archizzy
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So I was expecting slightly better AS grades today, although I didn't do too badly. I got AABC for art, french maths and physics, in that order. I was planning to drop physics anyway but I'm a bit worried about the B in maths.

On the website it says Bath gives offers to students predicted A*AA which I may be able to get with a bit of hard work. The thing is I've also heard Bath's architecture course is quite maths-based, will this be a problem when I'm applying? I genuinely really like maths and was expecting the B to be in art instead if I'm honest.

Also, any ideas of other good architecture unis to apply for? I was thinking Cambridge before but now that's out of the picture I'm thinking Sheffield, Edinburgh, UWE and UCL. Opinions?

Thanks
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Merackon
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With architecture, universities tend to move to either the more creative side or the more technical side. Bath is, as you say, a technical focussed university. Something to bear in mind about a lot of these architecture schools and what many architects I know IRL have said to me, 'a lot of these places will teach you how to get a job as an architect, not necessarily how to be an architect.' For example, I am now going to Portsmouth for architecture, having seen the courses offered at Manchester and Liverpool, and honestly thought that Portsmouth was better for me (healthy balance between technical and creative.

This is something that you need to think about when you are looking at the courses through open days etc, as the website doesn't quite convey the information that is needed to discern how good that course is going to be for you. Also, 'good' architecture universities is a statement that could take you into an extensive grey area: 'new' universities like Warwick, Portsmouth, Plymouth, Brunel etc, don't carry the kudos of the Russell Group universities. Honestly though, I found their facilities to be as good / comfortable if not better than that of places such as Manchester and Liverpool, but that is my opinion, and your views will vary depending on what kind of place you feel is right for you.Edinburgh is a renowned university for its architecture course, as is Sheffield, and indeed Bath.

Good architecture universities should be places that have good industrial connections and cover a wide range of aspects of architecture. So in this regard, you are looking at the right place for a 'good' architecture university.

Bath is a highly competitive university for architecture, so this is important to remember, hence why their entry requirements are so high. If you can get an A*AA predicted grades with your teachers, then that puts you in a good position for application. It more comes down to the fact that do YOU think that you are able to get an A in Maths next year? When I spoke to tutors throughout the various universities, they stated that being competent in maths is important, but that doesn't necessarily mean that you have to have the skills in the subject that you would find in engineering or physics sciences.

Sorry if this information is somewhat vague for you, if you have any more questions, just ask and I will try and narrow it down.
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Merackon
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http://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/show....php?t=2328399

This thread looks at the maths aspect early on, and mentions Bath specifically.
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archizzy
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(Original post by Merackon)
With architecture, universities tend to move to either the more creative side or the more technical side. Bath is, as you say, a technical focussed university. Something to bear in mind about a lot of these architecture schools and what many architects I know IRL have said to me, 'a lot of these places will teach you how to get a job as an architect, not necessarily how to be an architect.' For example, I am now going to Portsmouth for architecture, having seen the courses offered at Manchester and Liverpool, and honestly thought that Portsmouth was better for me (healthy balance between technical and creative.

This is something that you need to think about when you are looking at the courses through open days etc, as the website doesn't quite convey the information that is needed to discern how good that course is going to be for you. Also, 'good' architecture universities is a statement that could take you into an extensive grey area: 'new' universities like Warwick, Portsmouth, Plymouth, Brunel etc, don't carry the kudos of the Russell Group universities. Honestly though, I found their facilities to be as good / comfortable if not better than that of places such as Manchester and Liverpool, but that is my opinion, and your views will vary depending on what kind of place you feel is right for you.Edinburgh is a renowned university for its architecture course, as is Sheffield, and indeed Bath.

Good architecture universities should be places that have good industrial connections and cover a wide range of aspects of architecture. So in this regard, you are looking at the right place for a 'good' architecture university.

Bath is a highly competitive university for architecture, so this is important to remember, hence why their entry requirements are so high. If you can get an A*AA predicted grades with your teachers, then that puts you in a good position for application. It more comes down to the fact that do YOU think that you are able to get an A in Maths next year? When I spoke to tutors throughout the various universities, they stated that being competent in maths is important, but that doesn't necessarily mean that you have to have the skills in the subject that you would find in engineering or physics sciences.

Sorry if this information is somewhat vague for you, if you have any more questions, just ask and I will try and narrow it down.
I haven't really looked into the balance of art and maths much in the universities I'm considering, purely because I do really enjoy both subjects but maybe in that case it would be best for me to find somewhere like you said, that teaches you the skills to be an architects as well as having a good balance of both sciences and arts.
Thanks for your help!
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sez0603
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Which universities are more math/technical based? I know Bath is very mathsy and Cambridge is too, but what others are there?
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Merackon
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(Original post by sez0603)
Which universities are more math/technical based? I know Bath is very mathsy and Cambridge is too, but what others are there?
To find that out the best way would be to look at the course content and expectations of the university. Also, when I was looking for a university, I saw that some universities specifically required maths A2, whilst others Maths or Art / Design. That might be an indicator?
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