A-level subjects unrelated to university course?

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paddyf97
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Hi everyone,

Last year I completed my AS year, i studied psychology, applied ict aswell as btec national sport.

I had literally no idea what i wanted to do with myself in career terms when choosing my subjects in sixth form, until before christmas last year i had looked deeply into quantity surveying and decided it was the path i definitely wanted to go down.

This has lead me to worry that i wont be accepted into university for quantity surveying as my subjects are completely unrelated. I have looked around and for example, LJMU states 270 ucas points are needed with no subject specific requirements.

Does anyone have any experience or know of people being offered university places unrelated to their a level subjects?

Thanks
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H0PEL3SS
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(Original post by paddyf97)
Hi everyone,

Last year I completed my AS year, i studied psychology, applied ict aswell as btec national sport.

I had literally no idea what i wanted to do with myself in career terms when choosing my subjects in sixth form, until before christmas last year i had looked deeply into quantity surveying and decided it was the path i definitely wanted to go down.

This has lead me to worry that i wont be accepted into university for quantity surveying as my subjects are completely unrelated. I have looked around and for example, LJMU states 270 ucas points are needed with no subject specific requirements.

Does anyone have any experience or know of people being offered university places unrelated to their a level subjects?

Thanks
Yeah, it's fine. A friend of mine got offers for QS this year, doing Biology, History and Psychology. It would be better to do your own research about quantity surveying yourself and to make sure that your PS reflects this.
Also, shadowing or some form of work experience goes a long way to making you a better applicant.
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User1880957
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(Original post by paddyf97)
Hi everyone,

Last year I completed my AS year, i studied psychology, applied ict aswell as btec national sport.

I had literally no idea what i wanted to do with myself in career terms when choosing my subjects in sixth form, until before christmas last year i had looked deeply into quantity surveying and decided it was the path i definitely wanted to go down.

This has lead me to worry that i wont be accepted into university for quantity surveying as my subjects are completely unrelated. I have looked around and for example, LJMU states 270 ucas points are needed with no subject specific requirements.

Does anyone have any experience or know of people being offered university places unrelated to their a level subjects?

Thanks
Yep! Totally understandable because when you start a levels you don't really know exactly what you want to go into career wise later in life. From personal experience, I chose maths, physics, chemistry and biology, kind of determined to get into medicine but when I had finished year 12, thinking about what course I was going to apply for I was a little unsure about my commitment to medicine. The main reason I picked law was the fact that I still wanted to have a huge influence to peoples lives', and have an academic career, but also that the working hours are more sociable in comparison to medicine. I say in comparison to medicine, because they still are long hours but there aren't many night shifts aha. Another thing that attracted me to law is the HUGE amount of skills you develop, yes in a medical related degree you memorise and understand some scientific terms, but in a law degree you develop communication, writing, interactions with clients and all these different skills, and of course the knowledge of the law aha! With medicine, despite the general perspective, treating patients etc etc, developing empathy and so on, this is true in an idealistic world, but from my experience, in real life, especially with the way the NHS is going at the moment, there isn't a lot of time to be sympathetic or empathize with patients, its kinda like an in... now get them out as quickly as possible scenario (no offence to medics aha). Lawyers work privately, so have more time to interact and develop a relationship with a client at the end of the day!
Oh wow, just realised I haven't included ANY paragraphs... sorry aha
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paddyf97
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(Original post by H0PEL3SS)
Yeah, it's fine. A friend of mine got offers for QS this year, doing Biology, History and Psychology. It would be better to do your own research about quantity surveying yourself and to make sure that your PS reflects this.
Also, shadowing or some form of work experience goes a long way to making you a better applicant.
Thanks for your reply.
Is it true if you meet the ucas requirements you are likely to be offered a place? Afterall, the university is given £15,000 per student. Also do you think the fact general studies is accepted increases the likelihood of me being offered a place? I was surprised it was accepted as QS can be a very rewarding course
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paddyf97
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(Original post by Conor Walsh)
Yep! Totally understandable because when you start a levels you don't really know exactly what you want to go into career wise later in life. From personal experience, I chose maths, physics, chemistry and biology, kind of determined to get into medicine but when I had finished year 12, thinking about what course I was going to apply for I was a little unsure about my commitment to medicine. The main reason I picked law was the fact that I still wanted to have a huge influence to peoples lives', and have an academic career, but also that the working hours are more sociable in comparison to medicine. I say in comparison to medicine, because they still are long hours but there aren't many night shifts aha. Another thing that attracted me to law is the HUGE amount of skills you develop, yes in a medical related degree you memorise and understand some scientific terms, but in a law degree you develop communication, writing, interactions with clients and all these different skills, and of course the knowledge of the law aha! With medicine, despite the general perspective, treating patients etc etc, developing empathy and so on, this is true in an idealistic world, but from my experience, in real life, especially with the way the NHS is going at the moment, there isn't a lot of time to be sympathetic or empathize with patients, its kinda like an in... now get them out as quickly as possible scenario (no offence to medics aha). Lawyers work privately, so have more time to interact and develop a relationship with a client at the end of the day!
Oh wow, just realised I haven't included ANY paragraphs... sorry aha
Hi thanks for your reply,
Yeah i kinda regret the subjects i picked now, mainly btec sport as i wanted to keep open the option of going down the sport pathway but was unable go choose a level p.e in my sixth form as the classes clashed with my ict a level.

My main worry is that i never picked maths which is the most related subject to quantity surveying. Psychology could possibly help me due to the extensive essay writing required aswell as developing skills such as looking into detail and making evaluations, and of course applied ict as ict is becoming a massive part of most careers. But kinda been worrying that the btec sport will ruin any chance of being accepted into quantity surveying as i no longer want to go down the sport pathway
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H0PEL3SS
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(Original post by paddyf97)
Thanks for your reply.
Is it true if you meet the ucas requirements you are likely to be offered a place? Afterall, the university is given £15,000 per student. Also do you think the fact general studies is accepted increases the likelihood of me being offered a place? I was surprised it was accepted as QS can be a very rewarding course
I don't know much about the course, so I'm not the right person to ask. As a rule of thumb, if you meet the requirements, it doesn't guarantee an offer. The course is a niche one, and in that sense can be rewarding, as the supply of graduates is low, assuming graduates of other courses aren't suitable.
General studies being accepted would imply it has less than huge numbers of applicants, so yes, it might.
As always when it comes to uni applications, it depends on you.
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