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How to you avoid muscle imbalances when weightlifting, is this an ok session? watch

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    I would like to increase my strenth in the gym and improve my physique a little. I'm currently losing a bit of weight so can't really start properly yet but I want to plan a few exercises for when I start properly. I don't want to cause any muscle imbalances or anything as I have a bit of anterior pelvic tilt, not diagnosed but my stomach sticks out even though I'm slim and I have a pronounced lumber curve. So yea I'd like to know if I'm missing any major muscles out that could cause an imbalance, is this a decent session or am I missing any muscles out that should really be strengthened too?

    Bicep curls 3 sets ( x 3)
    Tricep dips x 3
    Front arm raises dumbells, for deltoids x3
    Lateral raises x3
    Inclined Bench press x 3
    Pull ups x 3
    Leg raises (for abbs)
    Squats x3
    Hamstring curls x3

    Maybe I should do arms/chest and abbs/legs on seperate days
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    Whats your current height/weight/strength levels?
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    No disrespect intended, but that is a pretty abysmal session plan...for anyone; there are far to many isolation movements involved and only three compound movements (bench, pull ups, squats).

    As a beginner, you can make great gains with compound movements alone (exercises that use more than one muscle), so I would focus on: bench press, press, row, squat, and deadlift. Those five exercises will work everything, but if you feel that a certain part of your body isn't responding the way it should then you can add an isolation exercise here and there. (A lot depends on what you have access to in your gym though).

    A couple of caveats:
    Learn correct form! - The internet is full of great videos on how to perform movements correctly. Watch them. Learn. If you learn how to do it incorrectly you are setting yourself up for injury. Better yet, get someone to show you at the gym.
    Get yourself cleared for exercise by a professional - It's all well and good taking someone's advice over the internet, but I don't know how bad your back is or by how much/little it affects your physical abilities. Would you even be able to do a deadlift or squat, for example, without messing yourself up?
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    (Original post by TheThiefOfBagdad)
    No disrespect intended, but that is a pretty abysmal session plan...for anyone; there are far to many isolation movements involved and only three compound movements (bench, pull ups, squats).

    As a beginner, you can make great gains with compound movements alone (exercises that use more than one muscle), so I would focus on: bench press, press, row, squat, and deadlift. Those five exercises will work everything, but if you feel that a certain part of your body isn't responding the way it should then you can add an isolation exercise here and there. (A lot depends on what you have access to in your gym though).

    A couple of caveats:
    Learn correct form! - The internet is full of great videos on how to perform movements correctly. Watch them. Learn. If you learn how to do it incorrectly you are setting yourself up for injury. Better yet, get someone to show you at the gym.
    Get yourself cleared for exercise by a professional - It's all well and good taking someone's advice over the internet, but I don't know how bad your back is or by how much/little it affects your physical abilities. Would you even be able to do a deadlift or squat, for example, without messing yourself up?
    I completely agree. Add some chinups to those 5 movements and you really don't need anything else. They work the biceps, you don't need curls. Maybe some face pulls or some other rear delt exercise might be beneficial for shoulder health. Certainly never do front delt raises like the OP is doing, they get overworked massively with the press and bench press.
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    (Original post by BenCampbell)
    I completely agree. Add some chinups to those 5 movements and you really don't need anything else. They work the biceps, you don't need curls. Maybe some face pulls or some other rear delt exercise might be beneficial for shoulder health. Certainly never do front delt raises like the OP is doing, they get overworked massively with the press and bench press.
    And I agree with all of that. I suggested rows instead of chin ups is because I assume the original poster is a beginner and most beginners can't do chin ups.
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    (Original post by Redfrost)
    I would like to increase my strenth in the gym and improve my physique a little. I'm currently losing a bit of weight so can't really start properly yet but I want to plan a few exercises for when I start properly. I don't want to cause any muscle imbalances or anything as I have a bit of anterior pelvic tilt, not diagnosed but my stomach sticks out even though I'm slim and I have a pronounced lumber curve. So yea I'd like to know if I'm missing any major muscles out that could cause an imbalance, is this a decent session or am I missing any muscles out that should really be strengthened too?

