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politics:electoral systems used in the UK?? watch

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    im unsure of what systems are used here and where they are used and what for. Can anyone help or know somewhere that i can find out?? im in desperate need as im revising for the exam on wednesday and have so much left to do and no time as i have english on monday!!!
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    (Original post by sparklyteacosie)
    im unsure of what systems are used here and where they are used and what for. Can anyone help or know somewhere that i can find out?? im in desperate need as im revising for the exam on wednesday!!
    Yep, I have English on Monday too and politics on wednesday

    the best website i found was:
    http://www.aceproject.org/main/english/es/

    as long as you know the PR system - advantages and disadvantges, including two other systems, you'll be ok for paper 1

    good luck with your exams

    cellardore
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    ooh that looks like a great site..

    my teacher for unit one was complete crap- he just gave us notes that he got from some schools website and then went through them- we literally spent months on democracy!!!!!

    good luck to you..xx
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    (Original post by sparklyteacosie)
    im unsure of what systems are used here and where they are used and what for. Can anyone help or know somewhere that i can find out?? im in desperate need as im revising for the exam on wednesday and have so much left to do and no time as i have english on monday!!!
    Hey, this is going to be detailed, just because I want to test myself!!

    General Elections - First Past the Post

    This system (also known as simple plurality) means that the winner is the person who gains the most votes, he does not require an overal majority of 50% - an MP could be elected in a constintueny on only 30% of the vote, if the other 70% was spread widely across other candidates. This system has been widely criticised as it disadvantages 3rd parties and those who do not have concentrated support and leads to the creation of minority governments (of the ~50% who voted in 2001 only ~42% supported Labour). This system has single member constituencies.

    Local Elections - First Past the Post

    European Elections - Party List

    This system has large multimember constituncies. You vote for a party not for a candidate. The percentage of the vote each party gains determines the number of candidates they get, in a vote with 50% Labour 50% conservative the seats would be split 2-2 in a 4 member constuiency. The candiate choice comes from the parties 'list' of candiates with the top candiate being selected first...then if they got a high enough percentage the next candidate etc.

    Scotland and Wales - Alternative Member System

    This system has often been described as a 'Hybrid System' of both FPTP and PR. Everybody has 2 votes, one for an MP for their constituency and 1 for a party, some MPs are elected via FPTP while there are 'top up' seats on the basis of the party vote in order to ensure proportionality. This leads to the problem of 2 tiers of MP, those directly elected by the people and those who are 'top-up' MPs just to make it proportional - the former has more legitmacy.

    Northern Ireland - Single Transferable Vote

    The electorate order there candidates in preference (1,2,3,4 etc.) and using the 'droop' forumla a quota of votes is decided in order to see who is elected. First prefences are counted and if someone had gained the quota then his surplus votes are then re-distrubuted (all his votes are, but at a fraction of the value to ensure fairness). If after the re-distrubution still no candidate has reached the quota, the lowest candidate is eliminated and his votes re-distributed - this is continuted until all the seats have been filled.
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    Corey, you are a political genius And very helpful as always!
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    Don't forget AV for the london mayor to ensure that the mayor voted in will have a majority, which is a novelty now a days
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    show off :rolleyes:
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    oooh great little definitions/summaries..much better than all the political jargon in my text books!!!!! thanks

    and just incase anyone else is getting stuck on electoral reform i found this great site electoral reform
 
 
 

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