Aimi98
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I'm interested in studying law, specifically law with American legal studies. I'm not too confident in speaking publicly and not particularly keen on composing emails and letters. Will this effect my study? Are they both important factors to studying law?

Could really do with some advice as I'm in a dilemma. I don't have a large amount of confidence, but i do not want it to affect my career.
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hermaphroditecat
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I was just like you, I was apprehensive on whether to do law as I was so fearful of social situations. However, I told myself I need to be more confident so I threw myself into work experience at a law firm and now I'm fine. Keep in mind I used to be scared to answer a phone or even answer the door but now I'm fine. Don't let social anxiety stop you, conquer it by getting out of your comfort zone.


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LukeyJB
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Confidence comes over time. When I left school and started my A-levels, I had very little. Even after finishing my A-levels, I still dreaded any sort of public speaking or giving presentations. Now, two years later, I am about to start the final year of my law degree and in that time I have gone from somebody who would shy away from a group presentation to somebody who has stood up in front of full lecture halls and spoken without any problems whatsoever.
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Crazy Jamie
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(Original post by Aimi98)
I'm interested in studying law, specifically law with American legal studies. I'm not too confident in speaking publicly and not particularly keen on composing emails and letters. Will this effect my study? Are they both important factors to studying law?

Could really do with some advice as I'm in a dilemma. I don't have a large amount of confidence, but i do not want it to affect my career.
Neither of them play any part in studying law, so they certainly wouldn't affect you when doing your law degree. However, if you were to become a solicitor writing letters and e-mails would be a notable part of your job, whilst obviously public speaking is an integral part of being a barrister, so they would be an issue if you intend to practise in the law. What is it that you actually want to do as a job?

Irrespective, I am assuming that you are a teenager given that you haven't chosen your degree subject yet, and in which case you have plenty of time to build your confidence. University is a completely different world to school, and you'll have lots of opportunities to do a wide range of activities and pursue plenty of interests away from studying. Whilst there can obviously be no guarantees, it's the perfect environment to build your confidence, and even if it wasn't, confidence is often something that develops with time and experience anyway.
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happyinthehaze
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Won't effect your study and in all liklihood you would become better and more used to public speaking/writing letters and emailing.

If you do study law, join the mooting or debating society and this will help you - no-one really likes speaking in public it's just something you get more experienced at - letters and emails; you are just not used to writing them! Again, you will get used to it and get better at it!
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LukeyJB
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(Original post by Crazy Jamie)
Neither of them play any part in studying law, so they certainly wouldn't affect you when doing your law degree. However, if you were to become a solicitor writing letters and e-mails would be a notable part of your job, whilst obviously public speaking is an integral part of being a barrister, so they would be an issue if you intend to practise in the law. What is it that you actually want to do as a job?

Irrespective, I am assuming that you are a teenager given that you haven't chosen your degree subject yet, and in which case you have plenty of time to build your confidence. University is a completely different world to school, and you'll have lots of opportunities to do a wide range of activities and pursue plenty of interests away from studying. Whilst there can obviously be no guarantees, it's the perfect environment to build your confidence, and even if it wasn't, confidence is often something that develops with time and experience anyway.
Confidence does play a part in studying law, you're regularly expected to give presentations and speak in seminars.
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AsandaLFC
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(Original post by hermaphroditecat)
I was just like you, I was apprehensive on whether to do law as I was so fearful of social situations. However, I told myself I need to be more confident so I threw myself into work experience at a law firm and now I'm fine. Keep in mind I used to be scared to answer a phone or even answer the door but now I'm fine. Don't let social anxiety stop you, conquer it by getting out of your comfort zone.


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Why were u scared of answering the phone ?

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hermaphroditecat
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I honestly don't know, I think it was the concept that I anticipated I would be so awkward on the phone that I feared answering it.
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hermaphroditecat
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(Original post by J-SP)
You'd be surprised how many people also find it an issue. It comes from a society now where many people avoid calls from anyone they don't know, and even with those they do know they rely on IM/texts instead.