    Bicep curls 3 sets ( x 3)
    Tricep dips x 3
    Front arm raises dumbells, for deltoids x3
    Lateral raises x3
    Inclined Bench press x 3
    Pull ups x 3
    Leg raises (for abbs)
    Squats x3
    Hamstring curls x3

    Maybe I should do arms/chest and abbs/legs on seperate days
    Since you have anterior pelvic tilt you should be doing some specific work on your glutes and abs. I'd advise againt leg raises for abs as it's very easy to fatigue your hip flexors first and end up not doing a huge amount of ab work. Other than that, I'd recommend choosing a 'tried-and-tested' routine rather than making up your own. There are some decent ones on http://forum.bodybuilding.com/forumdisplay.php?f=8
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    (Original post by TheThiefOfBagdad)
    And I agree with all of that. I suggested rows instead of chin ups is because I assume the original poster is a beginner and most beginners can't do chin ups.
    Im fine with chin ups used to do 14 I can only do 6 at moment tho.
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    (Original post by Implication)
    Since you have anterior pelvic tilt you should be doing some specific work on your glutes and abs. I'd advise againt leg raises for abs as it's very easy to fatigue your hip flexors first and end up not doing a huge amount of ab work. Other than that, I'd recommend choosing a 'tried-and-tested' routine rather than making up your own. There are some decent ones on http://forum.bodybuilding.com/forumdisplay.php?f=8
    Ok thanks will have a look
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    (Original post by BenCampbell)
    Whats your current height/weight/strength levels?
    5ft, 117 pounds and at the moment I feel ok doing 3 sets of 16 x bicep curls with 10 kg dumbells and front arm raises with 7 kg. Although I'm probably better using a lower weight for bicep curls too to get the best technique Pull ups I'm currently on 6 and squats I can manage 3 sets of 7 with 30kg (using a squat machine), I do these to help with running/ sprinting.
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    (Original post by TheThiefOfBagdad)
    No disrespect intended, but that is a pretty abysmal session plan...for anyone; there are far to many isolation movements involved and only three compound movements (bench, pull ups, squats).

    As a beginner, you can make great gains with compound movements alone (exercises that use more than one muscle), so I would focus on: bench press, press, row, squat, and deadlift. Those five exercises will work everything, but if you feel that a certain part of your body isn't responding the way it should then you can add an isolation exercise here and there. (A lot depends on what you have access to in your gym though).

    A couple of caveats:
    Learn correct form! - The internet is full of great videos on how to perform movements correctly. Watch them. Learn. If you learn how to do it incorrectly you are setting yourself up for injury. Better yet, get someone to show you at the gym.
    Get yourself cleared for exercise by a professional - It's all well and good taking someone's advice over the internet, but I don't know how bad your back is or by how much/little it affects your physical abilities. Would you even be able to do a deadlift or squat, for example, without messing yourself up?
    Is it possible to replace the barbell deadlift with a dumbell deadlift or is it a waste if time
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    (Original post by Redfrost)
    5ft, 117 pounds and at the moment I feel ok doing 3 sets of 16 x bicep curls with 10 kg dumbells and front arm raises with 7 kg. Although I'm probably better using a lower weight for bicep curls too to get the best technique Pull ups I'm currently on 6 and squats I can manage 3 sets of 7 with 30kg (using a squat machine), I do these to help with running/ sprinting.
    How often do you train?

    Some advice:
    Don't use a squat machine, don't do sets of 16 on bicep curls, and don't front raises either. Use a barbell for squats, in a power rack. You don't need bicep curls if you do heavy rows and chinups, but if you aren't going to listen to that advice, at least do them with heavier weight in the 8-12 rep range. By chinups I mean palms facing you/a supinated grip, pullups are with palms away from you/a pronated grip. Your front delts get way too much stimulation from bench pressing and overhead pressing, if you are going to do any isolation work for your delts do it for your rear delts.
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    (Original post by Redfrost)
    Is it possible to replace the barbell deadlift with a dumbell deadlift or is it a waste if time
    Why would you do that? I don't even think that is possible, unless you do a romanian deadlift. Even then you will have trouble getting heavy enough dumbbells.
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    (Original post by Redfrost)
    Is it possible to replace the barbell deadlift with a dumbell deadlift or is it a waste if time
    Almost surely a waste of time. You could replace with a different deadlift variation (e.g. Romanian deadlift) if you wanted but I don't see why you would want to!
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    (Original post by Redfrost)
    Is it possible to replace the barbell deadlift with a dumbell deadlift or is it a waste if time
    It wouldn't be a waste of time, per se, but it wouldn't really be the same thing at all.
    Have a look into the variations and 'substitutes' and see what's possible for you, because doing some kind of deadlift movement is better than none at all; the deadlift is the single best exercise (in terms of muscle fibre recruitment).
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    That routine is a disaster. If you don't know enough, don't make your own routines

