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This thread will be a repository containing information on Africa for people interested in Africa's development.

I felt that you guys needed to know how the whole continent is shaping up, so I've made this thread for your leisure.

How this thread will work:

Each country, institution and major source will occupy a spot in the spoiler below, and every post made in reference to any country or institution will have its post number and a link to that specific post attached to an index in the spoiler. This will make it much easier for you to access the thread as it becomes more convoluted in the future.

Indexes
Spoiler:
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Every thing posted will receive a unique ID and will appear below a given country
I'm going to add new countries later on

North Africa
  • Morocco - MOR
  • Algeria - ALG
  • Egypt - EGY
  • Tunisia - TUN
East Africa
  • Ethiopia - ETH
  • Somalia - SOM
  • Sudan - SUD
  • Uganda - UGA
  • Rwanda - RWA
  • Kenya - KEN
  • Tanzania - TAN
  • Djibouti - DJI
West Africa
  • Ghana - GH
  • Ivory Coast - IC
  • Nigeria - NIG
  • Togo - TOG
  • Mali - MAL
South Africa
  • South Africa - SA
  • Mozambique - MOZ
  • Angola - ANG
  • DR Congo - DR
African Union and institutions
  • African Union - AU
  • West African Union - ECO
  • East African Union - EAC
  • North African union - AMU
  • Southern African Union - SADC
  • Central African Union - ECCAS
  • African Development Bank - ADB
News sources
  • Bloomberg - BLM
  • Financial Times - FT
  • The Economist - ECON
Every week I’ll compile a collection of posts containing videos on Africa and articles from the Economist, FT, Bloomberg or any other major source.

In another spoiler below, I’ll create indexes for each week and each week will have entries consisting of the post numbers and relevant links to the posts made.
Spoiler:
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Week1
Posts: 1, 2 , 12

Week2

Week3

Week4

Types of information this thread will contain:
  • News on projects underway/proposed
  • General news on the development of specific African countries
  • Economic statistics on Africa
  • News on Africa as a whole or anything else pertaining to Africa’s development that I haven't already stated
I'll be updating this thread once a week.

If any of you wanna help that's fine just make sure to index everything accordingly.


This thread is still under construction.
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Bushido Brown
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The rise of Africapitalism - ECON Week 1
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In 2015 the African entrepreneur will emerge on to the global stage, as a new generation shows the world what those of us doing business in Africa have long known: that our continent is home to some of the most exciting and innovative entrepreneurial talent.

From advanced mobile-payment systems to new agricultural-insurance models, we are already seeing how entrepreneurship is transforming Africa. But in Africa, business growth alone is not the full story. It is perhaps not even the most important part. Entrepreneurship matters especially for its potential to transform society.

For centuries, the continent was impoverished by the extraction of raw materials by colonial powers. Africa was unable to generate or sustain its own wealth, as it was forced to buy finished goods created with African resources at premium prices. And it lacked basic infrastructure except for the roads and ports built to move exports. If Africa is to transcend that chapter of its history and realise its economic potential, it must first become self-sufficient—and the private sector is vital to this process.

Imagine the same continent filled with businesses that can process crude oil into petroleum, cocoa pods into chocolate and cotton lint into fabric, all while retaining the finished-goods premium instead of sending wealth overseas. The term “Africapitalism” describes the process of transforming private investment into social wealth. As homegrown businesses meet social and economic needs by creating goods and services with an innate understanding of the local environment, they can bring private capital to vital infrastructure like road transport and power generation. And they can create jobs for Africans, which will in turn create an African middle class—a new generation of African consumers.

Entrepreneurial energy and inventiveness also have the potential to tackle pressing social problems in new ways. In recognition of the far-reaching impact such new methods can have, we will be providing $100m to 10,000 entrepreneurs across Africa through the soon-to-be-launched Tony Elumelu Entre*preneurship Programme. By democratising access to opportunity, with an emphasis on tapping into the talent of Africa’s young people, this programme strives to “institutionalise luck”, which is a key factor in the success of any *entrepreneur.

Young entrepreneurs and those they inspire are the lifeblood of Africa’s rise. Simdul Shagaya, a serial entrepreneur from Nigeria, built his first business monetising advertising space on toll roads in Lagos before selling that company to set up Konga, a leading Nigerian online retailer. Mr Shagaya has introduced innovations that surmount Nigeria’s limited capacity for online payments and door-to-door postal delivery service.

Mike Macharia, a Kenyan tech entrepreneur, has built Seven Seas Technology into a pan-African company with operations in east, west and southern Africa. He outcompetes vendors from more traditional global IT markets, and last year bought a Portuguese technology company to gain access to their software and services.

