How do pathogens adapt to different host environments during chronic infections?

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rm_27
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Hey guys,

Basically the title. I tried doing some research, and I don't quite get it. Make your answer simple to understand!

Thank you.
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Eloades11
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(Original post by rm_27)
Hey guys,

Basically the title. I tried doing some research, and I don't quite get it. Make your answer simple to understand!

Thank you.
Hey,

If you really wanted to, you could probably write an essay on this subject and then some.

The point being, there are a vast range of pathogens which are capable of doing this (from the top of my head, HIV, Epstein-Barr, HSV, Tuberculosis), and I could probably come up with more examples after I finish writing this. All of them have different methods. To give a couple of brief examples, TB gets taken up by macrophages and avoids degradation by lysozymes allowing it to survive inside the macrophage. There's then a process where a cheesy layer filled with dead macrophages which allows the bacterium to remain undetected inside the lungs. The other example is HSV which can remain dormant or maintain a chronic infection by getting inside neurones and by retrograde transport to travel in the opposite direction (this may be slightly off, it's been a while since I covered this).

Basically, they all have ways of overcoming the immune system in order to go undetected but will still cause disease.
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rm_27
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(Original post by Eloades11)
Hey,

If you really wanted to, you could probably write an essay on this subject and then some.

The point being, there are a vast range of pathogens which are capable of doing this (from the top of my head, HIV, Epstein-Barr, HSV, Tuberculosis), and I could probably come up with more examples after I finish writing this. All of them have different methods. To give a couple of brief examples, TB gets taken up by macrophages and avoids degradation by lysozymes allowing it to survive inside the macrophage. There's then a process where a cheesy layer filled with dead macrophages which allows the bacterium to remain undetected inside the lungs. The other example is HSV which can remain dormant or maintain a chronic infection by getting inside neurones and by retrograde transport to travel in the opposite direction (this may be slightly off, it's been a while since I covered this).

Basically, they all have ways of overcoming the immune system in order to go undetected but will still cause disease.

Heya, thanks for the explanation! Do you know any resources I can use, such as books/articles which go more in depth with this?
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Eloades11
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(Original post by rm_27)
Heya, thanks for the explanation! Do you know any resources I can use, such as books/articles which go more in depth with this?
There are many resources available within a quick google search away. I would recommend reading some reviews on the topics, you can probably find a good research article to read on the topic of your choice if you search google
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