Review Content for my Comet Infographic Watch

pealo86
Badges: 0
Rep:
?
#1
Report Thread starter 3 years ago
#1
I've been hard at work in recent months on an infographic that details the anatomy of a comet... I'm a graphic designer and this is a fun little side-project of mine. It's only quite basic in terms of information

Astronomy is something I've always found pretty fascinating but I'm far from an expert. So I thought I'd post the content of my infographic on here just to check I've got the right idea, and not got anything drastically wrong! The content that I've come up with is based on my own research that I've done online.

If anyone could let me know what they think that'd be much appreciated:

01/ Nucleus — Sometimes referred to as a ‘dirty snowball’, the nucleus is the centre of a comet—made up of rock, dust, and frozen gases. As the comet gets closer to the sun, these gases sublimate and form the ‘coma’ around the comet.

02/ Coma — The high-energy particles from the solar wind interact with the ice and dust from the comet’s nucleus, resulting in a fuzzy appearance known as a coma. A coma will form a cloud around the comet and will typically grow in size as the comet approaches the sun.

03/ Ion Tail — A bright tail composed of ionised gas molecules. The ion tail is pushed by the solar wind, resulting in it being straight and always and pointing directly away from the sun. Ion and dust tails can extend vast distances, with the longest recorded being over 570 million kilometres in*length.

04/ Dust Tail — A tail mostly made up of dust particles, released from the nucleus as the ices are vaporised by the sun. The dust tail curves around the orbital path of the comet.

Does that all sounds about right? I'm a little confused about the lengths of the tails, not sure if that world record is strictly for an ion tail or a dust tail? or both?

And incase you're wondering what the infographic looks like... here it is!

Name:  is-anybody-out-there-v08-07082015.jpg
Views: 69
Size:  168.6 KB
0
reply
Joinedup
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#2
Report 3 years ago
#2
(Original post by pealo86)
I've been hard at work in recent months on an infographic that details the anatomy of a comet... I'm a graphic designer and this is a fun little side-project of mine. It's only quite basic in terms of information

Astronomy is something I've always found pretty fascinating but I'm far from an expert. So I thought I'd post the content of my infographic on here just to check I've got the right idea, and not got anything drastically wrong! The content that I've come up with is based on my own research that I've done online.

If anyone could let me know what they think that'd be much appreciated:

01/ Nucleus — Sometimes referred to as a ‘dirty snowball’, the nucleus is the centre of a comet—made up of rock, dust, and frozen gases. As the comet gets closer to the sun, these gases sublimate and form the ‘coma’ around the comet.

02/ Coma — The high-energy particles from the solar wind interact with the ice and dust from the comet’s nucleus, resulting in a fuzzy appearance known as a coma. A coma will form a cloud around the comet and will typically grow in size as the comet approaches the sun.

03/ Ion Tail — A bright tail composed of ionised gas molecules. The ion tail is pushed by the solar wind, resulting in it being straight and always and pointing directly away from the sun. Ion and dust tails can extend vast distances, with the longest recorded being over 570 million kilometres in*length.

04/ Dust Tail — A tail mostly made up of dust particles, released from the nucleus as the ices are vaporised by the sun. The dust tail curves around the orbital path of the comet.

Does that all sounds about right? I'm a little confused about the lengths of the tails, not sure if that world record is strictly for an ion tail or a dust tail? or both?

And incase you're wondering what the infographic looks like... here it is!

Name:  is-anybody-out-there-v08-07082015.jpg
Views: 69
Size:  168.6 KB
I guess your length for the ion tail is from https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Comet_Hyakutake (which I'm old enough to have seen) the unexpectedly long tail was a serendipitous discovery
IMO large numbers tend to become meaningless so consider expressing it in AU (which is the mean distance between earth and sun)

Maybe mention the relationship between dust tails of comets which crossed earth's orbital path in the past and meteor showers e.g. 1.https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Perseids eg.2 https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Orionids
1
reply
pealo86
Badges: 0
Rep:
?
#3
Report Thread starter 3 years ago
#3
(Original post by Joinedup)
I guess your length for the ion tail is from https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Comet_Hyakutake (which I'm old enough to have seen) the unexpectedly long tail was a serendipitous discovery
IMO large numbers tend to become meaningless so consider expressing it in AU (which is the mean distance between earth and sun)

Maybe mention the relationship between dust tails of comets which crossed earth's orbital path in the past and meteor showers e.g. 1.https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Perseids eg.2 https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Orionids
Thanks for your feedback

Yup that's the comet it's referring to anyway (I read about it on a couple other sites)

Ah yes I was thinking of expressing the distance in AU however I realised I'd need to explain the definition of AU within the poster... I think using KM will get across the whole 'incomprehensibly vast' kind of feel that I was going for to those who aren't familiar with astronomy

That's interesting about the dust tails of comets and meteor showers... hadn't thought of that so it will make a nice addition! Afterall I was getting frustrated at how little text there was in the Dust Tail section :P

So I've revised that bit like so:

04/ Dust Tail

A tail mostly made up of dust particles, released from the nucleus as the ices are vaporised by the sun. The dust tail curves around the orbital path of the comet.

Some comets leave enough debris in their wake to result in meteor showers visible in our nighttime sky as the Earth passes through the comet’s orbit. The most prolific example being The Perseids associated with the comet Swift‑Tuttle.
0
reply
Joinedup
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#4
Report 3 years ago
#4
Ah yes I was thinking of expressing the distance in AU however I realised I'd need to explain the definition of AU within the poster... I think using KM will get across the whole 'incomprehensibly vast' kind of feel that I was going for to those who aren't familiar with astronomy
IMO getting the numbers right but still being incomprehensible is a bit of a fail for an infographic... when you could (for example) compare it to the average distance between the sun and mars (227.92 x106 km) which will probably be immediately more meaningful for anyone interested enough in astronomy to read your poster at all.
0
reply
Profesh
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#5
Report 3 years ago
#5
Just make sure when researching "long tail" on Google that you don't inadvertently wind up trapped in some Matroshkya-esque, infinitely branching SEO rabbit-hole.
0
reply
X

Quick Reply

Attached files
Write a reply...
Reply
new posts
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise

University open days

  • Cardiff University
    Undergraduate Open Day Undergraduate
    Wed, 27 Mar '19
  • University of Portsmouth
    Postgraduate and Part-Time Open Evenings Postgraduate
    Wed, 27 Mar '19
  • Middlesex University London
    Postgraduate Open Evening Postgraduate
    Wed, 27 Mar '19

How old were you when you first saw porn?

I've never seen it (122)
21.11%
Before I was 12 (199)
34.43%
13 (89)
15.4%
14 (70)
12.11%
15 (39)
6.75%
16 (17)
2.94%
17 (6)
1.04%
18 (5)
0.87%
Between the ages of 19 - 24 (7)
1.21%
Over 25 (1)
0.17%
12 (23)
3.98%

Watched Threads

View All