And then there’s Funke Okpeke, who left a lucrative telecoms career in New York to assist the construction of 7,000km (4,350 miles) of fibre-optic submarine cables from Portugal to the coast of west Africa through her company, MainOne. The resulting increase in bandwidth has had a multiplying economic impact across the region.

Way beyond business

The promise of entrepreneurs like these reaches much wider than the business arena. They have the potential to transform leadership at home. Already, they are engaged in discussions with Africa’s political leaders *on policy issues, pushing in particular for the streamlining of processes that will allow quicker business startups.

And their influence can reach beyond Africa. At the US-Africa Summit held in Washington, DC, in August, Takunda Chingonzo, a 21-year-old tech entrepreneur from Zimbabwe, elicited the promise of a review from President Barack Obama by challenging him about the negative impact of American sanctions on Zimbabwean entrepreneurs. Mr Chin*gonzo proved the game-changing potential in the young African entrepreneur that day.

African entrepreneurs will play a central role in bringing together private wealth and public need. They will prove a key tenet of Africapitalism: that it is both necessary and possible for entrepreneurs and society to prosper simultaneously. The transformative impact of economic growth unleashed by a fully *empowered, socially conscious entrepreneurial class will dwarf the results achieved by the previous aid-driven approach to *Africa’s development.
Source
Foundation website

Tony O. Elumelu at SAID Business School - Oxford University


Foreign investment in Africa - ECON
Spoiler:
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A sub-Saharan scramble
Private-equity investors are getting hot for Africa. Businesses there need all the capital on offer, and more.
Image
WHEN Paul Kavuma began approaching private companies in Africa a decade ago to suggest investing in their businesses and improving the way they were run, he was often shown the door. “They were offended, asking if I thought they were broke,” says the founder of Catalyst Principal Partners, an east Africa-focused fund manager. Even when, after hours of explaining the merits of private equity, Mr Kavuma changed business owners’ minds, many still struggled with the idea that within a few years he would sell the stake he had bought. “When we exited, some people thought we had lost confidence in them, rather than that we’d finished what we’d come to do,” he says.

Today, much has changed. African entrepreneurs now boast about being approached by one of the many private-equity investors scouring the continent for opportunities. And it is the financiers, or at least those from beyond Africa, who are having to adapt. Money managers on Wall Street and in the City of London are taking crash courses in Swahili and learning to find Ouagadougou on a map.

A decade ago, African countries were among the beneficiaries of a broader boom in investment in emerging markets worldwide. The financial crisis of 2007-08 put paid to that. Now, many private-equity funds are making Africa a primary target, and record amounts are being raised to invest in businesses there (see chart 1). On January 12th Helios Partners, a London-based firm, said it had raised the first Africa fund worth more than $1 billion. Abraaj, a rival, is expected to follow suit soon.
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In some respects it is no surprise that Africa has become such a popular destination for business investment. It certainly needs more capital—an extra $90 billion a year for infrastructure alone, the World Bank reckons. Consumer demand is growing, and industries are being liberalised. A few years ago people would ask “Why the hell are you in Africa?” says Robert van Zwieten of EMPEA, an industry body. Now they ask “Why the hell aren’t you?”

Such signs of groupthink are worrying enough in themselves. And there are plenty of other reasons to be sceptical about the current enthusiasm for Africa. Beside the “frontier market” risks private-equity investors will face–bullets, corruption, disease–they often struggle to find deals big enough to interest them. Large funds usually want to buy businesses worth more than $100m, but last year there were only seven such deals, and about half the firms bought were worth less than $10m.

Even when a potential deal is identified, family owners are often unwilling to relinquish control and incumbent managers are reluctant to make room for newcomers. Since banks still see Africa as full of risks, it is also difficult for private-equity firms to load a newly acquired business with debt, their usual technique for magnifying their returns. Another of their customary practices—selling a company after about five years of expanding it and improving its performance—is also hard. Local partners are often unwilling to sell, and undeveloped or non-existent local stockmarkets make it hard to unload a stake by means of a listing.

The private-equity managers who have done well so far have had to put boots on the ground and exercise more care and patience than is typical in their industry. “There are not many $100m deals for sale, but plenty of $100m opportunities to bolt together,” says Hurley Doddy of ECP, a pan-African investor. Tope Lawani of Helios agrees that investors who complain about a paucity of big deals lack imagination. His fund pieced together Helios Towers, a big pan-African operator of mobile-telecoms masts, from smaller businesses.

One thing successful managers agree on is that investors should not expect to fly in, do a deal and fly out again. The funds that are doing well are those with a strong understanding of local conditions and good business connections in their target countries, such as Catalyst. It looks for midsized companies (worth $5m-20m) that cater to the emerging consumer in east Africa, such as ChemiCotex, a maker of toothpaste and other toiletries it bought in 2011.