    Read the FAQ. Rules apply to all

    http://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/show....php?t=3014757

    (Original post by Implication)
    Almost surely a waste of time. You could replace with a different deadlift variation (e.g. Romanian deadlift) if you wanted but I don't see why you would want to!
    Trust yourself mayne. A DB deadlift is a tremendous waste of time
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    (Original post by Angry cucumber)
    That routine is a disaster. If you don't know enough, don't make your own routines

    Read the FAQ. Rules apply to all

    http://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/show....php?t=3014757



    Trust yourself mayne. A DB deadlift is a tremendous waste of time
    You haven't said why it's a disaster, what muscles I'm missing etc I'm just trying to include the opposites ie abbs back, bicep/tricep, squats, hamstrings. So I should forget about the front arm raises and exercises that don't really work compound/large areas of muscle then. Though Some of those exercises are the main ones I need for my running and sports events ( squats, inclined bench press, pull ups and hamstring curls) so they are not a disaster for that but that's all I've been focusing on I just want to make sure I don't cause any muscle imbalances and was looking for a proper weightlifting routine. Maybe I should ask a physio about the anterior pelvic tilt too. I'm struggling with my diet too I'm eating very low carb meals and feel hungry all the time I lost weight last time but for some reason this time seems harder.
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    (Original post by BenCampbell)
    Why would you do that? I don't even think that is possible, unless you do a romanian deadlift. Even then you will have trouble getting heavy enough dumbbells.
    I will look on youtube for the proper technique. See I won't have a spotter/anyone with me I will be on my own.
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    Ok yea just been reading about the strong lifts routine the actual routine seems simple enough I like the look of it I will just need to practice the deadlift and overhead press after making sure I have the right technique. As I said I have no spotter will just be in the weights room on my own so are most people ok doing these exercises on their own or is a spotter essential? Also, because I do a lot of sport/running throughout the week do you think twice a week will be enough for some muscle again, as opposed to 3 times a week as the programme recommends? I could do the weight routine twice a week and spend the extra day on strengthening abbs as I know I need to strengthen abbs in particular.
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    imho a spotter is not necessary until you are pushing serious weight. I am an intermediate lifter and have never needed one. I DO, however, stress the need for a power rack - if you fail a lift without one you could, as a worst case scenario, kill yourself (this is very unlikely, I'm just stressing the point - be safe!).

    Abs don't need a lot doing to them for them to get strong; a whole session dedicated to them isn't going to be of any huge benefit. That said, you can progress perfectly well, albeit a bit slower, doing strong lifts twice a week, so if that suits you then go for it.

    If you are doing other sports and running as well then you will need to be eating a lot in order to gain weight. I'm sure this is obvious to you but I thought it worth mentioning.
    If you want an idea of how many calories you need in order to successfully gain muscle, then you could do a lot worse than this website -
    http://iifym.com/tdee-calculator/

    (I do not personally endorse all of the information on that page, even though it's mostly accurate, but the TDEE tool half way down it is very useful.)
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    (Original post by Redfrost)
    Ok yea just been reading about the strong lifts routine the actual routine seems simple enough I like the look of it I will just need to practice the deadlift and overhead press after making sure I have the right technique. As I said I have no spotter will just be in the weights room on my own so are most people ok doing these exercises on their own or is a spotter essential? Also, because I do a lot of sport/running throughout the week do you think twice a week will be enough for some muscle again, as opposed to 3 times a week as the programme recommends? I could do the weight routine twice a week and spend the extra day on strengthening abbs as I know I need to strengthen abbs in particular.
    If you are training twice a week I wouldn't do stronglifts. Because of the A/B style you will only be hitting bench, ohp, rows and deadlifts once a week. I would do something like this on monday & thursday, or any two days that are spaced apart enough...
    Squats - 4x6
    Bench - 4x6
    Deadlifts - 2x6
    OHP - 4x6
    Chinups - 4x6

    You don't really need a spotter. It can be helpful for the bench press to get a lift off but you can use a power rack for safety. You definitely don't need a spotter for deadlifts, if you fail the weight falls to the floor, not like bench press where it falls on your neck.

    Heavy squats, deadlifts, overhead presses and chinups will be enough for your abs. Especially if you do them belt-less. Do some planks at home if you really want to do some ab work, you certainly don't need an entire day in the gym for your abs.
 
 
 
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