MattCompo
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Hi all, I've been offered places on an integrated foundation degree at the University of Manchester and Swansea University. I have interests in aerospace and medical engineering and Swansea caters to both of those, it has better graduate prospects for both and the course structures look more interesting and suitable for me than Manchester. However Manchester has a better global reputation and it is situated in a busy area and I don't know if I'd like feeling out of the way in Swansea.

Manchester looks better for prospects, location
Swansea's course suits me more

I did go for an interview at Manchester which did have an impression on me as being very good but I have not been to Swansea yet.
With swansea I could do the foundation and choose aero or medical at the end whereas with Manchester I'm limited to Aero.

Any advice?

(P.S I also have a possible chance at Loughborough for their foundation but haven't looked too much into them yet)
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Air_wolf
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Hello good engineering sir . I think you should try swansea. A friend of mine went to south wales university and completed aircraft maintenancr degree which he said was very well taught. Personally i think manchester universities are running primarily on reputation...the teaching has become slack in recent years.
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MattCompo
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Thanks for the quick reply! Yeah I'm getting that feeling as well, ultimately I would like to work in either bioengineering research/advancement or space related engineering and Swansea offers tuition in both of those areas. I've seen loads of good reviews for swansea engineering on whatuni and not that many for Manchester. They did leave a good impression in the interview though, I'm sure Swansea would do the same though if I went there.
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Et Tu, Brute?
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One thing you should remember is that at the the first couple of years of engineering degrees tend to be very similar in terms of the content. So it doesn't matter if you are doing civil or areo, they will be similar until closer to the end. This is why you get 'general' engineering degrees...you tend to specialise in year 3 on ward I believe.

I don't quite see the point in super specific engineering degrees for undergraduate students. I think you would be better off sticking to the main branches then specialise at MSc level. So if you wanted to get into medical engineering, probably Electrical/Electronic or mechanical would be you best option. This also opens more doors prospect wise post-degree than a medical engineering degree would.

Also, I assume that you are doing a foundation YEAR not degree (completely different things btw), in which case, there is nothing stopping you from transferring after the FY.
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MattCompo
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(Original post by Et Tu, Brute?)
One thing you should remember is that at the the first couple of years of engineering degrees tend to be very similar in terms of the content. So it doesn't matter if you are doing civil or areo, they will be similar until closer to the end. This is why you get 'general' engineering degrees...you tend to specialise in year 3 on ward I believe.

I don't quite see the point in super specific engineering degrees for undergraduate students. I think you would be better off sticking to the main branches then specialise at MSc level. So if you wanted to get into medical engineering, probably Electrical/Electronic or mechanical would be you best option. This also opens more doors prospect wise post-degree than a medical engineering degree would.

Also, I assume that you are doing a foundation YEAR not degree (completely different things btw), in which case, there is nothing stopping you from transferring after the FY.
Thanks for the reply. This is true, I've heard it quite a bit. I do think that working on modules relevant to my interests in engineering would be beneficial, that's not to say I'd lack motivation due to not being interested in more general modules such as structures/dynamics etc; I want to do well in all modules. And yes I've got offers for foundations years I have heard that foundation years are catered to their universities degrees, not sure how that would affect transferring if I decided to at the end of the foundation
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Et Tu, Brute?
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(Original post by MattCompo)
Thanks for the reply. This is true, I've heard it quite a bit. I do think that working on modules relevant to my interests in engineering would be beneficial, that's not to say I'd lack motivation due to not being interested in more general modules such as structures/dynamics etc; I want to do well in all modules. And yes I've got offers for foundations years I have heard that foundation years are catered to their universities degrees, not sure how that would affect transferring if I decided to at the end of the foundation
Yeah that is a fair point, you can motivate yourself to study something you are more passionate about much better than something you are less passionate about.

One important thing to look for, that I have seen in some graduate job schemes, is accreditation. I'm not sure who would accredit the medical engineering one but it is always better to have an accredited degree. Accreditation isn't the be all and end all obviously, but if you want to be chartered then it would be better to go for the accredited course now, as it will save you some time in the future.

