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    Haloseres are salt marshes. They are formed from mud flats. The difference between a mud flat and a salt marsh is that mud flats are covered by water at high tide, but salt marshes are completely dry. Salt marshes (haloseres) form by a process called plant succession. It's where the first plant which is used to the salty water is able to colonise the mud flats, and put deposits such as mucus there to allow for the next set of colonists to come. Each stage in the succession is known as a sere. The final stage is called the climax vegetation (ooh pardon).

    The mud flat forms in the first place due to deposition of sediment, and with each stage in the succession, the new plants are able to trap more sediment and slow down the tide even more. Eventually it'll become a salt marsh, and ultimately turn into woodland. Btw the first plants are called the pioneer plants, and can tolerate the salty water.

    Need anymore detail?

    -=X=-
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    am doin edexcel coasts/rivers tomorro afternoon, not lookin forward 2 it as i don't have very gd case study notes, was ill durin term.
    Why is the Mississippi good as my notes say engineering didn't wrk?
    Cheers for any help

    Ally
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    (Original post by boxersarecool)
    am doin edexcel coasts/rivers tomorro afternoon, not lookin forward 2 it as i don't have very gd case study notes, was ill durin term.
    Why is the Mississippi good as my notes say engineering didn't wrk?
    Cheers for any help

    Ally
    It didn't work, which caused flooding. The Mississippi is great, you can use it for almost any river question!
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    (Original post by meawinner)
    Yup i'm doing the UK for my population of an MEDC. Thats my last case study to learn and i'm nearly there. All you need to know for this and the china one are its age-sex structure, population density and migration (internal and if u can then international aswell).

    Hope it helps and if u want a summary of any of the case studies we need to know then just message me and i'l try to help. Good luck
    thanks! so are you learning anything about the saltmarshes?
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    (Original post by Xulfer)
    Haloseres are salt marshes. They are formed from mud flats. The difference between a mud flat and a salt marsh is that mud flats are covered by water at high tide, but salt marshes are completely dry. Salt marshes (haloseres) form by a process called plant succession. It's where the first plant which is used to the salty water is able to colonise the mud flats, and put deposits such as mucus there to allow for the next set of colonists to come. Each stage in the succession is known as a sere. The final stage is called the climax vegetation (ooh pardon).

    The mud flat forms in the first place due to deposition of sediment, and with each stage in the succession, the new plants are able to trap more sediment and slow down the tide even more. Eventually it'll become a salt marsh, and ultimately turn into woodland. Btw the first plants are called the pioneer plants, and can tolerate the salty water.

    Need anymore detail?

    -=X=-
    Here's stuff about salt marshes ^
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    (Original post by Xulfer)
    Haloseres are salt marshes. They are formed from mud flats. The difference between a mud flat and a salt marsh is that mud flats are covered by water at high tide, but salt marshes are completely dry. Salt marshes (haloseres) form by a process called plant succession. It's where the first plant which is used to the salty water is able to colonise the mud flats, and put deposits such as mucus there to allow for the next set of colonists to come. Each stage in the succession is known as a sere. The final stage is called the climax vegetation (ooh pardon).

    The mud flat forms in the first place due to deposition of sediment, and with each stage in the succession, the new plants are able to trap more sediment and slow down the tide even more. Eventually it'll become a salt marsh, and ultimately turn into woodland. Btw the first plants are called the pioneer plants, and can tolerate the salty water.

    Need anymore detail?

    -=X=-
    Thanks I found stuff in my textbook now too which helps, but some of what you said isn't there so it's very useful
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    Hey, I didn't realise you could rate ur own posts! This post now has five stars
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    (Original post by ~Sam~)
    Hey, I didn't realise you could rate ur own posts! This post now has five stars
    Lol i don't actually understand the system of rating posts but i gave it another 5 stars
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    (Original post by Ramaya)
    Lol i don't actually understand the system of rating posts but i gave it another 5 stars
    I don't understand it either, but it's nice having stars
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    As always with geography, and I'm going to spam it several times so that you remember:

    GIVE EXAMPLES GIVE EXAMPLES GIVE EXAMPLES GIVE EXAMPLES GIVE EXAMPLES GIVE EXAMPLES GIVE EXAMPLES GIVE EXAMPLES GIVE EXAMPLES GIVE EXAMPLES GIVE EXAMPLES.

