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    Hello everyone,

    I'm hoping I may be able to get some good advice, or pointing in the right direction concerning getting into teaching.

    My qualifications CV looks like this:

    GCSE (English Lang B, Lit B, Biology B, Maths B)
    Access to Nursing (University entry course)
    BSc Biology (1st)
    MSc Environmental Conservation Management
    PhD Animal nutrition with plant enzymes

    I would love to move into teaching, and understand that I would need a PGCE or similar, I currently live in Wales, so there are some differences.

    I have been informed by one source, that I would need to acquire an A-level in the subject I would like to teach (most likely biology). Does this sound correct to you? I have not found it in the existing (confusing) literature on websites etc.

    I would like to avoid this if possible.

    I would also prefer to either study the PGCE part time (I have a toddler) or with an 'graduate training' style course where you earn as you learn.

    I am also torn between 3 factions:

    Do I teach primary (this is my preferred area at the moment but I am unsure if it will last)

    Or Secondary (the A-Level issue is annoying)

    Or lecture (there are jobs I could take in this area - so long as they remain lecturing posts).

    Any advice on my varied questions would be much appreciated!

    Thank you,
    Gareth.
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    Usually yes you would need an A Level in the subject if you want to teach it at secondary PGCE level, I don't see there being any way around that unfortunately. So teaching Primary may be your best option if you want to avoid doing the A Level.
    I'm not sure how many PGCE's offer part time study, I don't think there's many but it mite be worth looking into. If you want to earn while you learn you could do the PGCE school direct salaried route, however for this I think you have to have had at least three years prior experience in the classroom.
    EDIT: Sorry I just realised your degree is in biology so the fact you don't have an A Level in it is probably not important. However it's worth checking the entry requirements for the unis you may be interested in.
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    There are several possibilities:

    If you want to teach secondary, you can apply for SDS/ Teach First/ HMC (the salaried route) - check how many UCAS points the access course is worth. I don't think the A Levels matter that much as you have a 1st class degree.

    If you want to go for primary, the qualification you have would be sufficient I think.

    Some places like Edge Hill and Canterbury Christ Church do have flexible/ part-time PGCE, but the block placements will be full time. I don't think anywhere will do part-time placement.

    Or you can do PGCE in Post compulsory education. Quite a number of these are part-time. You can search part-time courses on UCAS.
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    If you have a biology degree and want to teach biology you won't need A level. Lots and lots of people teach at Secondary level who don't have any A levels.


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    I got an offer for a Physics PGCE because my degree was 1/3 Physics despite the fact I didn't do A level physics (I had applied for chemistry). So with you having a degree in biology I don't think it would be a problem at all with not having the A level, especially with your other post-grad degrees.

    You're in a position where you could pursue teaching such a range of ages, have you spent much time observing? I would recommend spending as much time as possible observing primary and secondary schools to see which you prefer.
    As part of your PhD did you spend any time lecturing? My understanding is many lecturing positions also come with research (all my lecturers at uni also had individual research pursuits), would you still want to be involved with research or are you wanting to fully move into teaching?
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    hi,
    i will be starting the school direct (salaried) training in a couple of weeks so what i can advice - with limited know how - is that the qualifications you currently have will suffice for you to teach primary.
    also you can go through the pgce route, school direct or teach first. you have options as it all depends what suits your situation.
    lastly, you may not have to take the professional skills tests prior to starting the training, since you are in wales and i don't think same rules apply there. (lucky you!)
    good luck ok.
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    (Original post by Vicky_B_10)
    I got an offer for a Physics PGCE because my degree was 1/3 Physics despite the fact I didn't do A level physics (I had applied for chemistry). So with you having a degree in biology I don't think it would be a problem at all with not having the A level, especially with your other post-grad degrees.

    You're in a position where you could pursue teaching such a range of ages, have you spent much time observing? I would recommend spending as much time as possible observing primary and secondary schools to see which you prefer.
    As part of your PhD did you spend any time lecturing? My understanding is many lecturing positions also come with research (all my lecturers at uni also had individual research pursuits), would you still want to be involved with research or are you wanting to fully move into teaching?
    I applied for chemistry and got told my degree didn't have enough chemistry. Was close to 50%. That was the cut off for the uni I'm going to. Did they make you do a SKE. They were going to make me do one but then offered my Biology instead!
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    (Original post by tom_tom_tom)
    I applied for chemistry and got told my degree didn't have enough chemistry. Was close to 50%. That was the cut off for the uni I'm going to. Did they make you do a SKE. They were going to make me do one but then offered my Biology instead!
    My degree was a three-way tie between all three, so I had about 33% Chemistry, so yeah I've done a 5 month chemistry SKE course which I finished in June. Just need to brush up on my physics now, won't need as much time on biology. Glad I got a chemistry offer elsewhere, I was very nervous about the possibility of doing physics, even after a physics SKE course I think I would have struggled with subject knowledge for KS5!
 
 
 

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