Turn on thread page Beta
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    Can you still claim free prescriptions as a university student? At the moment I tick that little "Aged 16, 17, 18 and in full-time education" box Will I have to start paying when I start uni in September or are prescriptions still free? Just curious! Thanks.
    Offline

    9
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by slowjamz)
    Can you still claim free prescriptions as a university student? At the moment I tick that little "Aged 16, 17, 18 and in full-time education" box Will I have to start paying when I start uni in September or are prescriptions still free? Just curious! Thanks.
    As far as I know you have to pay - I've always had to pay whenever I've had something prescribed.
    Offline

    3
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by slowjamz)
    Can you still claim free prescriptions as a university student? At the moment I tick that little "Aged 16, 17, 18 and in full-time education" box Will I have to start paying when I start uni in September or are prescriptions still free? Just curious! Thanks.
    I think you can still get them for free, or at least at a discount. You have to send off for some kind of eligibility certificate though which just confirms that you are a student of a higher education institution.

    edit: I just checked and whilst you're under 19, you can get free prescriptions. Once you are above the age of 19 the prescription charges come into effect. Exemption from prescription charges for those above the age of 19 is available on the grounds of low income which you have to send a form for - this form goes by the name of G2. If the claim is accepted you get one of two certificates - either an AG2 (full help) or an AG3 (partial help).
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by who_me)
    I think you can still get them for free, or at least at a discount. You have to send off for some kind of eligibility certificate though which just confirms that you are a student of a higher education institution.

    edit: I just checked and whilst you're under 19, you can get free prescriptions. Once you are above the age of 19 the prescription charges come into effect. Exemption from prescription charges for those above the age of 19 is available on the grounds of low income which you have to send a form for - this form goes by the name of G2. If the claim is accepted you get one of two certificates - either an AG2 (full help) or an AG3 (partial help).
    Thanks who_me That's really helpful information and I really appreciate it - definitely owe you a rep for that one (as soon as I can rep again!)

    Does anyone know what the income thresholds are to qualify for help? Or if it's based on my income as a student or my parents'?
    Offline

    6
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by slowjamz)
    Thanks who_me That's really helpful information and I really appreciate it - definitely owe you a rep for that one (as soon as I can rep again!)

    Does anyone know what the income thresholds are to qualify for help? Or if it's based on my income as a student or my parents'?
    Off the top of my head, if you are earning less than £4000 a year, and have savings of less than £8000, you are entitled to full help. Is isn't dependtant on your parents at all (unless they are giving you more than £4000 a year....)
    Offline

    7
    ReputationRep:
    Do you mean that they don't take your parents' earnings into consideration at all? that would be great and i might finally be able to get my teeth sorted out and hopefully i own't have to pay for it. yay!
    Offline

    16
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by swallows)
    Do you mean that they don't take your parents' earnings into consideration at all? that would be great and i might finally be able to get my teeth sorted out and hopefully i own't have to pay for it. yay!
    this is for prescription charges though..that are normally £6 something i think, eeverytime you pick one up (although ~75% of prescriptions aren't paid for)

    dental treatment is in theory on the NHS..but finding an NHS dentist is hard.. orthodontic treatment is also on the NHS but only if it's of a certain severity..

    sorry to be the bearer of bad news!
    Offline

    3
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by slowjamz)
    Thanks who_me That's really helpful information and I really appreciate it - definitely owe you a rep for that one (as soon as I can rep again!)
    No probs happy to help
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    Well, I had to go to hospital regarding my new medication, and I had to sign this form because I don't pay.

    You shouldn't be paying for perscritions if you're under 25, that's according to the form at the back
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Tigger1986)
    Well, I had to go to hospital regarding my new medication, and I had to sign this form because I don't pay.

    You shouldn't be paying for perscritions if you're under 25, that's according to the form at the back
    You get prescriptions free if you're under 25 in Wales. In England it's different (I don't know about Scotland, N. Ireland and Ireland).

    If you're under 19 and earning less than a certain amount (most 19-year-old students fall into this category) then you don't have to pay. You also don't have to pay for oral contraceptives or the morning after pill (I think it's free to everyone in the UK regardless of age or income).
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    It's called a HC2 certificate (with the £8000 savings and £4000 earnings boundaries). Ask for it at the doctor's. I believe the dental version is a HC1 certificate. If you have one you should take it with you when you colletc a prescription.
    Offline

    12
    ReputationRep:
    Still being under 19 (until June 30th) I get my prescriptions free, so I have been to the doctors to get a repeat prescription for my inhalers, so I can stock up while I still get them for free!
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by blissy)
    It's called a HC2 certificate (with the £8000 savings and £4000 earnings boundaries). Ask for it at the doctor's. I believe the dental version is a HC1 certificate. If you have one you should take it with you when you colletc a prescription.
    Yes, that's right - HC2 (just to endorse your statement).
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    the forms only take into account your own income, so as a student you are assesed on your loan / grant any earnings.