    Even if it doesn't ask for any examples specifically, give some. Keep focused on the question too

    For salt marshes it may be useful to GIVE EXAMPLES As in, pioneers plants are green algae and eel grass, followed by spartina and glasswort followed by etc. etc.

    -=X=-
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    (Original post by Xulfer)
    Haloseres are salt marshes. They are formed from mud flats. The difference between a mud flat and a salt marsh is that mud flats are covered by water at high tide, but salt marshes are completely dry. Salt marshes (haloseres) form by a process called plant succession. It's where the first plant which is used to the salty water is able to colonise the mud flats, and put deposits such as mucus there to allow for the next set of colonists to come. Each stage in the succession is known as a sere. The final stage is called the climax vegetation (ooh pardon).

    The mud flat forms in the first place due to deposition of sediment, and with each stage in the succession, the new plants are able to trap more sediment and slow down the tide even more. Eventually it'll become a salt marsh, and ultimately turn into woodland. Btw the first plants are called the pioneer plants, and can tolerate the salty water.

    Need anymore detail?

    -=X=-
    Hey, you don't happen to know a case study do you?
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    I don't know a case study for salt marshes, no sorry. I don't think you really need one, just need to give examples of the different plants. I know a couple of places where there are some, but they're local to me, and wouldn't be much use in an exam.

    -=X=-
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    (Original post by Xulfer)
    I don't know a case study for salt marshes, no sorry. I don't think you really need one, just need to give examples of the different plants. I know a couple of places where there are some, but they're local to me, and wouldn't be much use in an exam.

    -=X=-
    Ok. It says in the mark scheme you need a case study but hopefully it wont ask for one
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    Use words like colonise, stabilise, pioneer and low enery environment (which is how the sediment is deposited in the first place)

    -=X=-
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    (Original post by TheWolf)
    thanks! so are you learning anything about the saltmarshes?
    I've not learnt abt salt marshes as it is no longer on the syllabus, but we need to know a xesosere which is also called a psammosere and in that book it is braunton burrows. Learn that case study and the profile of the plants across the succession.
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    (Original post by meawinner)
    I've not learnt abt salt marshes as it is no longer on the syllabus, but we need to know a xesosere which is also called a psammosere and in that book it is braunton burrows. Learn that case study and the profile of the plants across the succession.
    wicked - we dont need to know anything about soils either right?

    anyways to other people: how do constructive boundaries cause volcanoes? in the book it says: mid-ocean ridges are associated with volcanic activity - the ridge is marked by a series of volcanic islands...etc i hought volcanoes forrm from one plate going under another one?
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    I dont think so in much detail like the book but the syllabus says this
    "The development of plant communities and their related soils (including soil profiles) over time;"
    so u need to know that.

    Erm constructive is where the plates move apart causing a gap to form where the magma can rise and then the volcano forms.

    Does n e 1 know how an island arc forms i'm a little confused is that where there are several erruptions in the middle of the sea then land forms from the hardened lava?
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    (Original post by meawinner)
    I dont think so in much detail like the book but the syllabus says this
    "The development of plant communities and their related soils (including soil profiles) over time;"
    so u need to know that.

    Erm constructive is where the plates move apart causing a gap to form where the magma can rise and then the volcano forms.

    Does n e 1 know how an island arc forms i'm a little confused is that where there are several erruptions in the middle of the sea then land forms from the hardened lava?
    island arcs are just a chain of volcanic islands on the continental side of an ocean trench

    oh and our exam is on the afternoon yea?
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    (Original post by TheWolf)
    oh and our exam is on the afternoon yea?
    Yeah my m8 was just asking me that on the phone lol. yeah its in the afternoon. But the bad thing abt that is that I have bio the next mornign(i.e. not much time to revise for it lol)

    btw how r u revising for the investigation paper r u just learning ur coursework?
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    (Original post by meawinner)
    Yeah my m8 was just asking me that on the phone lol. yeah its in the afternoon. But the bad thing abt that is that I have bio the next mornign(i.e. not much time to revise for it lol)

    btw how r u revising for the investigation paper r u just learning ur coursework?
    no im not learning my coursework at all - imm just learning the back of the book...which case studies have you learned for the limestone and granite?
 
 
 

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