Too many exams, too little time? Watch

OrionMusicNet
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#1
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Having gotten rid of January exams, rather than just cap the amount of resits, it means that exam schedules seem to be extremely packed and for little good reason as well. With my A-levels next year this will be likely be my exam timetable:
8th June - Maths Mechanics
20th June - Economics Unit 5
21st June - Maths C3
22nd June - Computing Unit 3
23rd June - Economics Unit 3
24th June - Maths C4

So basically my exams are all in one week and mine isn't actually that bad in comparison to some people who have two exams on one day and others with exam clashes. My question is what good does it do to get rid of January exams instead of having resits and even without January exams why have they squashed so many a level exams into June when they could have been spread out over May and June? Surely squashing all of the exams into small time periods just increases the chance of exam clashes and is clearly putting some people at a disadvantage having to revise two subjects for the day after.

This can of course be avoided if you prepare early and work hard throughout the year but with exam schedules like this it just makes things unnecessarily difficult by giving people less and less time to revise subjects that are often completely unrelated. I don't mind them making them making tests more difficult because UMS will always end up adjusting for that (assuming they don't cut the percentage of people who can get top grades) but with what they have done I feel as if it is not letting people perform to the best of their ability, increasing student's stress / likelihood of panic producing false representations of student's ability and just ultimately serving no real purpose.

I am curious to hear what other people's thoughts are on this because this has been getting on my nerves since GCSE and I still don't think I have heard a good answer as to why this has been done.
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Detiri17
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Makes them harder, I had 10 this year
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OrionMusicNet
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(Original post by Detiri17)
Makes them harder, I had 10 this year
Yeah but they should just make the tests themselves harder because these hectic exam schedules just give people even less time to memorise things. For maths that isn't such a problem but for other subjects like History or Biology surely people are being put at an unfair disadvantage?
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Detiri17
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(Original post by OrionMusicNet)
Yeah but they should just make the tests themselves harder because these hectic exam schedules just give people even less time to memorise things. For maths that isn't such a problem but for other subjects like History or Biology surely people are being put at an unfair disadvantage?
The exams are getting harder on the whole as well. I haven't really given it much thought before just because that's how it is and you've gotta do it
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OGGUS
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(Original post by OrionMusicNet)
Having gotten rid of January exams, rather than just cap the amount of resits, it means that exam schedules seem to be extremely packed and for little good reason as well. With my A-levels next year this will be likely be my exam timetable:
8th June - Maths Mechanics
20th June - Economics Unit 5
21st June - Maths C3
22nd June - Computing Unit 3
23rd June - Economics Unit 3
24th June - Maths C4

So basically my exams are all in one week and mine isn't actually that bad in comparison to some people who have two exams on one day and others with exam clashes. My question is what good does it do to get rid of January exams instead of having resits and even without January exams why have they squashed so many a level exams into June when they could have been spread out over May and June? Surely squashing all of the exams into small time periods just increases the chance of exam clashes and is clearly putting some people at a disadvantage having to revise two subjects for the day after.

This can of course be avoided if you prepare early and work hard throughout the year but with exam schedules like this it just makes things unnecessarily difficult by giving people less and less time to revise subjects that are often completely unrelated. I don't mind them making them making tests more difficult because UMS will always end up adjusting for that (assuming they don't cut the percentage of people who can get top grades) but with what they have done I feel as if it is not letting people perform to the best of their ability, increasing student's stress / likelihood of panic producing false representations of student's ability and just ultimately serving no real purpose.

I am curious to hear what other people's thoughts are on this because this has been getting on my nerves since GCSE and I still don't think I have heard a good answer as to why this has been done.
I had this for GCSE. it weren't bad. I'm going into year 12 in college btw. And it was kinda fun too. And I had a nervous breakdown on my first exam(it was on my 16th birthday).
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username1221160
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There was a time when all A level exams were sat at the end of two years. Sitting two 3 hour exams on the same day was common. Competent students dealt with it by making sure they knew the entire syllabus off by heart before the exam period. I don't see a problem with it, it is a good way of separating the wheat from the chaff.
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EastGuava
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I think it would've been great to have January exams because:
1. I would have started revising earlier
2. I would have worked harder for my exams in June having already failed the January ones.
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ETRC
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If you know your stuff you should be fine in general. I had 6 exams in a week and my first few were fine but I made a few uncommon (for me) mistakes in the last 2 because of over working between exams. I knew others have the same timetable so did not really complain or anything.
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OrionMusicNet
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(Original post by ETRC)
If you know your stuff you should be fine in general. I had 6 exams in a week and my first few were fine but I made a few uncommon (for me) mistakes in the last 2 because of over working between exams. I knew others have the same timetable so did not really complain or anything.
Hmm well it still annoys me but fair enough I guess.
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