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    Hi, I'm going off to Warwick in October to study English Literature. Friends from other unis have been buying books in advance according to a reading list & I wondered if this was the same at Warwick. Are there some core texts I should buy before going?? Can't seem to find the answer on the university website...
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    (Original post by colil)
    Hi, I'm going off to Warwick in October to study English Literature. Friends from other unis have been buying books in advance according to a reading list & I wondered if this was the same at Warwick. Are there some core texts I should buy before going?? Can't seem to find the answer on the university website...
    Going to be joining you! Watching this thread as I need to know too...
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    (Original post by colil)
    Hi, I'm going off to Warwick in October to study English Literature. Friends from other unis have been buying books in advance according to a reading list & I wondered if this was the same at Warwick. Are there some core texts I should buy before going?? Can't seem to find the answer on the university website...
    Heyy I'm going to be joining Warwick for English lit too, I had no idea we'd need to buy texts I'm advance 😭😭
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    I'm doing English Lit with Creative Writing and there is a reading list for that course and it is almost exactly the same for pure lit, it's under the course outline
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    Hello! Clueless English Fresher (Number 5?) here. You can find all the texts you'll need inside each of the outlines of the four first year modules, on the department's website. I know this because I spent a great deal of time worrying and running in circles about it myself In case you're like, super lazy:

    The Epic Tradition (correct editions/translations are v. important)

    Texts to buy Term 1: Homer, the Iliad, trans. Richmond Lattimore (protip: READ THIS BEFORE TERM STARTS. Homer's cool I promise but he does go on)
    the Odyssey, trans. Richmond Lattimore
    Term 2:Virgil, the Aeneid, trans. R. Fitzgerald (Everyman)
    Milton, Paradise Lost (in The Norton Anthology 8th ed Vol B - 16th/Early 17th Century)
    Term 3: Derek Walcott, Omeros

    Modes of Reading

    Sam Selvon, The Lonely Londoners (1956)
    Rachel Kushner, The Flamethrowers (2013)
    Allen Ginsberg, Howl (1956)
    J.M Coetzee, Foe (1986)
    David Lodge and Nigel Wood, Modern Criticism and Theory: A Reader (3rd edition)
    J.A. Cuddon (ed.) Dictionary of Literary Terms and Literary Theory revised by C.E.Preston

    Medieval to Renaissance English Literature (Again, get the right editions!)

    Sir Gawain and the Green Knight (ed.) J. Burrow (Penguin).
    Chaucer, The Riverside Chaucer (ed.) L. Benson (Oxford).
    The Norton Anthology of English Literature. The Sixteenth Century, the Early Seventeenth Century. Volume B. (ed.) S Greenblatt et al. Revised 9th edition, 2012.

    Non-essential, background texts for this module:

    Maurice Keen, English Society in the Later Middle Ages 1348-1500 (Penguin, 1990)
    J.A. Burrow, Medieval Writers and their Work, 2nd edn. (Oxford, 2008)
    John Guy, Tudor England (1990)


    Think that's everything! And you're not gonna need it all right away so just make sure you check what's required for the first term and go from there. As far as my detecting skills go the set texts for the final module, Modern World Literatures, haven't been updated for this year yet, so feel free to have fun/heartattacks imagining what's involved in that one. Hope this helps, I wish us all luck
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    (Original post by Weaver~)
    Think that's everything! And you're not gonna need it all right away so just make sure you check what's required for the first term and go from there. As far as my detecting skills go the set texts for the final module, Modern World Literatures, haven't been updated for this year yet, so feel free to have fun/heartattacks imagining what's involved in that one. Hope this helps, I wish us all luck
    Although the Modern World Literature hasn't been finalised (I think it changes every year?) they did give a list of probable books which I'll add on I've started 'Lolita' just because diving into 'The Iliad' really doesn't appeal to me. Warwick is notoriously bad about sending out information though, so it's possible we won't get our reading lists until after our accommodation!

    Modern World Literatures (Monday, 5pm)
    Goethe, Faust Part I
    Shelley, Frankenstein
    Baudelaire, “The Painter of Modern Life”
    Soseki, Kokoro
    Conrad, Heart of Darkness
    Lu Xun, “A Madman’s Diary”
    Kafka, The Metamorphosis
    Brecht, Mother Courage and Her Children
    Nabokov, Lolita
    Césaire, Notebook of a Return to the Native Land
    Salih, A Season of Migration to the North
    Lispector,Hour of the Star
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    People - don't buy books! Waste of money, just use the library.

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    (Original post by justag)
    People - don't buy books! Waste of money, just use the library.

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    I definitely think that's the case for the books later on in the term, but the website is pretty explicit that we really should read 'The Iliad' for our Epic Tradition module, and 'The Lonely Londoners' for the Modes of Reading module. I just went and bought the first couple of books from all the modules and figured I'd borrow the rest from the library (You can get some pretty good deals on Amazon in the 'new and used' section!)
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    (Original post by elishabee)
    I definitely think that's the case for the books later on in the term, but the website is pretty explicit that we really should read 'The Iliad' for our Epic Tradition module, and 'The Lonely Londoners' for the Modes of Reading module. I just went and bought the first couple of books from all the modules and figured I'd borrow the rest from the library (You can get some pretty good deals on Amazon in the 'new and used' section!)
    I studied English at Warwick. But whatever, you'll regret buying.

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    (Original post by elishabee)
    Although the Modern World Literature hasn't been finalised (I think it changes every year?) they did give a list of probable books which I'll add on I've started 'Lolita' just because diving into 'The Iliad' really doesn't appeal to me. Warwick is notoriously bad about sending out information though, so it's possible we won't get our reading lists until after our accommodation!

