wannabe BDS-er
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Not sure if this is the right thread for the right forum but what the heck.

So I'm 23 now and have STRUGGLED in attaining my biomed degree, I enrolled into this degree with an access to science course. Completed first yr - failed. Retook the first year - passed. Progressed to second yr - failed (by only two modules might i add, both very close to the pass mark at 40). And now the university have excluded me from the course.

I'm now trying to gain entry into second yr for biomed at a different uni, but all rejections so far.

I'm also seriously contemplating leaving biomed all together. It's done nothing for me except limit my academic skills and intelligence. Perhaps a course more social science or humanities based would be better suited.

I hope it's not something I'll regret. My only concern is my parent's reaction. They think I will graduate next yr, only to find out it'll be another 3 yrs because I want to drop out of biomed.

Grr.
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thenextone
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Don't worry about your parents, it's you who has to make a living for yourself, not them.

BDS, did you want to be a dentist afterwards? If so, have you really got the motivation for a social science degree? I'm only asking as essay, thinking type subjects are much different to proven theory, textbook style subjects, so be prepared.

I'd definitely try and get a degree as even if you can find a job, you'll hit a glass ceiling in most cases as those with degrees will naturally achieve higher progression. With 50% of our generation having a degree, you'll essentially be fighting against them all in most occupations, theoretically speaking.

People say essay based subjects are easier, and this may be the case. But often, people who think logically and always work towards a final answer aren't, arguably, abstract enough to root out the different trails of thoughts required for essay subjects. So you may find one idea but you'll need to find a few other solid ones and then evaluate etc and have very good reasons for eliminating ideas which you decided were not as strong.

What area of humanities/social sciences are you most interested?
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wannabe BDS-er
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Hi, thank you so much for your response.

I'm interested in international relations. I just think the dynamics of the current affairs of the world interest me a lot more than what diagnostic health care has to offer.

I'm in an awkward position, I have no complaints against the subject itself, but uni regulations and logistics have really left me no other choice.

Yes, dentistry was my long-term goal, but I'm not sure if I have the stamina for it anymore. It's just as demanding and who really is passionate about teeth. It would just be for the status and salary.
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username1494226
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(Original post by thenextone)
Don't worry about your parents, it's you who has to make a living for yourself, not them.

BDS, did you want to be a dentist afterwards? If so, have you really got the motivation for a social science degree? I'm only asking as essay, thinking type subjects are much different to proven theory, textbook style subjects, so be prepared.

I'd definitely try and get a degree as even if you can find a job, you'll hit a glass ceiling in most cases as those with degrees will naturally achieve higher progression. With 50% of our generation having a degree, you'll essentially be fighting against them all in most occupations, theoretically speaking.

People say essay based subjects are easier, and this may be the case. But often, people who think logically and always work towards a final answer aren't, arguably, abstract enough to root out the different trails of thoughts required for essay subjects. So you may find one idea but you'll need to find a few other solid ones and then evaluate etc and have very good reasons for eliminating ideas which you decided were not as strong.

What area of humanities/social sciences are you most interested?
That's not necessarily true in a good few cases. In some fields it is a glass ceiling but there are many others which do it the right way and that is promotion by merit(the way it should be). The navy, the civil service, the army, airliners, cooking etc. amongst many others are a meritocracy. A degree shouldn't be the difference between progression and stalling. Just because someone studied a degree doesn't necessarily qualify them as being "better" compared to someone who has worked their way up a company and understands its internal workings. Degrees should only be a road block in the medical, vet and law fields. I would have said engineering but I'd only say that applies in the upper echelons of the field that are more concerned with theory than practice. The whole market needs to return to being a meritocracy because that's what allows for social mobility(contrary to popular belief that a degree is your only ticket into the revered middle class of this nation) amongst the populace.
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thenextone
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(Original post by marco14196)
That's not necessarily true in a good few cases. In some fields it is a glass ceiling but there are many others which do it the right way and that is promotion by merit(the way it should be). The navy, the civil service, the army, airliners, cooking etc. amongst many others are a meritocracy. A degree shouldn't be the difference between progression and stalling. Just because someone studied a degree doesn't necessarily qualify them as being "better" compared to someone who has worked their way up a company and understands its internal workings. Degrees should only be a road block in the medical, vet and law fields. I would have said engineering but I'd only say that applies in the upper echelons of the field that are more concerned with theory than practice. The whole market needs to return to being a meritocracy because that's what allows for social mobility(contrary to popular belief that a degree is your only ticket into the revered middle class of this nation) amongst the populace.
No, it is true. Those who manage to reach upper echelons of their sector without a degree are the exception and with 50% now going to uni, it's only going to get harder in the years to come.

