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    Would it be more beneficial to take Natural Science and do Psychology+Neuroscience in the second year or just go straight for the Psychology course? I heard that becoming a clinical psychologist is extremely difficult so maybe doing Natural Science allows more career options if things don't work out?

    This based on the UCL Natural Science course btw I don't know if other unis do the same. I'm about start A Levels and I'm thinking about my future

    Also I'm doing Psychology, Biology, Maths and Spanish for my A Levels
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    In theory, it doesn't matter as long as the degree is accredited by the BPS. As for widening your choices, a lot of jobs don't need specific degrees, so it would depend on what the NatSci course would allow you to do extra
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    (Original post by blitzchika)
    Would it be more beneficial to take Natural Science and do Psychology+Neuroscience in the second year or just go straight for the Psychology course? I heard that becoming a clinical psychologist is extremely difficult so maybe doing Natural Science allows more career options if things don't work out?

    This based on the UCL Natural Science course btw I don't know if other unis do the same. I'm about start A Levels and I'm thinking about my future

    Also I'm doing Psychology, Biology, Maths and Spanish for my A Levels
    Doing neuroscience doesn't necessarily open up many more doors. Having a strong biology background would be useful if you wanted to do teaching/research in that area. A lot of graduate jobs as the above poster said, don't require a specific degree. I can't really think of many jobs (outside of research/teaching) that would require a neuroscience degree, so it wouldn't necessarily make your more employable.

    Natsci however can make you a bit more rounded knowledge wise rather than doing a single degree choice, and may be advantageous if you also decide that you change your mind in second year and want to specialise in something else. I'd check if doing chemistry is necessary for natural sciences - i think it is for the cambridge course!
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    (Original post by *Interrobang*)
    In theory, it doesn't matter as long as the degree is accredited by the BPS. As for widening your choices, a lot of jobs don't need specific degrees, so it would depend on what the NatSci course would allow you to do extra
    Thanks very much
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    (Original post by iammichealjackson)
    Doing neuroscience doesn't necessarily open up many more doors. Having a strong biology background would be useful if you wanted to do teaching/research in that area. A lot of graduate jobs as the above poster said, don't require a specific degree. I can't really think of many jobs (outside of research/teaching) that would require a neuroscience degree, so it wouldn't necessarily make your more employable.

    Natsci however can make you a bit more rounded knowledge wise rather than doing a single degree choice, and may be advantageous if you also decide that you change your mind in second year and want to specialise in something else. I'd check if doing chemistry is necessary for natural sciences - i think it is for the cambridge course!
    Thanks for the info! I've thought about doing Chemistry cause I got an A* at GCSE but I find it extremely boring :/
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    It's better to go down the straight psychology route. The course would also need to be BPS accredited (as another poster has already stated). After that you'd need to do post-graduate studies - I'm probably going to get some experience in research as a research assistant and clinical experience within the NHS and then go on to do my MSc and then finally DClinPsy. I've not chosen where yet though (I'm just about to go into my third year). It would also be beneficial to get 2.1 or above (1st is obviously better) in your undergraduate degree.

    I'd also recommend doing chemistry at A Level, however don't take it if you don't think you'd put the work in for it.
 
 
 
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