run out of time and havent had time to read the whole of Birdsong. But ive been told i have to read the section based around the tunnels? I was wondering if one of u could tell me where this section begins in the novel, thank u. xxxx
    The biggest chunk is in part 2 - france 1916 this is definitely the most important section of the book!
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    it starts on page 121 and its quite important, if you read it, you'll be able to use it to make references to wider reading for lots of questions.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    ok Regeneration quotes here:

    "lying in a shell hole with your legs shot off" (reality of war)

    "Armagedon,Gologtha, there were no words to desribe a place of desolation" ( sassoon describing the front-line)

    "Pure joy to go to bed in white sheets and know he would wake" ( sassoon on life in craiglockharts)

    "three months" average life expectancy at front

    "needed her ignorance to hide in" ( prior on his girlfriend sarah lumb)


    "mobilized into holes so constricted they could hardly move." (passivity of trench life)

    the war " delivered 'feminine passivity'"

    "it pumped out of him" ( describes anderson the surgeon, horror of war)
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    Thank you sneezyme and wibble, much appreciated.
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    s'ok
    hey this is really great cos' i've now got sooo many quotes and it's helped a lot so well done guys

    whos doing keats and othello? how are you revising for these? for keas i'm doing themes and stuff and for othello i just keep reading critical essays. o and quotes oh course!
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    I'm doing othello and am mainly just memorising quotes and reading through past essays iv done! what do you mean by critical essays?
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    hey
    i mean essays wriiten by famous critics to put across a certain point of view, backed up by lots of evidence. as i'm on AQA spec A for my othello question i will have two statements by critics, which i have to discuss in my essay. so reading essays from critics is a good idea as it helps you to see the way they express their points of view, and how they use evidence.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by sneezyme)
    hey
    i mean essays wriiten by famous critics to put across a certain point of view, backed up by lots of evidence. as i'm on AQA spec A for my othello question i will have two statements by critics, which i have to discuss in my essay. so reading essays from critics is a good idea as it helps you to see the way they express their points of view, and how they use evidence.

    can you view these essays online???
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    erm... i don't know i'm sure u can, i'll get back to you on that one. you can get a book full of these in the 'casebook series' just ask your library for the 'othello' book in the 'casebook series' and i'm sure they'll have it, esp. in a school library. some of the essays in here are degree level, but it will help you no doubt!
    also read e-magazine, there's an article in that by bonnie greer on 'othello'
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by sneezyme)
    erm... i don't know i'm sure u can, i'll get back to you on that one. you can get a book full of these in the 'casebook series' just ask your library for the 'othello' book in the 'casebook series' and i'm sure they'll have it, esp. in a school library. some of the essays in here are degree level, but it will help you no doubt!
    also read e-magazine, there's an article in that by bonnie greer on 'othello'
    thanks il have to do that! iv been leaving othello out a bit in my revision... just concentrating on the war exam! tuesday's so close
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    hi could someone please outline what are the main points when referring to the relevance of the author's gender. And how exactly does one go about writing about typicality when the war literature is so varied. I find it hard to place pieces in similar groups.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    ok gender, with poetry anyway male poets had first hand experience of trench life giving a more realisitc view of war. in contrast women like jessie pope saw war as merely a game! but then you will get the women poets who were VADS like vera Britain and others who got to see the true horrors of war. often womens poetry will deal and portray their husbands/lovers as hero's and are therefore hero worshippers!

    the change in poetry in particular , well i spilt it into pre somme and post somme. (1916 july)

    pre somme stuff like brooke tends to be more positive and pastoral imagery, it was used for propaganda! Whereas a lot of owen's poetry is post somme and is very negative and descriptive. eg Dulce et dercorum est, disabled

    any material written after the war finished is a lot more critical as it has had time to reflect and evalaute the conduct of the war. e.g birdsong, regneration.

    satire is more more common is plays and stuff after the war, as it can be mockin towards the conduct and get away with it hope that helps!

    look for themes that can connect the extracts in the exam:
    horrors of war ( mental affects)
    Death/injury
    inept command/ poor conduct of the war
    optimism/pratrioism ( or lack of it!!)
    hummour
    hero's/cowards
 
 
 

University open days

  1. Loughborough University
    General Open Day Undergraduate
    Fri, 21 Sep '18
  2. University of Cambridge
    Churchill College Undergraduate
    Fri, 21 Sep '18
  3. Richmond, The American International University in London
    Undergraduate Open Day Undergraduate
    Fri, 21 Sep '18
Poll
Which accompaniment is best?

The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

Write a reply...
Reply
Hide
Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.