    The certificate lasts a year so remember to fill in the form every year.

    Once you get the certificate (assuming full help) you get free prescriptions, free eye test and a voucher towards glasses/lenses, free dental treatment (other than cosmetic) and you are entitled to claim travel fares to hospital.

    If you have to pay for a prescription / glasses / dental treatment before you get your certificate you should ask for a recipt and then claim it back. Some opticians / dentists will refund you themselves if you bring in the completed form.

    Also worth shopping around for opticians. The one I use (small family firm) have a principle that if you have a low income voucher you shouldn't have to pay for spectacle lenses. So although the certificate only covers a set amount they don't charge you the rest. They also do frames for £10.00 and give students a 10% discount.
    Offline

    7
    ReputationRep:
    Hmm, that is good news, but what exactly is meant by cosmetic dental treatment? (sorry, this is becoming an increasingly technical discussion). Say you needed a brace cos you have wonky teeth, is that considered cosmetic? im sure most dental treatment could, if you stretched it, be considered cosmetic rather than necessary. hopefully i'll be able to blag the brace thing and say it hurts me to have wonky teeth. maybe i should start crying and say i'm psychologically scarred because of it. :rolleyes: surely an overbite doesn't come under cosmetic. hmmmm.
    Offline

    14
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by .NK)
    ...the morning after pill (I think it's free to everyone in the UK regardless of age or income).
    From family planning clinics, yes. If you can't get to one and have to go to a pharmacy, they're most definitely not free - or cheap. Over £20 each!
    Offline

    16
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by swallows)
    Hmm, that is good news, but what exactly is meant by cosmetic dental treatment? (sorry, this is becoming an increasingly technical discussion). Say you needed a brace cos you have wonky teeth, is that considered cosmetic? im sure most dental treatment could, if you stretched it, be considered cosmetic rather than necessary. hopefully i'll be able to blag the brace thing and say it hurts me to have wonky teeth. maybe i should start crying and say i'm psychologically scarred because of it. :rolleyes: surely an overbite doesn't come under cosmetic. hmmmm.
    TBH, if it was considered severe enough your dentist would have referred you to an orthodontist at ~ 11-13 i think, as that's when most treatment is most effective..
    Offline

    7
    ReputationRep:
    TBH, if it was considered severe enough your dentist would have referred you to an orthodontist at ~ 11-13 i think, as that's when most treatment is most effective..
    Yeah, i had a brace when i was about 10/11 and then left the UK and never had a new one put on and as dental treatment isn't free for me here i haven't been regularly for over six years, i think i've been four times in that space of time and they did suggest i should get one but the price was horrendous. i decided to leave till i returned to the UK thinking (wrongly) that dental care was free for students (parents thinking nothing's changed in 30 years) so now it's very annoying to find it's not and i will quite possibly have to pay.

    anyway, lol, sorry about that long-winded, boring expose on the intricacies of my teeth.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by swallows)
    Hmm, that is good news, but what exactly is meant by cosmetic dental treatment? (sorry, this is becoming an increasingly technical discussion). Say you needed a brace cos you have wonky teeth, is that considered cosmetic? im sure most dental treatment could, if you stretched it, be considered cosmetic rather than necessary. hopefully i'll be able to blag the brace thing and say it hurts me to have wonky teeth. maybe i should start crying and say i'm psychologically scarred because of it. :rolleyes: surely an overbite doesn't come under cosmetic. hmmmm.
    Cosmetic is stuff just to make your teeth look better. I had my teeth whitened, it was just because I didn't like the colour not for any real reason so I had to pay.
    Offline

    12
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by slowjamz)
    Can you still claim free prescriptions as a university student? At the moment I tick that little "Aged 16, 17, 18 and in full-time education" box Will I have to start paying when I start uni in September or are prescriptions still free? Just curious! Thanks.
    i think there's some kind of insurance students can get that pays some of prescriptions fees, but i do know contraception (such as the pill) is free until you're 27 (weird age!) regardless of whether you're in education or not.
 
 
 
Poll
Which accompaniment is best?
Useful resources
Uni match

Applying to uni?

Our tool will help you find the perfect course

Articles:

Debate and current affairs guidelinesDebate and current affairs wiki

Quick link:

Educational debate unanswered threads

Groups associated with this forum:

View associated groups

The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

Write a reply...
Reply
Hide
Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.