jrichmond4
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I've recently got into Durham for MChem and they told us it's not too soon to start thinking about what we want to do after university so I was wondering what steps would be needed to go from a masters in Chemistry to (chartered) chemical engineer status; is it possible to jump into a PhD in Chemical Engineering? Manchester are advertising a PhD in Chemical Engineering that requires a good 2:1/first in your masters from a variety of subjects, including chemistry.

[(Didn't do chemical engineering due to doing Further Maths, Maths, Biology and Chemistry A levels and my college didn't allow me to do a fifth (physics), thought I'd do medicine and love maths so it seemed appropriate).]
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Abigail.alex
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(Original post by jrichmond4)
I've recently got into Durham for MChem and they told us it's not too soon to start thinking about what we want to do after university so I was wondering what steps would be needed to go from a masters in Chemistry to (chartered) chemical engineer status; is it possible to jump into a PhD in Chemical Engineering? Manchester are advertising a PhD in Chemical Engineering that requires a good 2:1/first in your masters from a variety of subjects, including chemistry.

[(Didn't do chemical engineering due to doing Further Maths, Maths, Biology and Chemistry A levels and my college didn't allow me to do a fifth (physics), thought I'd do medicine and love maths so it seemed appropriate).]I
Hey, wondering whether anyone knows the answer to this i have the same problem
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Compost
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(Original post by Abigail.alex)
Hey, wondering whether anyone knows the answer to this i have the same problem
People do move on to chem eng MSCs or PhDs having studied other related subjects first - you'd need to talk to the programme provider to see if you'd be suitable. If you do this then it's possible to get chartered but you would have to go through an extra process to prove you have the academic background required.

Broadly speaking, there are 3 ways you can satisfy the academic requirement for chem eng:

  1. An accredited M-standard chem eng degree (in the UK that's an MEng that has been accredited by IChemE)
  2. An accredited B-standard chem eng degree (that's a BEng) plus an accredited F-standard degree (that's an MSc)
  3. degree(s) plus you have to go though the individual case procedure where they look at your academic quals (could any/more than one of unaccredited chem eng degree(s), degrees in other engineering disciplines or chemistry or others, with or without related EngD or PhD in chem eng) plus the learning you have gained through working and decide if it's equivalent to the standard routes 1 or 2. Chemistry then an MSc or PhD in chem eng is not an unusual set of options for this. https://www.icheme.org/membership/me...ember-stage-1/
Last edited by Compost; 1 month ago
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