Much early investment went into businesses based on fixed assets, such as mobile-phone masts. Now retailers, packagers, restaurants and payment systems are sought after (see chart 2). In 2012 ECP invested in Nairobi Java House, a Kenyan coffee-house chain, and has since helped it to build Planet Yogurt, a group of frozen-yogurt outlets. In 2013 Helios bought 1,600 franchised Shell petrol stations across sub-Saharan Africa, not just to get into the fuel business but also to develop the convenience shops attached to the stations.
Image
Some private-equity money is going into private health clinics and educational institutions such as universities. In much of the rich world, bringing the profit motive into public services is controversial; in Africa, where there is so much unmet need for such services, there is less of a taboo. In general, African entrepreneurs have begun to appreciate how private equity can help their businesses expand and, by improving such things as internal auditing and book-keeping, make them more robust. The rich world’s negative association of private equity with asset-stripping “vultures” does not apply here.

Often, those African firms bought by private equity had been relatively well-run by their founders, albeit in a rather seat-of-the-pants fashion. The incoming investors can often boost their performance by, for instance, improving the measurement and analysis of data. They can also provide cash to modernise businesses and make them more efficient. For example, investors in IHS Towers, another big operator of telecoms masts, found that it could cut the $3,000-4,000 average monthly cost of operating masts by almost one-third, by updating their diesel generators or replacing them with solar panels.

The sort of business that investors are keenest on is one that is already a champion in its home market and has prospects of becoming a regional or global champion. Carlyle, an American private-equity firm with a $698m pot devoted to Africa, is buying a majority stake in South Africa’s largest tyre retailer, Tiger, and plans to expand it rapidly into neighbouring countries.

Since such firms are not easy to find, and since it takes patience to expand them across a continent with so many languages, cultures and legal systems, private equity’s usual practice of selling after about five years may not always be best suited to Africa. Ahmed Heikal of Qalaa Holdings, an Egyptian firm, has concluded that it is not. His firm has abandoned the private-equity model and now follows a strategy of buy, improve and hold. When you finally come across a promising asset, why sell it prematurely, he asks?

Mr Heikal says he is already doing well from his investment in Rift Valley Railways, a rail line from Kenya to Uganda. But he is more interested in its long-term potential to be one of the region’s main routes for transporting oil. His firm’s 15-20-year planning horizon means he is happy to sit and wait for this potential to be realised.

Despite the recent flurry of fund-raising, only about 1% of global private equity goes to Africa. Even so, too much money is pouring into too few funds, chasing the few big deals on offer. Besides, with commodities tumbling, currencies stumbling and political unrest rumbling, Africa’s sunny growth projections have become more tempered. This is no bad thing, say some fund managers: it will scare off fair-weather investors and bring down the prices of overvalued businesses.

Those brave enough to run the risks will need to roll up their sleeves and look for opportunities beyond those firms listed on their Bloomberg terminals. Those who know their Mali from their Malawi, and Mauritania from Mauritius, will be better placed to succeed in the scramble for African businesses than those who do not.
Source - http://www.economist.com/news/busine...ed-all-capital

African economic growth
The twilight of the resource curse? - ECON
Spoiler:
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Africa’s growth is being powered by things other than commodities
Image
FOR decades commodity prices have shaped Africa’s economic growth. The continent is home to a third of the planet’s mineral reserves, a tenth of the oil and it produces two-thirds of the diamonds. Little wonder then that, as a rule, when prices for natural resources and export crops have been high, growth has been good; when they have dipped, so has the continent’s economy (see chart 1).
Image
Over the past decade Africa was among the world’s fastest-growing continents—its average annual rate was more than 5%—buoyed in part by improved governance and economic reforms. Commodity prices were also high. In previous cycles African economies have crashed when the prices of minerals, oil and other commodities have fallen. In 1998-99, during an oil-price fall, Nigeria’s naira lost 80% of its value. African currencies again took a beating during a period of turmoil in commodity markets in 2009.

Since last year the price of oil has fallen by half and many metals such as copper and iron ore have also dropped sharply. With commodity prices plunging, will the usual pattern repeat itself?

In some economies large drops in commodity prices have led to currency falls. At least ten African currencies dropped by more than 10% in 2014. But there have been few catastrophic depreciations. This suggests that investors do not see lower commodity prices as a kiss of death. Ghana’s currency, the cedi, was the continent’s worst-performing currency in 2014, having lost 26% against the dollar. But it tumbled not because investors fret about the impact of lower commodity prices. In fact, Ghana is by African standards not especially commodity-dependent (see map). Rather, it has in recent years run a lax fiscal policy. In 2013 its budget deficit hit 10% of GDP.
Image

The mall, not the mine

One reason currencies have been robust may be because economic growth is starting to come from other places. Manufacturing output in the continent is expanding as quickly as the rest of the economy. Growth is even faster in services, which expanded at an average rate of 2.6% per person across Africa between 1996 and 2011. Tourism, in particular, has boomed: the number of foreign visitors doubled and receipts tripled between 2000 and 2012. Many countries, including Ethiopia, Ghana, Kenya, Mozambique and Nigeria, have recently revised their estimates of GDP to account for their growing non-resource sectors.

