Turn on thread page Beta
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    Hey everyone,

    I'm considering the universities to study a film course at, I just wondered if anyone could help clear some things up + offer some advice for the following.

    I'm currently looking into: York, Royal Holloway and Bournemouth, mainly for a Film Production course. I currently take IB and all above choices are in reach of my predicted grade.

    1) What are these universities like? If you've studied there or if you have knowledge about them feel free to share any opinions!

    2) Are there any other universities to take a course in film production and why?

    3) As I'm looking more into practical production in the future, is it worth considering a film studies course at all, or just to stick with film production.

    Thanks!
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    Hi! I was studying Television and Film production at Hull School of Art and design and decided to switch to film studies, as far as i'm aware, film production jusf gives you more chance to get hands on experience in the industry however, film studies does involve practical too!

    Based on the choices there, Bournemouth is probably one of the best in the country for a media production course! But the choice is yours! Hope this helped and good luck!
    Offline

    11
    ReputationRep:
    I don't know if you're looking at Bournemouth University or Arts University Bournemouth.

    Anyway, I have transferred to a different university after one year at Bournemouth University doing TV Production. It is far from being the best in the country, absolutely terrible experience. I would avoid like the plague.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    Wow, always heard great things about it, but i guess those were mearly opions from people who'd never expereinced it for themselves!
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    Thanks everyone for the replies! Just for reference, I was mentioning the Bournemouth course, not Bournemouth arts!

    Just out of curiosity, what makes you say it's not a good course/uni?
    Offline

    11
    ReputationRep:
    Well Bournemouth University, both the course and university is bad for a lot of reasons.

    The course:
    Final Cut Pro is not taught on the course, neither is studio lighting or script writing. In regards to FCP, to this day the website advertises the course as teaching this software. The structure is incredibly poor. One moment you're filming a documentary, the next you're filming a drama, then a fashion show before shortly afterwards you're doing a music show. Sounds good? It does until you realise these productions are crammed together with barely any time to develop your knowledge of the genre. I've had staff tell me that we're expected to know everything from the day we start the course, so what am I paying £27,000 for? I am paying to just slog my guts out being a film production line, and not a good one at that.

    Of course there are upsides to the course, like there are good guest speakers so there are some networking opportunities available.

    The university itself:
    A complete shambles in my opinion. I am a DSA student with multiple health issues and have had no support. Note-takers forgotten to be implemented, extra-time not given in 3 out of 4 exams, and after a recent operation I was forced into university whilst in a wheelchair and high on morphine 5 days after the procedure.

    The university seems to also have a culture of supporting unpaid work. I was in a career's lecture where the advisor was telling us to expect unpaid work, what she didn't say is that unpaid work is illegal! The university advertises opportunities that should be paid NMW by law as well, for example SportBU wanted a student photographer with their own kit to take pictures of sporting activities for publication.


    What I do really hate is when people comment on BU with absolutely no knowledge of the place, basically hearing things on the grapevine.
    •  Official Rep
    Offline

    12
    ReputationRep:
     Official Rep
    (Original post by spomelete)
    Hey everyone,

    I'm considering the universities to study a film course at, I just wondered if anyone could help clear some things up + offer some advice for the following.

    I'm currently looking into: York, Royal Holloway and Bournemouth, mainly for a Film Production course. I currently take IB and all above choices are in reach of my predicted grade.

    1) What are these universities like? If you've studied there or if you have knowledge about them feel free to share any opinions!

    2) Are there any other universities to take a course in film production and why?

    3) As I'm looking more into practical production in the future, is it worth considering a film studies course at all, or just to stick with film production.

    Thanks!
    Hi spomelete,

    I have no knowledge of these universities and what they're like, but I do know another good university you could add to that list; us

    We are a Digital media institution based in South East London and we do provide a Digital Film course - which also happens to be one of our most popular courses!

    On the course you learn about production management, marketing, cinematography, VFX and more.

    We have a range of high end equipment which our students can use for periods of time through booking at our Central Loan Resource; the CLR is regularly updated with new equipment to keep up with the industry!

    There is also a dedicated editing area with rooms for colour grading and sound where our film and editing students regularly work - outside and inside class (it's a very social area )

    Feel free to have a look at the 'day in the life' interviews of Digital Film students and found out what they get up to: http://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/show....php?t=3455015

    If you need anything else, do let me know!

    Bee
    • Official TSR Representative
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    Official TSR Representative
    Hi @spomelete,

    I cannot comment on the universities you have listed but SAE Institute run a 2 year, hands on degree course is Digital Film Making. It's around 70-80% practical, so getting your hands on the kit and actually making films, adverts, music videos etc... We have 4 campuses for you to choose from too, one in London (Dalston), one is Oxford, one in Liverpool and one in Glasgow all of which are fully kitted out with industry standard facilities. The course is tagged as script to screen as it covers all aspects of film making, from the initial pitch right the way through pre and post production to marketing.

    A film studies course is usually more about the theory behind film making, analysis and so on, if you want a practical course then go for Film Making/Production.

    Let me know if you'd like a chat about it.

    Best wishes

    Pippa



    (Original post by spomelete)
    Hey everyone,

    I'm considering the universities to study a film course at, I just wondered if anyone could help clear some things up + offer some advice for the following.

    I'm currently looking into: York, Royal Holloway and Bournemouth, mainly for a Film Production course. I currently take IB and all above choices are in reach of my predicted grade.

    1) What are these universities like? If you've studied there or if you have knowledge about them feel free to share any opinions!

    2) Are there any other universities to take a course in film production and why?

    3) As I'm looking more into practical production in the future, is it worth considering a film studies course at all, or just to stick with film production.

