Turn on thread page Beta
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    11
    ReputationRep:
    Is it possible to go to law school in the US after doing an undergrad in the UK in PPE?
    Offline

    13
    ReputationRep:
    I'd also love to hear an answer to this as it's something I plan on doing - same degree and everything. I don't see why it wouldn't be possible though?


    Posted from TSR Mobile
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    I think as long as you have an undergraduate degree in any subject, just as they will have to have, then you are eligible to take the JD in America. I see no reason why their undergrad would qualify them to take it, but not ours.

    Obviously the only obstacle is the $100,000 per year it will cost you to take it. JDs and LLMs in the U.S. are extremely costly!

    Good luck to you both.


    Posted from TSR Mobile
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    11
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by AGT95)
    I think as long as you have an undergraduate degree in any subject, just as they will have to have, then you are eligible to take the JD in America. I see no reason why their undergrad would qualify them to take it, but not ours.

    Obviously the only obstacle is the $100,000 per year it will cost you to take it. JDs and LLMs in the U.S. are extremely costly!

    Good luck to you both.


    Posted from TSR Mobile
    $100,000 isn't a particular barrier but I thought it was around $60,000 per year? I could always try to get it paid for by an emplyer to stop my parents shelling out but financials aren't really a problem.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    11
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Nomes24)
    I'd also love to hear an answer to this as it's something I plan on doing - same degree and everything. I don't see why it wouldn't be possible though?


    Posted from TSR Mobile
    Qualifications n that. Basically whether a UK undergrad is valid.
    • TSR Support Team
    Offline

    21
    ReputationRep:
    TSR Support Team
    If you can afford the $200-250k price tag, study a non-law related degree here then try to apply to one of the top 14 Law Schools in the US for a JD.

    The reason I've stipulated T14 is because after that point, your chances of landing a BigLaw or Clerk role (within the supreme court/District Attorney's office) drastically decrease, that is unless you manage to be in the top 1% of your class. Even at a T14 school, you'll have to work your butt off to get into the top 25th-50th percentile in order to have better prospects.

    Alternatively, if you aren't completely flowing with money, you can gain a training contract in the UK - after studying a law degree or non-law + GDL - then transfer over upon qualification. This, however, comes with the restriction of passing the Bar exam in the desired state's jurisdiction, of which only NY and CA allow foreign educated Lawyers to sit without a US JD.

    Either way, the path is a long and arduous one.


    Posted from TSR Mobile
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Princepieman)
    Alternatively, if you aren't completely flowing with money, you can gain a training contract in the UK - after studying a law degree or non-law + GDL - then transfer over upon qualification. This, however, comes with the restriction of passing the Bar exam in the desired state's jurisdiction, of which only NY and CA allow foreign educated Lawyers to sit without a US JD.

    Either way, the path is a long and arduous one.

    Posted from TSR Mobile
    NY or California will not accept a non law degree + GLD. Both will require at least the LPC or BPTC, in the case of New York they would probably require a TC too. Both are also likely to require a 1 year LLM in U.S. law (this because the GDL is only 1 year and the LPC another year so you need to cure a durational deficiency of 2 years of law school vs. 3 years in the U.S.).
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by cleverasvoltaire)
    $100,000 isn't a particular barrier but I thought it was around $60,000 per year? I could always try to get it paid for by an emplyer to stop my parents shelling out but financials aren't really a problem.
    No employer will pay for your law school in the U.S (nothing like the UK where some employers pay for the GDL + LPC)
    but if financials are not an issue, yes you ca

    A British undergraduate degree is perfectly fine for admission purposes. You will need a good LSAT (entry test).
    • TSR Support Team
    Offline

    21
    ReputationRep:
    TSR Support Team
    (Original post by christianlaw)
    NY or California will not accept a non law degree + GLD. Both will require at least the LPC or BPTC, in the case of New York they would probably require a TC too. Both are also likely to require a 1 year LLM in U.S. law (this because the GDL is only 1 year and the LPC another year so you need to cure a durational deficiency of 2 years of law school vs. 3 years in the U.S.).
    Um, no. I did mention obtaining a TC and transferring (with the same firm) 'upon qualification' - i.e. after the 2 years. You can sit the NY bar as a qualified solicitor in the UK. It's really not about fulfilling a 'defeciency', more about making sure the qualfications match up.
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Princepieman)
    Um, no. I did mention obtaining a TC and transferring (with the same firm) 'upon qualification' - i.e. after the 2 years. You can sit the NY bar as a qualified solicitor in the UK. It's really not about fulfilling a 'defeciency', more about making sure the qualfications match up.
    It won't match if you qualified without a law degree (e.g. with the GDL) : see Rule 520 6 (b) (2)
    "B. Rule 520.6 (b) (2) (English Common Law based on law school and law office study) has four major eligibility requirements:Admission to practice law in a foreign country whose jurisprudence is based upon the principles of the English Common Law.Admission is based on a program of study in a law school and/or law office that is recognized by the competent accrediting agency of the government of such other country. ....
    NOTE: Historically, applicants who qualify under Rule 520.6 (b) (2) are solicitors or barristers in English Common Law jurisdictions who do not have an LLB degree but who are admitted to practice based on successful completion of the Common Professional Examination course, the Graduate Diploma in Law or the Bar Vocational Course, together with a practical skills course, and a training contract (i.e., articles), the aggregate of which must satisfy the durational equivalency requirements. They will also need to complete an LLM or Master of Laws program at an approved law school in the United States pursuant to the “cure” provision"

    So I am afraid but you as a Solicitor qualified with the GDL you will need to cure a durational deficiency.
    In order to do that you need a U.S. LL.M (residential, 1 year).
    • TSR Support Team
    Offline

    21
    ReputationRep:
    TSR Support Team
    (Original post by christianlaw)
    It won't match if you qualified without a law degree (e.g. with the GDL) : see Rule 520 6 (b) (2)
    "B. Rule 520.6 (b) (2) (English Common Law based on law school and law office study) has four major eligibility requirements:Admission to practice law in a foreign country whose jurisprudence is based upon the principles of the English Common Law.Admission is based on a program of study in a law school and/or law office that is recognized by the competent accrediting agency of the government of such other country. ....
    NOTE: Historically, applicants who qualify under Rule 520.6 (b) (2) are solicitors or barristers in English Common Law jurisdictions who do not have an LLB degree but who are admitted to practice based on successful completion of the Common Professional Examination course, the Graduate Diploma in Law or the Bar Vocational Course, together with a practical skills course, and a training contract (i.e., articles), the aggregate of which must satisfy the durational equivalency requirements. They will also need to complete an LLM or Master of Laws program at an approved law school in the United States pursuant to the “cure” provision"

    So I am afraid but you as a Solicitor qualified with the GDL you will need to cure a durational deficiency.
    In order to do that you need a U.S. LL.M (residential, 1 year).
    I stand corrected, thank you.
 
 
 
Reply
Submit reply
Turn on thread page Beta
Updated: August 23, 2015

University open days

  • Sheffield Hallam University
    City Campus Postgraduate
    Wed, 17 Oct '18
  • Staffordshire University
    Nursing and Midwifery Undergraduate
    Wed, 17 Oct '18
  • Teesside University
    Undergraduate open day Undergraduate
    Wed, 17 Oct '18
Poll
Who is most responsible for your success at university

The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

Write a reply...
Reply
Hide
Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.