Despite falling commodity prices, the outlook also seems favourable. Wonks at the World Bank reckon that Sub-Saharan Africa’s economy will expand by about 5% this year. Telecommunications, transportation and finance are all expected to spur economic growth.

What explains Africa’s increasing economic diversification? A big pickup in investment helps. That has arisen partly because governments have worked hard to make life better for investors. The World Bank’s annual “Doing Business” report revealed that in 2013/14 sub-Saharan Africa did more to improve regulation than any other region. Mauritius is 28th on the bank’s list of the easiest places to do business. Rwanda, which 20 years ago suffered a terrible genocide, is now deemed friendlier to investors than Italy.

After two decades of poor performance, Africa’s total investment as a percentage of GDP increased after 2000. Foreign direct investment (FDI) into Africa rose by 5% in 2012 and 10% in 2013, despite global stagnation.

Ten years ago almost all FDI went to resource-rich African economies; resource-poor economies received very little (see chart 2). Resource-rich countries still receive more FDI in absolute terms; but resource-poor economies outpace them when investment is measured as a share of GDP. Foreign investors from other African countries are especially keen on non-commodity industries: nearly a third of their investments are in financial services.
Image

The most resource-intensive economies are working hard to diversify. For the past three years growth in Nigeria, Africa’s biggest economy, has exceeded 5%. You might think its growth is being powered by oil exports. Nigeria has Africa’s second-largest reserves, it is the fifth-largest exporter and, according to the IMF, oil accounts for 95% of all exports. But in recent years the Nigerian oil industry has stagnated. Growth has instead come from things like mobile phones, construction and banks. Services now represent 60% of GDP.

Angola is similar. It is Africa’s second-largest oil producer and the stuff makes up the vast majority of exports. But its 5.1% expansion in 2013 came mainly from things such as manufacturing and construction. In 2013 fishing expanded by 10%, and agriculture by 9%. About a third of government revenue now comes from non-oil sources, compared with almost nothing a decade ago, economists at Standard Bank reckon.

In Botswana the percentage of GDP made up by the mining and quarrying of goodies like diamonds, gold and copper has fallen from 46% in 2006 to 35% in 2011, according to the “African Economic Outlook”. Other countries that are successfully diversifying are Rwanda—which has thriving banks and business-services firms—and Zambia, which although still copper-dependent has posted growth of 12% a year in financial services. Congo-Brazzaville, where oil makes up 80% of exports, is seeing rapid growth in construction and transport. That may be further fuelled by the All-Africa Games, which are to be held this year in the capital, Brazzaville.

Better fiscal policy also plays an important role. Commodity markets are volatile; government spending smooths out the booms and busts. Until a few years ago, nearly all African economies spent freely when their economies were hot, only to rein in spending when things cooled down. That is the opposite of what most economists would advise a finance minister to do. But in recent years, according to a report from the World Bank published on January 7th, fiscal policies in many African countries have become more sensible. These days a fair number of African economies save money during the good times, in order to spend it in the bad ones.

There is still a long way to go. Africa is still the continent most dependent on commodity exports. Countries such as Tanzania and Nigeria want to develop giant gasfields which, while boosting the economy in the short term, could tie them more closely to commodity cycles. Some worry that investment in infrastructure will fall as mining companies retrench.

Even so, there is reason to think the “resource curse” is losing its power. Despite turmoil in commodity markets, Africa is still one of the world’s fastest-growing regions. With better education systems, investment in infrastructure and sensible regulatory reforms, the continent could completely break the spell that has held it back so often in the past.
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Barrack Obama's speech to the African union - AU Week 1



The African Economic Outlook 2015 - ADB
Lions on the move: The progress and potential of African economies - Mckinsey

Here comes Africa - FT
William Wallis
Spoiler:
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The economic and cultural revival that has shifted perceptions of sub-Saharan Africa

In March, Africa’s most populous nation provided one of the most poignant affirmations of the power of democracy since the election of Nelson Mandela in 1994 brought an end to white minority rule in South Africa. For the first time in Nigeria’s history, an incumbent (Goodluck Jonathan), beaten at relatively fair elections, bowed out gracefully, paving the way for the first transition from one elected president to another from an opposing part

By signalling their rejection of the crony capitalism and criminality that have undermined their potential, Nigerians provided a fillip to reformers across Africa at a moment when the path towards more democratic and accountable rule is strewn with bumps.

Nigeria’s election came at a pivotal moment in Africa’s evolution, when the choices that governments make are becoming more critical, and the margin for mismanagement is that much finer.