As for the trasnfer, yes universities can tailor their year 0s to suit the year 1s, however as I said before, most engineering degrees will have a fairly similar year 1 and even 2. The main aim of the year 0 is to bring your maths and physics up to scratch, everything else takes a backseat really. So if you get good grades on those subjects, you should be able to transfer just fine, thought not all unis will accept the FY as a qualification.
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a10
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(Original post by Et Tu, Brute?)
One thing you should remember is that at the the first couple of years of engineering degrees tend to be very similar in terms of the content. So it doesn't matter if you are doing civil or areo, they will be similar until closer to the end.
This is false information. The first year of similar disciplines will be fairly similar but projects and the like tend to be different, from year 2 onwards civil will be very very very different to aerospace.
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Et Tu, Brute?
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(Original post by a10)
This is false information. The first year of similar disciplines will be fairly similar but projects and the like tend to be different, from year 2 onwards civil will be very very very different to aerospace.
From what I've seen, comparing aero and civil, first years will take the exact same modules with exceptions in a couple. So it doesn't seem to matter if the disciplines are similar or not. Year two will be different yes, but the core content, even if it is applied to x engineering as opposed to y engineering will be similar in the sense that what you learn can be transferred across the different fields of engineering. Obviously the more course specific modules will not be similar by any stretch. I wasn't clear on that so my bad, but you did take it slightly out of context, I was making the point that in general engineering courses all students study the exact same modules in years 1 and 2, then specialise into EEE, mech., civil etc in the years 3 and 4, though despite having the exact same first 2 years, the degrees are usually is fully accredited by the ICE/ISE, IET and IME. I will admit aero vs civil was a poor example though.
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a10
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(Original post by Et Tu, Brute?)
From what I've seen, comparing aero and civil, first years will take the exact same modules with exceptions in a couple. So it doesn't seem to matter if the disciplines are similar or not. Year two will be different yes, but the core content, even if it is applied to x engineering as opposed to y engineering will be similar in the sense that what you learn can be transferred across the different fields of engineering. Obviously the more course specific modules will not be similar by any stretch. I wasn't clear on that so my bad, but you did take it slightly out of context, I was making the point that in general engineering courses all students study the exact same modules in years 1 and 2, then specialise into EEE, mech., civil etc in the years 3 and 4, though despite having the exact same first 2 years, the degrees are usually is fully accredited by the ICE/ISE, IET and IME. I will admit aero vs civil was a poor example though.
It does depend on whether the disciplines are similarly related or not. For example aerospace engineering is a more specialised version of mechanical engineering with more fluid & flight dynamics content so most of the modules will be very similar but with a different focus.

The core content and focus in latter years is in fact quite different (and gets even more different in final years) for each discipline for example in civil engineering the main focus starts being on soil mechanics/hydraulics/structures/surveying....whereas in mechanical/auto/aero engineering the focus is on control engineering/mechanical dynamics (as well as thermodynamics, design and structural mechanics). The only thing that remains common across most of the disciplines will be that you study some kind of business module where you learn project management in the engineering context and most of the mathematics tends to be roughly similar too but again the main core content will be very different for each discipline and not similar at all.

The reason general engineering degrees are still accredited by specific institutions is because it isn't actually so general as you think it is. What i mean by this is you can't just do a total random mix of modules you will be given options that are tailored to lead towards specific disciplines so in the first year you may study multi-disciplinary modules (like i did at my uni) but later on you do in fact start to follow a particular stream based on your options that will lead onto a specific discipline. So its not really 'general' all the way through but rather you start following a particular stream early on based on your interests leading to X engineering discipline.
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Et Tu, Brute?
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(Original post by a10)
The reason general engineering degrees are still accredited by specific institutions is because it isn't actually so general as you think it is. What i mean by this is you can't just do a total random mix of modules you will be given options that are tailored to lead towards specific disciplines so in the first year you may study multi-disciplinary modules (like i did at my uni) but later on you do in fact start to follow a particular stream based on your options that will lead onto a specific discipline. So its not really 'general' all the way through but rather you start following a particular stream early on based on your interests leading to X engineering discipline.
This is exactly what I said. You'll study the exact same modules for 2 years, then specialise in year 3 and 4.
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MattCompo
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That's great and all about the silmarilites between subjects, any advice on swansea vs manchester?
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Swansea University
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(Original post by MattCompo)
That's great and all about the silmarilites between subjects, any advice on swansea vs manchester?
Hi Matt,

I'm pleased that you have chosen Swansea University as one of your options. Do you have any specific questions? I will try my best to answer them for you.
It's worth mentioning that our College of Engineering will be moving to our brand new Bay Campus this September which is right on the beach, you can see more about the Bay Campus here - http://www.swansea.ac.uk/campus-development/baycampus/
I hope this helps, please let me know if you have any specific questions.
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