    Modern World Literatures (Monday, 5pm)
    Goethe, Faust Part I
    Shelley, Frankenstein
    Baudelaire, “The Painter of Modern Life”
    Soseki, Kokoro
    Conrad, Heart of Darkness
    Lu Xun, “A Madman’s Diary”
    Kafka, The Metamorphosis
    Brecht, Mother Courage and Her Children
    Nabokov, Lolita
    Césaire, Notebook of a Return to the Native Land
    Salih, A Season of Migration to the North
    Lispector,Hour of the Star
    Thank you! That was incredibly helpful
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    (Original post by justag)
    I studied English at Warwick. But whatever, you'll regret buying.

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    Doesn't the library run out of copies? I was just trying to cover myself because I assumed 6 copies would soon run out between like...200 students (I'm not sure how many English Lit students there are). Please correct me if I'm wrong! I just didn't want to mess up in my first week lol
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    (Original post by elishabee)
    Doesn't the library run out of copies? I was just trying to cover myself because I assumed 6 copies would soon run out between like...200 students (I'm not sure how many English Lit students there are). Please correct me if I'm wrong! I just didn't want to mess up in my first week lol
    I understand you're trying to prepare and I did the same - but ultimately it's not a big deal if you don't religiously keep up with the reading, nobody does as there's simply not enough time. The lecturers know this.

    What I did is borrow books from the library and even if I can only take it out on short loan rather than standard loan I'd speed read so I get a general idea of the book. That way I'm able to get enough out of lectures and seminars.

    I only bought books for essays and exams

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    (Original post by justag)
    I understand you're trying to prepare and I did the same - but ultimately it's not a big deal if you don't religiously keep up with the reading, nobody does as there's simply not enough time. The lecturers know this.

    What I did is borrow books from the library and even if I can only take it out on short loan rather than standard loan I'd speed read so I get a general idea of the book. That way I'm able to get enough out of lectures and seminars.

    I only bought books for essays and exams

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    Ah! That makes sense. I did hear something similar from my friend who studies at Keele, which I didn't understand until she explained that you're told which texts you'll have in the exam so you can actually prepare properly. Could you tell me how the exams work at Warwick since the website isn't that helpful? Thank you!
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    (Original post by elishabee)
    Ah! That makes sense. I did hear something similar from my friend who studies at Keele, which I didn't understand until she explained that you're told which texts you'll have in the exam so you can actually prepare properly. Could you tell me how the exams work at Warwick since the website isn't that helpful? Thank you!
    When I was in first year, there was a 3 hour exam for Med ren and modern world lit at the end of the year and coursework assessment throughout the year for Modes of reading and the other one (I forget lol)

    You can pick which texts you want to write about for the coursework and for the exams it's best to prepare a few texts - kind of like A level.

    You only really go into depth with the books you're assessed on. Lectures and seminars only give you a general overview, there's not much emphasis on detail.

    Once you know which texts to prepare for the exam and what you'll write about in your coursework then you should buy the books really I think, rather than buying everything at the start of the year. Play it by ear through the year. That's my view

    I hope that was clear, I'm a bit tired lol

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    (Original post by justag)
    When I was in first year, there was a 3 hour exam for Med ren and modern world lit at the end of the year and coursework assessment throughout the year for Modes of reading and the other one (I forget lol)

    You can pick which texts you want to write about for the coursework and for the exams it's best to prepare a few texts - kind of like A level.

    You only really go into depth with the books you're assessed on. Lectures and seminars only give you a general overview, there's not much emphasis on detail.

    Once you know which texts to prepare for the exam and what you'll write about in your coursework then you should buy the books really I think, rather than buying everything at the start of the year. Play it by ear through the year. That's my view

    I hope that was clear, I'm a bit tired lol

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    That really helps Thank you so much! I love that two of the modules are coursework assessed because I hate exams haha
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    Correction: modes of reading and mwl - essay assessed

    Med ren + epic - exam assessed

    It's been a while

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    (Original post by justag)
    When I was in first year, there was a 3 hour exam for Med ren and modern world lit at the end of the year and coursework assessment throughout the year for Modes of reading and the other one (I forget lol)

    You can pick which texts you want to write about for the coursework and for the exams it's best to prepare a few texts - kind of like A level.

    You only really go into depth with the books you're assessed on. Lectures and seminars only give you a general overview, there's not much emphasis on detail.

    Once you know which texts to prepare for the exam and what you'll write about in your coursework then you should buy the books really I think, rather than buying everything at the start of the year. Play it by ear through the year. That's my view

    I hope that was clear, I'm a bit tired lol

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    Are the books on the 'set texts' list not the texts you'll be using for coursework/exams then? I'm confused.
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    (Original post by KimonoMyHouse)
    Are the books on the 'set texts' list not the texts you'll be using for coursework/exams then? I'm confused.
    The books on the set text list are for coursework/exams. But you won't use all of them, that's too much. You'll use some texts of your choosing to analyse in depth - probably your favourites.

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    (Original post by justag)
    You won't use all of them. That's way too much work to do. Do you expect to have to know all the texts in detail + criticism + quotes + possible comparisons? For four modules? No.

    You'll use some texts of your choosing to analyse in depth - probably your favourites.

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    Ahh, I see! Thanks.
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    Thank you, this is really helpful..! I will probs buy a couple but then play it by ear when I get there.
 
 
 
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