Over the past decade and a half, resource-rich countries have enjoyed consistently high prices for the commodities they have in abundance. Services and retail businesses — South African supermarkets among them — have flourished across the board as companies take advantage of a more liberal economic environment to meet the huge untapped demands of the continent’s poorly served markets.

This special issue of FT Weekend Magazine reflects on an economic and cultural revival that has shifted perceptions of sub-Saharan Africa from burden and basket case to repository of talent, resources and opportunity. But maintaining the momentum while maintaining the peace, now that commodity prices have ebbed and debts are rising again, will be a challenge, given the scale of what lies ahead.

Around 70 per cent of sub-Saharan Africans are aged under 30. Armed with mobile phones, internet access and improving flight connections, this generation is far better connected across borders than before. Few governments, be they autocratic or democratic, can afford to ignore their needs and aspirations or suppress the cross-germination of ideas.

Ethiopia is a case in point. A state-driven development model — in defiance of liberal market orthodoxies adopted by many other African states — is lifting people out of poverty. Farmers’ collectives are not supposed to work. In Ethiopia, where exceptionalism is a default position, they mostly do.

In return for the strides it is making in industrial development, service delivery and infrastructure investment, the government in Addis Ababa demands conformity. Bloggers, even when only mildly critical, can end up in jail. The elections held in May were so predictable that they will struggle to make a footnote in history. The ruling Ethiopian People’s Revolutionary Democratic Front, which draws inspiration from China’s communist party, won a clean sweep of all 546 national assembly seats. Party leaders pay only the faintest lip service to the still messy pluralism taking root elsewhere in Africa.

Ask young Ethiopians whether they accept the heavy-handed way in which their government muzzles opponents, and they regularly say no: they want development but they also want to enjoy more of the kind of freedom Nigerians have.

Getting the balance wrong has increasingly dangerous consequences — driving young people into the arms of extremists, of whom the most menacing, but by no means the only ones, are the Islamist groups terrorising a swath of Africa below the Sahara desert.

The democratic gains that some countries, including Nigeria, have made are likely to remain fragile as long as they are not accompanied by a more equitable distribution of the dividends.

The outcome in Nigeria’s March elections was far from inevitable. Many Nigerians feared an attempt by the ruling party to remain in power at all costs. The irony is that they voted for a disciplinarian, former military ruler Muhammadu Buhari, who has something in common with his Ethiopian peers, both in terms of his belief in the role the state should be playing in driving development and in his personal intolerance of corruption.

“If you run an economy in which it’s easy to make money from rent-seeking, from political connections, subsidies and contracts, you tend to end up with a more unequal society,” says Lamido Sanusi, former governor of the Central Bank of Nigeria and now emir of Kano. An admirer of Meles Zenawi, the late Ethiopian premier and former guerrilla leader, he adds: “If you create an economy in which you make money by producing real goods and services, one in which you invest in education and doctors and engineers and IT specialists, you get more even distribution.”

The combination of more even distribution and greater political freedom might begin to unleash the true potential. The question still, tortuously, is whether the two are mutually exclusive.

William Wallis is the FT’s African affairs writer

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Ghana - GH
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List of infrastructure projects + info
Construction - Accra, Tema and Kumasi
ACCRA | Ashesi University Expansion | U/C
ACCRA |University of Ghana Expansion | planned
ACCRA | University of Ghana Teaching Hospital | U/C
ACCRA | Project Sunrise | 4* hotel |U/C
Tema| ICT Park (limited info) U/C
Accra|National Data Centre | U/C
Accra Ridge Hospital Refurbishment + school of Anaesthesia(University of Ghana) U/C
ACCRA | Appalonia City | Mixed-Use | Approved
ACCRA | Switchback Park / Adinkra Heights | U/C
ACCRA|The Gallery|U/C
ACCRA | Ghana national petroleum company | planned
ACCRA | One Airport Square | T/O
ACCRA | Accra Financial Centre | 7 F | U/C
ACCRA | Standard Chartered Head Office | 20 fl | planned
Accra| Eco Bank Ghana HQ | U/C
ACCRA | Kempinski Gold Coast Hotel | 250 rooms | U/C
ACCRA|Pearl in City|U/C
Accra | Nyame Dua Project ~ 5000 affordable homes | U/C
Kumasi | Kumasi Central Market Project |Approved
Construction - rest of Ghana
Developmental and Social Projects
VOLTA REGION/HO | University Of Health And Allied Science | U/C



Transport
ACCRA | Kotoka International Airport Terminal 3 | U/C
ACCRA| Kwame Nkrumah Circle Interchange| U/C
Tamale | Tamale International Airport |U/C
Road projects U/C compiled by the Ghanaian gov