Employers are massive snobs - all you need to do is read about the privileges the middle privately educated class have over their lower-middle/working class state educated counterparts after leaving university.

I completely agree with your point that it doesn't better qualify a person but that's the way employers are doing it these days. With more people fighting for fewer jobs, it also becomes a very easy filter requirement which can cut the number of applicants for a position.

Having a degree generally leads to faster progression and thus, promotion.

An example could be the coffee industry. You could have someone who joins a coffee store, like costa, at 16. By 21 they might be assistant manager of the store.

A graduate at 16 went on to A-levels, at 18 onto uni and at 21 joined costa's general management scheme in their head office. The person who is assistant manager can only dream of being given such an opportunity which may arise after several years as a manager, then area manager or the like...

You make it easier for yourself getting a degree, unless not going to uni gives you a really defined path like the school leaver accounting schemes which leave you on a par with a gradate 5 years after joining. Very few sector offer such a promise.
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thenextone
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(Original post by wannabe BDS-er)
Hi, thank you so much for your response.

I'm interested in international relations. I just think the dynamics of the current affairs of the world interest me a lot more than what diagnostic health care has to offer.

I'm in an awkward position, I have no complaints against the subject itself, but uni regulations and logistics have really left me no other choice.

Yes, dentistry was my long-term goal, but I'm not sure if I have the stamina for it anymore. It's just as demanding and who really is passionate about teeth. It would just be for the status and salary.
Wouldn't advise that for dentistry, it has one of the highest suicide rates and if money is your passion, there are lower stress ways of getting it lol
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username1494226
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(Original post by thenextone)
No, it is true. Those who manage to reach upper echelons of their sector without a degree are the exception and with 50% now going to uni, it's only going to get harder in the years to come.

Employers are massive snobs - all you need to do is read about the privileges the middle privately educated class have over their lower-middle/working class state educated counterparts after leaving university.

I completely agree with your point that it doesn't better qualify a person but that's the way employers are doing it these days. With more people fighting for fewer jobs, it also becomes a very easy filter requirement which can cut the number of applicants for a position.

Having a degree generally leads to faster progression and thus, promotion.

An example could be the coffee industry. You could have someone who joins a coffee store, like costa, at 16. By 21 they might be assistant manager of the store.

A graduate at 16 went on to A-levels, at 18 onto uni and at 21 joined costa's general management scheme in their head office. The person who is assistant manager can only dream of being given such an opportunity which may arise after several years as a manager, then area manager or the like...

You make it easier for yourself getting a degree, unless not going to uni gives you a really defined path like the school leaver accounting schemes which leave you on a par with a gradate 5 years after joining. Very few sector offer such a promise.
One can dream that the universities funding will dry up and they all choke on their pretentious nonsense. It's disgusting that the government has let these gluttonous institutions continue on and ravaging society as a result. Universities are becoming a cancer in the employment market and they need to chopped right out of it. They're middlemen and nothing more. My plan for myself is to go into the navy for a few years, work my way up by merit, make a nice sum of money and then set up my own business. My ideology is to take the harder path to enjoy the fruits of labour at the end.
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