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    Still more famous people than we have. How cool would it be to have the Darkness turn up in your music class to chat to their old teachers .

    And we always have a ceilidh as our Christmas Social (ball type thing). It's quite good, although after half an hour the sides of the hall were littered with discarded heels(including my own. I'm a trainers person )
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    (Original post by Faboba)
    While it's true in a sense that Caleighs/( alright Acaila Ceilidhs ) are part of the whole faux-Scottish thing, they're nothing if not a pleasant part of it. The beauty of Scottish dancing is that even if you don't know the exact moves most follow a close enough pattern that you can either imitate your nieghbour or if hopelessly inebriated can flail about wildly without looking too far out of step.

    Always wanted to try my hand at ballroom dancing. The opportunity has never really arisen yet, strangely. Dancing is quite possibly my only talent.
    Dancing, along with football and being popular, is one of the many things that definately don't come into my talent list (which is very short outside of academic stuff!) but seeing Strictly Come Dancing has really changed my idea of what ballroom dancing is about. I might possibly have a go, but it'd have to be with a girl I knew and was comfortable with, otherwise I'd just be so embarrased.
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    One thing about learning the kinda dancing you need for ceilidhs: It's hell. Up until last summer I hated doing that dancing because it inevitably meant the whole boys on one side of the hall, girls on the other thing. Once you get going to some proper ceilidhs - that's where the fun starts, and nobody cares who you're dancing with.
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    I think I've done a ceilidh dancing thing before.. It's pronounced "Keyley", right? I went on this holiday type thing with my volunteer group- it was like a volunteer conference, only extremely laid back. One of the things that we had to do was do a dance native to our country, and one girl in our group learned how to do it at a folk festival. I suppose that was stealing but the English don't have a dance, do they? Apparently the routine to "Tragedy" by Steps or "Saturday Night" by Whigfield don't count...

    But oh, I love to dance. I don't get to dance enough though, as I don't really go out to bars in town (precisely because there are no bars with dancefloors apart from the Litten Tree in town, as far as I know. The Firkin did but now they've renovated it and I haven't had a chance to see if it's still there) and I haven't the time to go to lessons.. Maybe over the summer!
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    What about Morris dancing?
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    (Original post by Acaila)
    What about Morris dancing?
    That's not a national dance! It's a dance native to those who are fools.
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    (Original post by F. Poste)
    I think I've done a ceilidh dancing thing before.. It's pronounced "Keyley", right? I went on this holiday type thing with my volunteer group- it was like a volunteer conference, only extremely laid back. One of the things that we had to do was do a dance native to our country, and one girl in our group learned how to do it at a folk festival. I suppose that was stealing but the English don't have a dance, do they? Apparently the routine to "Tragedy" by Steps or "Saturday Night" by Whigfield don't count...

    But oh, I love to dance. I don't get to dance enough though, as I don't really go out to bars in town (precisely because there are no bars with dancefloors apart from the Litten Tree in town, as far as I know. The Firkin did but now they've renovated it and I haven't had a chance to see if it's still there) and I haven't the time to go to lessons.. Maybe over the summer!
    The advantage that people at a Caleigh/Ceilidh ( too many goddam 'i's in Gaelic spelling ) have is that shared by all formal dancing practices - there are set rules and set steps and while the dances are enjoyable and deviation is encouraged everyone has a good notion of how to proceed thanks to the structure. Even break-dancing gives a certain freedom of dance through convention. When simply given music and told 'dance' the only way I've found to enjoy it is not not take it seriously and try to make it as clear as humanly possible that you aren't taking it seriously; if you fail to follow this simple rule outside formalised dancing you look like a ****.

    All dancing is basicly stupid; when viewed completely objectively while the moves may be in keeping to the rhythm and structure of the music they make little sense and the performer looks a fool. What structure ( even morris dancing structure ) gives is a base line which you can use to defend yourself with, saying; "No, no, no. I'm not being a fool. I'm doing X, Y, Z dancing." It is easy to say what makes a bad dancer - someone who looks half-assed and whose actions bear no relation to the music but I put it to you that to describe a good dancer outside of referrence to some kind of formalised structure is near impossible.
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    (Original post by F. Poste)
    That's not a national dance! It's a dance native to those who are fools.
    Get Faboba to show you a strip the willow That's a dance native to those who are fools
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    (Original post by Acaila)
    Get Faboba to show you a strip the willow That's a dance native to those who are fools
    Aha! Foolish and drunk should be the ideal for the dance methinks.
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    Very well, drunk and foolish it shall be. Certainly sums up my square tango attempts.
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    (Original post by Acaila)
    Very well, drunk and foolish it shall be. Certainly sums up my square tango attempts.
    A tango is something you see being peformed and think to yourself "wow I wish I could do that" and then instantly forget the notion after considering how long it would take to be even half decent. Rather like speaking Russian.