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Exactly!
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Crazy Jamie
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(Original post by LukeyJB)
Confidence does play a part in studying law, you're regularly expected to give presentations and speak in seminars.
Whilst I don't want to get bogged down in semantics, for me "public speaking" is a different proposition to speaking with a classroom environment. To that extent studying law really isn't substantively different to many other degree subjects that would require participation in that sort of environment. If the OP's issues with public speaking extended to insurmountable issues with speaking within a classroom situation I suspect they would have mentioned it. But in any event, speaking in that sort of environment is exactly the sort of thing that will help develop confidence, and shouldn't in my view be a reason not to study law at all.
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SLS55
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(Original post by AsandaLFC)
Why were u scared of answering the phone ?

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Because, you never know who was phone.
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pp93
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(Original post by Aimi98)
I'm interested in studying law, specifically law with American legal studies. I'm not too confident in speaking publicly and not particularly keen on composing emails and letters. Will this effect my study? Are they both important factors to studying law?

Could really do with some advice as I'm in a dilemma. I don't have a large amount of confidence, but i do not want it to affect my career.
Public speaking and writing emails don't really play much of a part in academic law. You can do things like mooting at uni which will require you to speak in front of an audience, but that's extra curricular and optional.

However, something like drafting an email is common in any job and indeed in ordinary life. Confidence can be built over time and certainly a lot of people really do come into their own whilst at university. Study a subject you're genuinely interested in and confidence will flow naturally.


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MoHoosen9167
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I've applied to do a Law degree - hopefully I'll get my grades and start the Uni of Leeds in September! I would definitely advise you to try and put yourself out there a bit more; even though my sixth form and secondary school were the same building, so it wasn't really a change, I definitely felt more empowered in sixth form. Part of it was knowing I chose subjects that I was good as, as well as subjects that everyone in the class wanted to do well in. If you're in Year 12, you'll definitely know what I'm talking about. So, as far as the confidence aspect of a Law degree goes, don't stress too much about that. There are plenty of opportunities to increase your self confidence, as well as overall confidence; little victories like working hard and doing well in a test can do *wonders* for you. If you want any advice in terms of like English skills, I can help you! Good luck!
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MediterraneanX
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(Original post by LukeyJB)
Confidence does play a part in studying law, you're regularly expected to give presentations and speak in seminars.
That depends on your university - I never had to give presentations at mine, and I can count on multiple hands how many people went through three years of seminars without ever opening their mouths.
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emmings
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(Original post by J-SP)
You'd be surprised how many people also find it an issue. It comes from a society now where many people avoid calls from anyone they don't know, and even with those they do know they rely on IM/texts instead.


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As a 4PQE solicitor, I am amazed at the number of trainees and NQs who are scared to make phone calls. And yet while sending an email is easy, picking up the phone is often so much easier when you need to find out something quickly or need to explain a complicated point to a client or need to chase the other side (emails can and will be ignored). I find I have to specifically instruct trainees to pick up the phone or they won't do it. It's infuriating.
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slade p
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Solicitors don't have to speak in courts but making emails and letters are basic stuff.
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TheCynicalOne
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For any lawyer, both public speaking and written skills are absolute key, so if you are not keen on either, then maybe a career in law is not for you.
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Crazy Jamie
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(Original post by TheCynicalOne)
For any lawyer, both public speaking and written skills are absolute key, so if you are not keen on either, then maybe a career in law is not for you.
Public speaking is not key, nor indeed even particularly important, for the majority of solicitors.
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TheCynicalOne
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(Original post by Crazy Jamie)
Public speaking is not key, nor indeed even particularly important, for the majority of solicitors.
Let me guess - because they sit in an office all day, doing paperwork?
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Crazy Jamie
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(Original post by TheCynicalOne)
Let me guess - because they sit in an office all day, doing paperwork?
No, because for the majority of solicitors public speaking is not one of the many things that they may be required to do on a daily or consistent basis, if indeed they are required to do so at all. Though by all means, given that you claim to be a solicitor, feel free to explain on what basis you assert that public speaking is key for 'any lawyer'.
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