Energy
Energy industry News: Production, Development and Updates

Industrial
WESTERN REGION | Atuabo Free Port | U/C
Oil Industry News: Production, Development and Updates

Reports
Ghana economic outlook - ADB 2015
IMF Country Report No. 15/103 - April 2015
Latest news + info
Ghana Targets Budget Deficit of 5.75% in 2016, IMF Says - 4th sept 2015
Ghana Central Bank Sees Cedi Gaining on 4th Quarter Inflows - Aug 21st 2015
Ghana Credit-Rating Upgrade Is a Long-Term Goal, Terkper Says - Aug 12th 2015
Ghana to Narrow Fiscal Gap More Than Expected, Mahama Says - Aug 12th 2015
Bourses From Accra to Lagos Unite in Cross-Border Trading - Aug 7th 2015
Ghana May Narrow Budget Deficit Target After Lowering Spending - July 17th 2015
Ghana on Track to Meeting Budget-Deficit Target, IMF Says - June 30th 2015
Ghana President Says Economy Remains Robust(video) - 3 March 2014 - BLM
President John Dramani Mahama On Ghana’s Depreciating Currency | US-Africa Leaders Summit(video) - BLM


Miscellaneous
City Gallery
An Economic History Of Ghana: Reflections on a Half-Century of Challenges & Progress
Will be updated weekly
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Kenya - KEN
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List of infrastructure projects + info
Construction - Nairobi, Mombasa, Malindi and Lamu
Nairobi - Directory of Projects ~50 projects U/C compiled nicely.
KENYA | Konza Technology City | U/C + info
Mombasa, Malindi and Lamu projects
NAIROBI | Slum improvement projects
GIGIRI | Two Rivers | 62,000m² retail space | U/C
UPPER HILL | Upper Hill Square | 290m | 66 fl | Proposed
UPPER HILL | Akili Tower | 30 fl | Proposed
Construction - rest of Kenya
Construction projects in other counties

Transport
Standard Gauge Railway | Kenya (Nairobi, Mombasa),Uganda(Kampala) and Rwanda(Kigali) high- speed rail line | U/C + East African Railway Masterplan
Jomo Kenyatta International Airport Expansion | U/C
Transport projects
LAPSSET Corridor (Lamu Port & transport corridor) | $23billion | U/C

Energy
LAMU | Coal Power Plant | $1.2 billion | 980 MW | Approved + info
High Grand Falls Dam | 700MW | Approved
Other energy projects

Industrial
Kenya | Automotive Industry info
Kenya | Shipbuilding and Marine industry info
Kenya | Manufacturing Sector info
Kenyan Oil-Pipeline Accord With Uganda Paves Way for Exports - BLM + Kenya and Uganda are building the world’s longest heated oil pipeline - Quartz Africa
Reports
Kenya economic outlook - ADB 2015
Kenya IMF Country Report No. 14/302

Latest news
Kenyan Government Hoping To Strengthen Economic and Security Partnerships With US(video) - BLM
African survey data point to robust growth - FT
Kenya Says South Sudan’s Kiir Expected to Sign Peace Deal Today -BLM
Kenya’s Ports Authority Plans Loans for Mombasa Harbor Expansion - BLM
East Africa emerges as a trade hub - FT
Kenyan Stocks End 12 Days of Losses as Nigerian Equities Advance - BLM
Kenya Targets African Market to Boost Tourism Earnings - BLM
Kenya Starts Talks With Uganda on Financing for Oil Pipeline - BLM
Karanja Kibicho: Kenya Foreign Affairs Principle Secretary(video) - BLM
The Shift: Mobile Money Revolution (video) - BLM
Rea Trading To Explore Energy Production In Kenya(video) - BLM
Miscellaneous
Urban Kenya - Cityscapes, skylines and urban photos
journals on Africa post 16
Will be updated weekly.
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Nigeria - NIG
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List of infrastructure projects + info
Construction - Lagos + Abuja
Eko Atlantic city U/C
Lagos Marriott Hotel U/C
ABUJA | World Trade Centre | 37 fl | Mixed-Use | U/C
Madina Tower / Victoria Island – Lagos / 15 Floors U/C
Lagos| Festac Phase II | Master Plan | U/C
Nestoil Towers | Office | 14F | 75m | U/C
Wings Towers | Commercial | 17 fl x2 | U/C
N Kingstower | Commercial | 16 F | U/C
ABUJA | Sunrise Hills | Masterplan | U/C
Marina District | Afren Energy Headquarters | Office | 15F | U/C
Eko Pearl Towers |24F| U/C
Eko energy estate - U/C
Marina District | Azuri Peninsula | 26F | U/C
LAGOS | Peninsula Mall | Retail | U/C
LAGOS | Falomo Shopping Complex | Mixed-Use | Under Construction
LAGOS | Eko Guest House | Leisure | U/C
ABUJA| Stratosphere Tower | Mixed Use | 64F| - planned
Lagos sky Towers |20F| - planned
Avenues West District The One |13F| - planned
LAGOS | Ramzi Towers | Residential | 18F | -planned
Eko medical centre - planned
Construction - rest of Nigeria
Real estate dev across Nigeria