    Ever seen True Lies?
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    With the Governator and.....Jamie Lee Curtis was it?
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    (Original post by Faboba)
    The advantage that people at a Caleigh/Ceilidh ( too many goddam 'i's in Gaelic spelling ) have is that shared by all formal dancing practices - there are set rules and set steps and while the dances are enjoyable and deviation is encouraged everyone has a good notion of how to proceed thanks to the structure. Even break-dancing gives a certain freedom of dance through convention. When simply given music and told 'dance' the only way I've found to enjoy it is not not take it seriously and try to make it as clear as humanly possible that you aren't taking it seriously; if you fail to follow this simple rule outside formalised dancing you look like a ****.

    All dancing is basicly stupid; when viewed completely objectively while the moves may be in keeping to the rhythm and structure of the music they make little sense and the performer looks a fool. What structure ( even morris dancing structure ) gives is a base line which you can use to defend yourself with, saying; "No, no, no. I'm not being a fool. I'm doing X, Y, Z dancing." It is easy to say what makes a bad dancer - someone who looks half-assed and whose actions bear no relation to the music but I put it to you that to describe a good dancer outside of referrence to some kind of formalised structure is near impossible.
    You forget though- just dancing (with no formal dance structure), if you enjoy it, isn't about the way you look at all. When you're not in front of mirrored walls in a dance studio, you can't see the way you look so it's all about the way you feel. I remember when I was in year four or five, Dirty Dancing was on TV and practically all the girls in my class had stayed up to watch it. I still love that film, despite the fact that it's much-mocked as a chick flick. And while the dancing is good, the reason that so many people love that film is because it's about being young, free and in love in the summer. The reason that, at eight or nine, I tried to do the "lift" on a chair, was nothing to do with the fact that it looked impressive but all about the fact that I wanted to be the girl in the film- to be young and in love in summer.

    *passes out sick bags in case the girlieness of this post makes anyone queasy*
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    (Original post by F. Poste)
    You forget though- just dancing (with no formal dance structure), if you enjoy it, isn't about the way you look at all. When you're not in front of mirrored walls in a dance studio, you can't see the way you look so it's all about the way you feel. I remember when I was in year four or five, Dirty Dancing was on TV and practically all the girls in my class had stayed up to watch it. I still love that film, despite the fact that it's much-mocked as a chick flick. And while the dancing is good, the reason that so many people love that film is because it's about being young, free and in love in the summer. The reason that, at eight or nine, I tried to do the "lift" on a chair, was nothing to do with the fact that it looked impressive but all about the fact that I wanted to be the girl in the film- to be young and in love in summer.

    *passes out sick bags in case the girlieness of this post makes anyone queasy*

    Normally, I would've already heaved twice but this time I'll let it pass cos I agree with the comments - you dance not especially to look good, but to feel good/enjoy urself. Of course, it helps when you've a "wee tipple" and so imagine yourself to be looking/dancing much better than you would to the average sober person.
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    (Original post by F. Poste)
    You forget though- just dancing (with no formal dance structure), if you enjoy it, isn't about the way you look at all. When you're not in front of mirrored walls in a dance studio, you can't see the way you look so it's all about the way you feel. I remember when I was in year four or five, Dirty Dancing was on TV and practically all the girls in my class had stayed up to watch it. I still love that film, despite the fact that it's much-mocked as a chick flick. And while the dancing is good, the reason that so many people love that film is because it's about being young, free and in love in the summer. The reason that, at eight or nine, I tried to do the "lift" on a chair, was nothing to do with the fact that it looked impressive but all about the fact that I wanted to be the girl in the film- to be young and in love in summer.

