asaaal
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Hi everyone!

I thought id make a thread which we can all share any good ways to remember drug types/groups/names!

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thegodofgod
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(Original post by asaaal)
Hi everyone!

I thought id make a thread which we can all share any good ways to remember drug types/groups/names!

Usually I remember drug classes by the similarities between names of the drugs within that class, e.g.
ACE inhibitors: -pril (ramipril, lisinopril, perindopril, etc.);
Long-acting beta agonists: -terol (salmeterol, formoterol, etc.);
Dihydropyridine calcium-channel blockers: -dipine (amlodipine, nifedipine, felodipine, etc.);
Beta-blockers: -lol (propranolol, carvedilol, bisoprolol, sotalol, etc.);
Alpha-blockers: -osin (prazosin, doxazosin, tamsulosin, etc.).
Sulfonylureas: gli- (gliclazide, glimepiride, glipizide, glibenclamide, etc.)

Sometimes, though, certain drugs within the same class will have completely unrelated names, e.g.
Thiazide-like diuretics: chlorthalidone vs. indapamide;
Short-acting beta agonists: salbutamol vs. terbutaline;
SSRIs: citalopram vs. fluoxetine.

So I guess for these drugs you kind of just have to know them?

Hope this helps!
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Coriolantus
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We get them on little drug cards, so I recorded myself reading the cards out loud so I could listen back to them later which worked alright, although to this day I still get stuck on amiodarone, amlodipine and amiloride, because they're all cardiac drugs and they all start with the same letters, it confuses me.
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thegodofgod
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(Original post by Coriolantus)
We get them on little drug cards, so I recorded myself reading the cards out loud so I could listen back to them later which worked alright, although to this day I still get stuck on amiodarone, amlodipine and amiloride, because they're all cardiac drugs and they all start with the same letters, it confuses me.
Amiodarone and dronedarone - they both end in -darone, so they're anti-arrhythmics

Amlodipine and nifedipine - they both end in -dipine, so they're dihydropyridine (smooth muscle) calcium-channel blockers

Amiloride and triamterene - nothing in common name-wise, but they're both non-aldosterone antagonist (e.g. spironolactone and eplerenone) potassium-sparing diuretics
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A5ko
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Try to have a memorable story for each one you take...



Ah, I've misunderstood.
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Coriolantus
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(Original post by thegodofgod)
Amiodarone and dronedarone - they both end in -darone, so they're anti-arrhythmics

Amlodipine and nifedipine - they both end in -dipine, so they're dihydropyridine (smooth muscle) calcium-channel blockers

Amiloride and triamterene - nothing in common name-wise, but they're both non-aldosterone antagonist (e.g. spironolactone and eplerenone) potassium-sparing diuretics
Dronedarone sounds like a species of camel. Maybe that's just because it makes me think of dromedaries. We didn't have dronedarone on our cards though.

Diuretics are not my favourite drugs to remember, I have to admit.
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thegodofgod
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(Original post by Coriolantus)
Dronedarone sounds like a species of camel. Maybe that's just because it makes me think of dromedaries. We didn't have dronedarone on our cards though.

Diuretics are not my favourite drugs to remember, I have to admit.
Amiodarone is really the one you need to remember in terms of anti-arrhythmics, as it is one of the most effective ones. I only gave dronedarone as an example to show that that is one way to remember the anti-arrhythmics.

COLTT-K

Carbonic anhydrase inhibitors, e.g. acetazolamide, brinzolamide (most end in -zolamide)*
Osmotic diuretics, e.g. mannitol
Loop diuretics, e.g. furosemide and bumetanide (remember -mide and -nide)
Thiazide diuretics, e.g. hydrochlorothiazide and bendroflumethiazide (end in -thiazide)
Thiazide-like diuretics, e.g. chlorthalidone (recommended by NICE) and indapamide (just need to know those drugs, I'm afraid)
K+-sparing diuretics (Aldosterone antagonists, e.g. spironolactone and eplerenone, and non-aldosterone antagonists, e.g. amiloride and triamterene).

This is a good way to remember them, as it tells you where along the nephron each diuretic class works, as well as the order of each of the sections of the nephron:

C - proximal tubule
O - descending limb of loop of Henlé
L - thick ascending limb of loop of Henlé
TT - early distal tubule
K - late distal tubule and collecting ducts

* Systemic carbonic anhydrase inhibitors (acetazolamide tablets) are very rarely used as diuretics nowadays; topical formulations have been developed (brinzolamide eye drops, dorzolamide eye drops) for the treatment of ocular hypertension, which is a significant risk factor for developing glaucoma.

Hope this helps
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