Transport Lagos + Abuja
Lagos 4th Mainland Bridge U/C
ABUJA | Light Rail | Transport | U/C
Lagos Urban rail | Blue line | 1/7 | U/C
Lagos Bus transit system U/C
Transport - rest of Nigeria
Railway expansion projects
Road rehabilitation and expansion projects

Energy
Nigeria Is in Talks With Rosatom for Nuclear Power Plants -2015
Exclusive: Nigeria favors local firms in $40 billion oil contract awards - 2014
General Electric Plans $1 Billion Investment in Nigerian Power - 2013
Privatisation of 15 state-owned energy companies - FT - 2013
List of power-plants UC/planned

Industrial
Lagos|Lekki Free Trade Zone
Lagos| Dangote Says Nigeria Lagos Refinery to Start by Mid-2018 - BLM
Nigerian auto industry
Nigerian industrial complexes

Reports:
Nigeria’s renewal: Delivering inclusive growth - Mckinsey
PwC’s economic scenarios for Nigeria for 2015 and 2016
Nigeria economic outlook - ADB 2015

Latest news + info
African survey data point to robust growth - FT
Nigeria's Sovereign Wealth Fund Profits From Tapping Dollar Investments(video) - BLM
Nigeria Plans to Double Value-Added Tax to 10% as Oil Plunges- BLM
Nigeria Bans Dollar Cash Deposits in Bid to Bolster Naira - BLM
Nigeria to Lose Billions Without Oil Sales Reforms, Report Says - BLM
Nigeria Oil & Gas Industry Outlook: Bloomberg Debate(video) - BLM
Nigeria In Focus: Agriculture Minister Dr. Akinwumi Adesina (video) - BLM
Nigeria In Focus Special: Finance, Power, Agriculture, Petroleum(video) -BLM
Nigeria In Focus: Are Foreign Mercenaries Fighting Boko Haram? (video) - BLM
New Nigerian Stock Exchange President on Increasing Liquidity in Nigeria(video) - BLM
Miscellaneous
Photography, Heritage & Architecture
journals on Africa(nigeria) post 16
Will be updated weekly.
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Bushido Brown
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Algeria - ALG
Spoiler:
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List of infrastructure projects + info
Construction - Main cities

Construction - rest of Algeria

Transport - Algeria
ALGIERS | Metro - Line 1 [10 km + 1,7 km + 4 km + 3,6 km => 19,3 km] | Under Construction + progress update (1, 2, 3, 4)

Energy

Industrial

Reports:
Algeria economic outlook - ADB 2015(English) + Full report in French
Latest news
African survey data point to robust growth - FT

Miscellaneous

Under construction

*English translation required for some sources*
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StrawbAri
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(Original post by Bushido Brown)
This thread will be a repository containing information on Africa for people interested in Africa's development.

I felt that you guys needed to know how the whole continent is shaping up, so I've made this thread for your leisure.

How this thread will work:

Each country, institution and major source will receive an index, this will allow you to navigate this thread through the search function more efficiently. I will continue to add new index's later on.

Index's
Spoiler:
Show
North Africa
  • Morocco - MOR
  • Algeria - ALG
  • Egypt - EGY
  • Tunisia - TUN
East Africa
  • Ethiopia - ETH
  • Somalia - SOM
  • Sudan - SUD
  • Uganda - UGA
  • Rwanda - RWA
  • Kenya - KEN
  • Tanzania - TAN
West Africa
  • Ghana - GH
  • Ivory Coast - IC
  • Nigeria - NIG
  • Togo - TOG
  • Mali - MAL
South Africa
  • South Africa - SA
  • Mozambique - MOZ
  • Angola - ANG
  • DR Congo - DR
African Union and institutions
  • African Union - AU
  • West African Union - ECO
  • East African Union - EAC
  • Southern African Union - SADC
  • Central African Union - ECCAS
  • African Development Bank - ADB
News sources
  • Bloomberg - BLM
  • Financial Times - FT
  • The Economist - ECON
Types of information this thread will contain:
  • News on projects underway/proposed
  • General news on the development of specific African countries
  • News on Africa as a whole or anything else pertaining to Africa’s development that I haven't already stated
I'll be updating this thread once a week.

If any of you wanna help that's fine just make sure to index everything accordingly.