    *passes out sick bags in case the girlieness of this post makes anyone queasy*
    A fair point, but in answer I can only say that we know how we look by how we feel we look. Check out proprioception. At the end of the day if you feel you look stupid, that's what counts.

    ( And you can save the sick bags - it was a good film. Don't be too worried by what is or isn't 'girly'. That's for people who lack confidence in who they are ).

    (Original post by Acaila)
    With the Governator and.....Jamie Lee Curtis was it?
    Yeah. All in all a rather dire film but like many Arnie flicks watchable in the midst of it's awfulness ( see; Total Recall ). The tango scene was great though. Anyone know what the piece of music playing in it was? I've heard it before many times but the first that comes to mind is the opening of Schindler's List ( Steven Spielberg, I love you ).
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    F. Poste - unless you're thinking of a totally different one, how on earth do you do that lift with a chair? I agree about wanting to be in that film though, but it was more of a year 11 thing for us
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    (Original post by Faboba)
    Yeah. All in all a rather dire film but like many Arnie flicks watchable in the midst of it's awfulness ( see; Total Recall ). The tango scene was great though. Anyone know what the piece of music playing in it was? I've heard it before many times but the first that comes to mind is the opening of Schindler's List ( Steven Spielberg, I love you ).
    Being suddenley reminded of the tune motivated me to go and find it! :rolleyes: Its "Por Una Cabeza", a tango piece by Carlos Gardel i believe.
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    (Original post by Faboba)
    A fair point, but in answer I can only say that we know how we look by how we feel we look. Check out proprioception. At the end of the day if you feel you look stupid, that's what counts.

    ( And you can save the sick bags - it was a good film. Don't be too worried by what is or isn't 'girly'. That's for people who lack confidence in who they are ).
    Don't worry, the sick bags were in case anyone else had a problem

    I'm going to play devil's advocate (for want of a better phrase) and say that people who are confident in who they are will be the ones who don't care how the hell they look when they're dancing, because how you think you're looking is surely only a mental reflection of what you think other people can see? I'm not really arguing, but I think if you think you look stupid it's because people have low confidence in that area. Me, I don't care- I'd never dance in a way I thought looked stupid but the last time I was out I was twirling along to Hey Ya while eating a packet of crisps. My friends were like "look at her, what a kook" "hahah only Kate would mesh eating and dancing" etc etc, but I felt free and wonderful and slightly pissed and didn't really care at all. I was hungry, and no-one was going to deny me of my crisps!

    *stops before she goes into a really big tangent*


    (Original post by Helenia)
    F. Poste - unless you're thinking of a totally different one, how on earth do you do that lift with a chair? I agree about wanting to be in that film though, but it was more of a year 11 thing for us
    You kind of pull yourself up with your hands and try to balance the best you can while trying to lean horizontally! Of course it looks nothing like the real thing, that's why an active imagination was needed I've never found a man who can and will lift me
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    (Original post by F. Poste)
    Don't worry, the sick bags were in case anyone else had a problem

    I'm going to play devil's advocate (for want of a better phrase) and say that people who are confident in who they are will be the ones who don't care how the hell they look when they're dancing, because how you think you're looking is surely only a mental reflection of what you think other people can see? I'm not really arguing, but I think if you think you look stupid it's because people have low confidence in that area. Me, I don't care- I'd never dance in a way I thought looked stupid but the last time I was out I was twirling along to Hey Ya while eating a packet of crisps. My friends were like "look at her, what a kook" "hahah only Kate would mesh eating and dancing" etc etc, but I felt free and wonderful and slightly pissed and didn't really care at all. I was hungry, and no-one was going to deny me of my crisps!

    *stops before she goes into a really big tangent*
    I dunno. To my mind there's a difference between self-assuredness and sociopathy. It isn't good to be completely oblivious to the opinions of others; after all didn't momma say "stupid is as stupid does".

    But enough on this subject. Time for a radical injection of something completely different;

    http://www.ebaumsworld.com/presaddress2.shtml
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    (Original post by Elles)
    last term £55.26 this term £66.79..

    that's really good! i'm a bit worried though..dad told me not to get a student loan...he's getting a pay rise in the autumn and the bonus should just about cover all my living costs...but only probably if i live on baked beans all term.....
 
 
 
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