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Lularose83
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Hi I haven't seen a thread for this so I thought I'd make one.
I'm applying for neuroscience as a medicine back up plan, but I'm most likely taking a gap year If I get 4 med rejections. Is anyone else thinking of applying, and if so, where are you applying?
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Lularose83
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Anyone?
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vildeung
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I'm applying for neuroscience at UCL and King's (might change that one though)! And biochemistry too, at Oxford, Imperial and York. What about you?
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Lularose83
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(Original post by vildeung)
I'm applying for neuroscience at UCL and King's (might change that one though)! And biochemistry too, at Oxford, Imperial and York. What about you?
Yay! Someone else who is applying I was thinking Nottingham or KIngs, are you a med applicant as well?
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vildeung
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No, not a med student! Just interested in the brain really..
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Ezme39
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Hey, I'm a med applicant looking at 2015 clearing if I miss my grades- so I'm hoping someone could answer a couple of my questions about neuroscience
1) how important is it to have a masters?
2) if you do a degree at a uni which doesn't offer a masters, can you transfer to a different uni for this?

thanks!
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Lularose83
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Bump ^
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vildeung
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(Original post by Ezme39)
Hey, I'm a med applicant looking at 2015 clearing if I miss my grades- so I'm hoping someone could answer a couple of my questions about neuroscience
1) how important is it to have a masters?
2) if you do a degree at a uni which doesn't offer a masters, can you transfer to a different uni for this?

thanks!
1) Depends on your career goals. To me it is necessary, because I wish to pursue a career in research (which requires a phD). Do you know what you want to do with your degree?

2) Masters is a two year degree at graduate level (Bachelor is undergrad). And yes, I believe you can get this degree at whatever university offers it.
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Ezme39
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(Original post by vildeung)
1) Depends on your career goals. To me it is necessary, because I wish to pursue a career in research (which requires a phD). Do you know what you want to do with your degree?

2) Masters is a two year degree at graduate level (Bachelor is undergrad). And yes, I believe you can get this degree at whatever university offers it.
Okay, that's very helpful! Thank you I'm not exactly sure at the moment, and research does appeal to me.
So, just to check that I understand- a masters degree can be 4 years, but a bachelor degree followed by a masters will probably be 5 years?
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vildeung
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(Original post by Ezme39)
Okay, that's very helpful! Thank you I'm not exactly sure at the moment, and research does appeal to me.
So, just to check that I understand- a masters degree can be 4 years, but a bachelor degree followed by a masters will probably be 5 years?
Yes that's how I think it works. But don't trust me entirely; you really should ask somebody who knows exactly what each degree entails. Perhaps your school counsellor can help you?
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Ezme39
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(Original post by vildeung)
Yes that's how I think it works. But don't trust me entirely; you really should ask somebody who knows exactly what each degree entails. Perhaps your school counsellor can help you?
I've emailed a couple of universities to double check, but in the meantime this has really reassured me thanks!
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Eloades11
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(Original post by vildeung)
2) Masters is a two year degree at graduate level (Bachelor is undergrad). And yes, I believe you can get this degree at whatever university offers it.
(Original post by Ezme39)
Okay, that's very helpful! Thank you I'm not exactly sure at the moment, and research does appeal to me.
So, just to check that I understand- a masters degree can be 4 years, but a bachelor degree followed by a masters will probably be 5 years?
Just to clear this up a little, a masters course is typically 1 year full-time, but there is the option to study part-time over the course of 2 years. There are 2 types of masters you can take, one is a taught masters (MSc) and the other is a master of research (MRes). The MSc will typically consist of a taught element followed by a research project, and most universities offer these. An MRes is not typically offered by a university but the option is there if you get in touch with a potential supervisor who is willing to accept you. I believe this is where you undertake 2 research projects with no taught element.

That was a bit about masters. Back to your question, a masters degree is definitely not 4 years unless it's integrated with a bachelors (MBio for example). You could be at university for 5 years if you took a sandwich year (placement year) in industry for work experience, in addition to a masters.

This doesn't apply for medicine, I don't know much about the medicine career path.
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vildeung
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(Original post by Eloades11)
Just to clear this up a little, a masters course is typically 1 year full-time, but there is the option to study part-time over the course of 2 years. There are 2 types of masters you can take, one is a taught masters (MSc) and the other is a master of research (MRes). The MSc will typically consist of a taught element followed by a research project, and most universities offer these. An MRes is not typically offered by a university but the option is there if you get in touch with a potential supervisor who is willing to accept you. I believe this is where you undertake 2 research projects with no taught element.

That was a bit about masters. Back to your question, a masters degree is definitely not 4 years unless it's integrated with a bachelors (MBio for example). You could be at university for 5 years if you took a sandwich year (placement year) in industry for work experience, in addition to a masters.

This doesn't apply for medicine, I don't know much about the medicine career path.
This is all true. I know King's offers integrated 4-year MSci with Neuroscience. Not sure about Nottingham though.
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mchanm
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Hey guys, do you know if it is better to have a medicine degree or a neuroscience degree to have a good career in neuroscience research ? Thank you )
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smozsolution
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Hey guys! Glad to see a thread for this.

I'm hoping to apply to Leeds, Manchester, Bristol, Edinburgh and Nottingham for Neuroscience.I've already started work on my personal statement and I've been doing additional reading around the subject.

Hope to see more of you on here soon
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vildeung
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(Original post by smozsolution)
Hey guys! Glad to see a thread for this.

I'm hoping to apply to Leeds, Manchester, Bristol, Edinburgh and Nottingham for Neuroscience.I've already started work on my personal statement and I've been doing additional reading around the subject.

Hope to see more of you on here soon
Just curious, what has attracted you to those schools in particular?
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neurofreak
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Hi I want to do neuroscience as well but not sure with ABBC :/ Anyone help ?
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smozsolution
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(Original post by vildeung)
Just curious, what has attracted you to those schools in particular?
I fell in love with both Manchester and Leeds on the open days, I thought the departments were absolutely superb. The other universities I like as institutions as I'm yet to visit them so they could change.

Although, I may consider UCL now as my results today were far better than anticipated. I just didn't like the feel of the university when I was there. It's 2nd best in the world for neuroscience but I didn't like the pretentious environment and it didn't feel as relaxed and friendly as Manchester/Leeds on the open day I went to last year.
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Lularose83
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(Original post by neurofreak)
Hi I want to do neuroscience as well but not sure with ABBC :/ Anyone help ?
Hi sorry for the late reply, but those grades are really good, well done! They're fine for neuroscience, make sure you get AAA predictions. Where do you think you'll apply?
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smozsolution
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(Original post by neurofreak)
Hi I want to do neuroscience as well but not sure with ABBC :/ Anyone help ?
(Original post by Lularose83)
Hi sorry for the late reply, but those grades are really good, well done! They're fine for neuroscience, make sure you get AAA predictions. Where do you think you'll apply?
The bit in bold isn't necessarily true. Not all universities for neuroscience require AAA, quite a few do but not all. Best thing to do is check on UCAS and specific universities for entry requirements and see what your teachers are willing to predict you.
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