This thread is still under construction.
PRSOM
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Bushido Brown
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Egypt
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List of infrastructure projects + info
Construction - Cairo + Alexandria
CAIRO | The Capital Cairo | $45bn | Approved | 2022
CAIRO l Secon Nile Towers l LE1.8bn | 2x72m | 2x23F | Residential & five-star Hilton hotel | 2016 | U/C + updates [1]
Transport - Egypt


Energy

Industrial

Reports:


Latest news + info
African survey data point to robust growth - FT

Under construction
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Bushido Brown
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Morocco
Spoiler:
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List of infrastructure projects + info
Construction - Rabat + Casablanca

Construction - rest of Morocco

Transport
TANGIER - KÉNITRA | High-Speed Rail (LGV) | 200 km | 320 km/h | #U-C (2010 - 2017)

Energy

Industrial

Reports:
Morocco Economic outlook ADB(English) + Full report in French
Latest news + info
Lamia Merzouki: Director of Strategy & Development at Casablanca Finance City(video)-BLM
Morocco Wants Reduced Agriculture Dependency To Reach 5% Growth(video) - BLM
Morocco The investment Gateway To Africa?(video) - BLM
Miscellaneous
Under construction


*English translation required for some sources*
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Bushido Brown
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South AfricaUnder construction
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Bushido Brown
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#12
Week 2
TED
Charles Robertson: Africa's next boom


BBC NEWS
China signs deal with Africa's richest man, Aliko Dangote - BBC


Bloomberg
African Business Weekly: Ivory Coast Targeting Double Digit Growth(video)

Sovereign Wealth Funds Can Ease Africa Risks, AfDB Head Says

The Economist


The Financial Times
African survey data point to robust growth

China turbulence casts shadow on Africa


Quartz Africa
STILL WORK TO DO - Africa is minting millionaires but the poor aren’t getting any richer

These industries in Africa will suffer the most in a Chinese slowdown

A simple, interactive tool shows the real size of India, China, and Africa

With a billion Africans set to shop online, a new wave of start-ups is looking to cash in

Africa’s millionaires are in Nigeria, Egypt, South Africa with some in Kenya too
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Reue
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(Original post by Bushido Brown)
reserved!1
Moved to international section
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Bushido Brown
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Tanzania
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Construction
Dar es salaam|Dar City project | U/C - go to design / featured

Transport

Energy

Industrial

Reports

Latest news

Miscellaneous
Under construction
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Neolamatrix
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#15
Awesome thread
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bigmansouf
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#16
Good reading on African thoughts about african states and what should we do http://www.jpanafrican.com/archive.htm
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bigmansouf
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Books on the economy of ghana http://www.ayebia.co.uk/products/1/a...-progress.html
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Bushido Brown
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Ivory Coast
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rkkndd
cList of infrastructure projects + infoConstruction - Main citiesConstruction - rest of AlgeriaTransport - AlgeriaALGIERS | Metro - Line 1 [10 km + 1,7 km + 4 km + 3,6 km => 19,3 km] | Under Construction + progress update (1, 2, 3, 4)EnergyIndustrialReports:Algeri a economic outlook - ADB 2015(English) + Full report in FrenchLatest newsAfrican survey data point to robust growth - FTMiscellaneous

Under construction

*English translation required for some sources*
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Bushido Brown
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Angola
Spoiler:
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Spoiler

List of infrastructure projects + infoConstruction - Main citiesConstruction - rest of AlgeriaTransport - AlgeriaALGIERS | Metro - Line 1 [10 km + 1,7 km + 4 km + 3,6 km => 19,3 km] | Under Construction + progress update (1, 2, 3, 4)EnergyIndustrialReports:Algeri a economic outlook - ADB 2015(English) + Full report in FrenchLatest newsAfrican survey data point to robust growth - FTMiscellaneous

African survey data point to robust growth - FT
Under construction

*English translation required for some sources*
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Bushido Brown
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Week 3
I may mention some African countries in this post.

TED
Telling the African Story: Komla Dumor at TEDxEuston (skip to 2:00)


Bloomberg
China Step Closer to Exporting Reactors With Africa Agreement
Kenya Regulator to Issue Policy Paper on Asset-Backed Securities

CNN
Nigeria's new World Trade Center poised to send its economy sky high
Why Nigeria's plans for a dream Eldorado city are not radical enough

Quartz Africa
Smile, the pan-African wireless ISP, has raised $365 million to expand its network
The most promising retail markets in Africa are in countries people rarely talk about
Charted: Market crashes threaten African cities more than natural disasters

Economist


Attempts to root out corruption in some African countries
Ex-Nigeria Security Adviser Appears in Court on Arms Charges - BLM
Ghana judges to be investigated over corruption allegations - BBC
Nigeria's NNPC bans 113 oil tankers from Nigerian waters - Reuters
Buhari Seeks Obama’s Aid to Recover $150 Billion in Nigeria Loot - BLM
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