Need immediate advice after declining firm choice Watch

Apropos
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This is my first post on student room, forgive me for any mistakes. I am new to the process.

Long story short. Had last minute doubts about going to firm choice to study pure Philosophy - job prospects, city life, culture of university (not high and as academic), fitting in with such degree, not as prestigious.
Advised by Philosophy teacher to go to insurance choice even though there is a foundation year as prominent Philosophers taught there in the past. However is very far away and in the middle of nowhere up north.
After much thought, have decided to study at firm however have declined and am told not able to be reconsidered - I know that they can send me a verbal offer and admissions just need to give it the OK and it will go through.
Thing is, I got into my firm choice initially on slightly lower points (40pts) now they are saying I am too low if I were apply through clearing (when accepted initially) and need approval from course leader - emailed course leader but obviously all academics away during summer and received an automated response saying it will not be read.
I really need advice, I plan to call admissions tomorrow that obviously I can't get in touch with course leader, but then again this is not a typical clearing offer so am lost for words.
What can I do to convince admissions to accept me - there are still clearing places available so not exactly full.
I realise that I have made a decision too hastily and should've given it another night to think about rather than just go ahead with the switch. I feel broken…

Anyone who have gotten into their firm choice after such circumstances.

What reasons can I give to make them reconsider me - the other university eventually gave me a place despite being full because I took Philosophy a year ago and my results didn't show up immediately so I know that it is possible.

Thanks
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SlowlorisIncognito
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(Original post by Apropos)
This is my first post on student room, forgive me for any mistakes. I am new to the process.

Long story short. Had last minute doubts about going to firm choice to study pure Philosophy - job prospects, city life, culture of university (not high and as academic), fitting in with such degree, not as prestigious.
Advised by Philosophy teacher to go to insurance choice even though there is a foundation year as prominent Philosophers taught there in the past. However is very far away and in the middle of nowhere up north.
After much thought, have decided to study at firm however have declined and am told not able to be reconsidered - I know that they can send me a verbal offer and admissions just need to give it the OK and it will go through.
Thing is, I got into my firm choice initially on slightly lower points (40pts) now they are saying I am too low if I were apply through clearing (when accepted initially) and need approval from course leader - emailed course leader but obviously all academics away during summer and received an automated response saying it will not be read.
I really need advice, I plan to call admissions tomorrow that obviously I can't get in touch with course leader, but then again this is not a typical clearing offer so am lost for words.
What can I do to convince admissions to accept me - there are still clearing places available so not exactly full.
I realise that I have made a decision too hastily and should've given it another night to think about rather than just go ahead with the switch. I feel broken…

Anyone who have gotten into their firm choice after such circumstances.

What reasons can I give to make them reconsider me - the other university eventually gave me a place despite being full because I took Philosophy a year ago and my results didn't show up immediately so I know that it is possible.

Thanks
If you have been released from your firm offer, they are not obliged to reconsider you. Regardless of whether they appear to have clearing spaces or not, they can decide they don't want someone who's potentially not very enthusiastic about the university course at this time. Unfortunately this is the risk you take when you ask to be released from an offer.

Universities all set their own admissions policies, so what another uni does won't have any bearing on what your firm chooses to do.

There unfortunately aren't any magic words you can say tomorrow to get them to accept you. Contact admissions by all means, but if the answer is no, unfortunately you will have to accept that and move on to plan b.
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Apropos
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(Original post by SlowlorisIncognito)
If you have been released from your firm offer, they are not obliged to reconsider you. Regardless of whether they appear to have clearing spaces or not, they can decide they don't want someone who's potentially not very enthusiastic about the university course at this time. Unfortunately this is the risk you take when you ask to be released from an offer.

Universities all set their own admissions policies, so what another uni does won't have any bearing on what your firm chooses to do.

There unfortunately aren't any magic words you can say tomorrow to get them to accept you. Contact admissions by all means, but if the answer is no, unfortunately you will have to accept that and move on to plan b.
I can assure you I am extremely enthusiastic to do this course. Philosophy is my strength and major interest.
Reason I had doubts considering to do pure Philosophy is the job prospects for it so looked to combine it with Economics which I also done at A level. Hence the foundation year course - this leads to dual honours in Phil and Econ
However with the insurance choice it is very far away and I am British East Asian so have doubts with fitting in and keeping friendships coming from so far away down South.

