username1592703
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Got the grades I needed to get on to the History course at Warwick, and i wondered if anyone with experience doing a History degree could recommend any sort of preparation. I meant to really knuckle down on it over the summer but never got round to it - now I don't know where to start!

Thanks
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ageshallnot
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(Original post by franzorb)
Got the grades I needed to get on to the History course at Warwick, and i wondered if anyone with experience doing a History degree could recommend any sort of preparation. I meant to really knuckle down on it over the summer but never got round to it - now I don't know where to start!

Thanks
The following book would be an excellent start:
http://www.amazon.co.uk/dp/B00CB5H6G...k+and+macraild
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E.Aglian
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Howdy Franz.

I'll repost the below. It was for a different thread but is applicable here.

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Do you know what history modules you'll take in your first year?

You'll almost certainly have some sort of History 101 module, so I'd recommend the following;

E. H. Carr, What is History?
John Tosh, The Pursuit of History
Richard J. Evans, In Defence of History
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colourtheory
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(Original post by E.Aglian)
Howdy Franz.

I'll repost the below. It was for a different thread but is applicable here.

---

Do you know what history modules you'll take in your first year?

You'll almost certainly have some sort of History 101 module, so I'd recommend the following;

E. H. Carr, What is History?
John Tosh, The Pursuit of History
Richard J. Evans, In Defence of History
May I suggest complementing those texts with a few primary texts? Maybe something by Machiavelli, Gibbon, Ranke, Tacitus, or Herodotus. They're excellent writers for providing an insight into the evolution of history as a discipline.
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puella_optima
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What about the History of Histories by J.W. Burrow? its taking me a lonngggg time to read/get into.
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gutenberg
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Do you know which modules you'll be taking? For any of them that are new to you, reading one or two general books that give you a sense of the chronology, major themes etc. would probably be useful. Before plunging into the likes of Tosh, Ranke, Evans etc. reading something like 'History: A Very Short Introduction', that introduces some of the major themes in historiography, might be useful. I would also take a look at one or two of those 'Studying History at University'-type books, that discuss essay-writing technique, note-taking etc. Having some good practical advice under your belt will also help a lot initially.
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returnmigrant
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Studying History : http://www.amazon.co.uk/Studying-His.../dp/1403987343
is the best book possible for anyone about to start a History course. It introduces you to the whole idea of how we study history and the various theories about this and how they have developed (known as historiography). This is crucial stuff to start to get to grips with as very little of this is covered at A level and is part of the 'step up' to Uni level study. Its also includes very well written bits about writing Uni essays, note taking, exams etc. HIGHLY recommended.

PS. The other books quoted here (In defence of History etc) are for when you have read and got to grips with the book above - and they are also all now a bit dated, especially Carr's What is History.

A few of the books recently published that will introduce you to current ideas etc are :
1) Other Pasts, Different Presents, Alternative Futures
http://www.amazon.co.uk/ebooks/dp/B0...933653&sr=1-12
2) History and Social Theory
http://www.polity.co.uk/book.asp?ref=0745634079

And, as someone else above suggested - to get to grips with specific eras/areas of History, have a look at the Very Short Introduction series. Small, cheap and easy to read : http://ukcatalogue.oup.com/category/...r2#productList
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holly_1994
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Hello! I'll leave the link below to a similar thread that was started a while back. Also, I'll post my response:

"Almost all History courses have an introductory module about the meaning of history. At my university (QMUL) we have 'History in Practice', and you can Amazon books with that title. I didn't read anything for that course other than the weekly material, so I wouldn't stress yourself about preparatory reading for any form of introductory module.If you did want to read for it, there is no specific book that you need, really, and any 'introduction to history' book would do. Don't worry about reading too much before you begin university, but it might relieve a bit of stress to read a few texts before you start.

I'll list below any books that I studied last year (my first year) and their topic area, based on what I can remember. I might miss a few out, but it should give you some idea.

Medieval/Renaissance:
Peter Abelard: 'Sic et Non' and 'Historia Calamitatum'
Otto of Freising: 'The Deeds of Frederick Barbarossa'
J. Richards: 'Sex, Dissidence and Damnation. Minority Groups in the Middle Ages'
G. Brucker: 'Establishment of a Magistracy to Extirpate Sodomy' in 'The Society of Renaissance Italy. A Documentary Study'
James G. Clark: 'The Religious Orders in Pre-Reformation England'

Early-Modern:
Merry E. Weisner-Hanks: 'Early-Modern Europe,1450-1789'
Beat Kumin: 'The European World, 1500-1800'
Both of the above are amazing. If you were only to buy just one of these, you would sail through an early-modern module.
Euan Cameron: 'The European Reformation'
L. Roper: 'Oedipus and the Devil: Witchcraft, Sexuality and Religion in Early-Modern Europe'
Henrich Kramer and Jacob Sprenger's 'Malleus Maleficarum' of 1487.

You might also want to look at John Merriman's lectures on YouTube, as they are pretty good for most things early-modern.

Modern (mainly British)
Eric J. Evans: 'The Shaping of Modern Britain'
Martin Pugh: 'State and Society'
Malcolm Chase: 'Chartism, A New History'
Charles Darwin: 'On the Origin of Species' (for biopolitics and social changes in 19th century)

Intellectual History
Machiavelli: 'The Prince' and 'Discourses'
Wollstonecraft: 'A Vindication of the Rights of Woman (not women as people seem to think)'
Rousseau: 'Emile'
Hobbes: 'De Cive'
More: 'Utopia'

Global History
Jessica Coope: 'Religious and Cultural Conversion to Islam in Ninth-Century Ummayad Cordoba'
Ross E. Dunn: 'The Adventures of Ibn Battuta'
Greg Dening: 'Mr Bligh's Bad Language: Passion, Power, and Theatre on the Bounty'
Daniel K. Richter: 'Facing East from Indian Country: A Native History of Early America' "


Hope this helps!
Other thread link: http://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/show...891&highlight=
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