    Thanks!
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by spomelete)
    Hey everyone,

    I'm considering the universities to study a film course at, I just wondered if anyone could help clear some things up + offer some advice for the following.

    I'm currently looking into: York, Royal Holloway and Bournemouth, mainly for a Film Production course. I currently take IB and all above choices are in reach of my predicted grade.

    1) What are these universities like? If you've studied there or if you have knowledge about them feel free to share any opinions!

    2) Are there any other universities to take a course in film production and why?

    3) As I'm looking more into practical production in the future, is it worth considering a film studies course at all, or just to stick with film production.

    Thanks!
    Hi Spomelete,

    I also study at Bournemouth University doing Television Production and personally love the course, I enjoy working on lots of different projects and feel I have drastically improved my technical and theoretical skills over the year. I think it's a good degree from a social perspective as well because you get very close to your course mates as you have to work with them on practical projects, so its great for making new friends and meeting new people. There are also a lot of other opportunities to get involved with, this year we done an over night live broadcast in the studio for the UK Elections which was great fun! I know I am doing TV not film production but I imagine the courses would be similar. Also the university is well known for it's media courses so its worth considering!

    In regards to your last question, I personally am glad I took more of a practical degree rather than theoretical one. If you enjoy being hands on then definitely stick to production. You will develop quickly and have lots of productions to put on your showreel to show future employers once you have graduated.

    Hope this helped and if you have any other questions feel free to ask

    Gemma
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    [QUOTE=KBradders;58820467]Well Bournemouth University, both the course and university is bad for a lot of reasons.

    The course:
    Final Cut Pro is not taught on the course, neither is studio lighting or script writing. In regards to FCP, to this day the website advertises the course as teaching this software. The structure is incredibly poor. One moment you're filming a documentary, the next you're filming a drama, then a fashion show before shortly afterwards you're doing a music show. Sounds good? It does until you realise these productions are crammed together with barely any time to develop your knowledge of the genre. I've had staff tell me that we're expected to know everything from the day we start the course, so what am I paying £27,000 for? I am paying to just slog my guts out being a film production line, and not a good one at that.

    Of course there are upsides to the course, like there are good guest speakers so there are some networking opportunities available.

    The university itself:
    A complete shambles in my opinion. I am a DSA student with multiple health issues and have had no support. Note-takers forgotten to be implemented, extra-time not given in 3 out of 4 exams, and after a recent operation I was forced into university whilst in a wheelchair and high on morphine 5 days after the procedure.

    The university seems to also have a culture of supporting unpaid work. I was in a career's lecture where the advisor was telling us to expect unpaid work, what she didn't say is that unpaid work is illegal! The university advertises opportunities that should be paid NMW by law as well, for example SportBU wanted a student photographer with their own kit to take pictures of sporting activities for publication.


    What I do really hate is when people comment on BU with absolutely no knowledge of the place, basically hearing things on the grapevine.[/QUOTE/]

    What a negative post.
    Culture of supporting unpaid work? Clearly.

    They don't FORCE you to work for anything extra curricular or outside of your subject, it's a choice, something that someone may enjoy as a hobby.
    If someone does photography (or something similar) and one of the SportBU teams or coaches ask them to go along to a game and record or take pictures, that's totally down to them, like I said, they may just want to do it as a hobby and have some spare time to kill.

    As to the complaints/comments about mental health and not getting the help you need or being made to come into University, I can't comment on that as I do not, or have not had these problems.
    Offline

    11
    ReputationRep:
    I think you misread about my health issues - I have multiple health issues, not mental health problems.

    I think you're talking about something different. This was an advertised "voluntary" position for two photographers to take pictures for publication, that required a covering letter, a portfolio check and interview. Being asked by teams or coaches to record games is a bit of a different story. When you are producing work for someone to make a commercial gain out of it, you should be rightly paid.

    I will also add that BU paid me in Amazon vouchers for a job that was advertised as PAID - no mention of being paid in vouchers. Again, this should not be happening. If a job is advertised as paid and I submit my NI number, I expect to have payment in my bank account and for it to have gone through payroll. I don't see day runner jobs in TV being paid in shop vouchers.

    I have a right to make a negative post as much as I do a positive one. Prospective students have a right to see both sides to a university.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    You never said it was advertised as paid, you just said that BU has adopted a culture of unpaid work, not that you were offered work that was advertised as paid and received no money as I'm sure this is not the case with everyone and it is unfortunate that it did happen to you, but Amazon vouchers are better than nothing I guess!

    I totally agree that prospective students should see both sides to every Uni.
    Offline

    11
    ReputationRep:
    Unpaid work - I was referring to the photographer role particularly. No you're not forced to apply but it is damaging to the photography profession as a whole. It devalues the skill. It's not just this role though, many opportunities I saw advertised as unpaid on myBU that should be paid is quite ridiculous.

    In terms of the Amazon vouchers - quite a few people have been paid in the form of these! Yes it is better than nothing, but that is not the point. Any other business wouldn't get away with paying in vouchers so why should BU? They wouldn't like it if their salaries were paid in vouchers, it would be like going back to WWII rations.
 
 
 
Reply
Submit reply
Turn on thread page Beta
Updated: September 8, 2015

University open days

  • University of East Anglia (UEA)
    Could you inspire the next generation? Find out more about becoming a Secondary teacher with UEA… Postgraduate
    Thu, 18 Oct '18
  • University of Warwick
    Undergraduate Open Days Undergraduate
    Sat, 20 Oct '18
  • University of Sheffield
    Undergraduate Open Days Undergraduate
    Sat, 20 Oct '18
Poll
Who is most responsible for your success at university

The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

Write a reply...
Reply
Hide
Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.