When I called up my insurance university, their admissions team were throwing the book at me - it is the terms and conditions, we are technically full so can only consider applicants for the next academic year, once your firm choice accept you your insurance is null by default. I phoned the foundation year team to state that I was informed that I had a place if I wanted to take it, they realised that their systems did not reflect all my results and there was confusion with my name. Against all odds they finally accepted me - so it is possible.

FYI the universities in question have 16 places between them in the overall Complete University Guide table - the firm being 16 places below the insurance but the insurance having a history for Philosophy.
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PQ
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(Original post by Apropos)
I can assure you I am extremely enthusiastic to do this course. Philosophy is my strength and major interest.
Reason I had doubts considering to do pure Philosophy is the job prospects for it so looked to combine it with Economics which I also done at A level. Hence the foundation year course - this leads to dual honours in Phil and Econ
However with the insurance choice it is very far away and I am British East Asian so have doubts with fitting in and keeping friendships coming from so far away down South.

When I called up my insurance university, their admissions team were throwing the book at me - it is the terms and conditions, we are technically full so can only consider applicants for the next academic year, once your firm choice accept you your insurance is null by default. I phoned the foundation year team to state that I was informed that I had a place if I wanted to take it, they realised that their systems did not reflect all my results and there was confusion with my name. Against all odds they finally accepted me - so it is possible.

FYI the universities in question have 16 places between them in the overall Complete University Guide table - the firm being 16 places below the insurance but the insurance having a history for Philosophy.
The problem is that you asked your firm to reject you a week ago and now you're asking to be taken back.

Unfortunately from a university point of view that seems extremely risky and uncommitted - you may have had good reason for trying to go to your insurance instead at the time but someone who has changed their mind twice in less than a fortnight is not an attractive prospect to a university.

Ringing again is a good idea - if only to be sure in your own mind. But to be perfectly honest it sounds like what you would benefit from most is not going to your firm or insurance but taking a year out to properly research your universities (employment prospects, location, course content etc) and reapplying in a few months time when you're a bit more certain about what you want to study and which university you want to study at.
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SlowlorisIncognito
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(Original post by Apropos)
I can assure you I am extremely enthusiastic to do this course. Philosophy is my strength and major interest.
Reason I had doubts considering to do pure Philosophy is the job prospects for it so looked to combine it with Economics which I also done at A level. Hence the foundation year course - this leads to dual honours in Phil and Econ
However with the insurance choice it is very far away and I am British East Asian so have doubts with fitting in and keeping friendships coming from so far away down South.

When I called up my insurance university, their admissions team were throwing the book at me - it is the terms and conditions, we are technically full so can only consider applicants for the next academic year, once your firm choice accept you your insurance is null by default. I phoned the foundation year team to state that I was informed that I had a place if I wanted to take it, they realised that their systems did not reflect all my results and there was confusion with my name. Against all odds they finally accepted me - so it is possible.

FYI the universities in question have 16 places between them in the overall Complete University Guide table - the firm being 16 places below the insurance but the insurance having a history for Philosophy.
Ultimately, it's not me you have to convince- and I know it is technically possible for unis to do almost anything they want to. The thing is, they also don't have to. There's no magic words you can say to them that will make them accept you, and they aren't behaving unfairly, so UCAS won't be willing to get involved.

You need to be able to convince your firm you are not just committed to philosophy as a degree, but them as an institution. Having rejected them as your firm, this will be very hard to do.

I hope you get the outcome you want- but if you don't, certainly spending a gap year figuring out your options will not be the end of the world.

Good Luck.
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Apropos
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(Original post by PQ)
The problem is that you asked your firm to reject you a week ago and now you're asking to be taken back.

Unfortunately from a university point of view that seems extremely risky and uncommitted - you may have had good reason for trying to go to your insurance instead at the time but someone who has changed their mind twice in less than a fortnight is not an attractive prospect to a university.

Ringing again is a good idea - if only to be sure in your own mind. But to be perfectly honest it sounds like what you would benefit from most is not going to your firm or insurance but taking a year out to properly research your universities (employment prospects, location, course content etc) and reapplying in a few months time when you're a bit more certain about what you want to study and which university you want to study at.
I definitely am going to be ringing - was unable to get hold of anyone today but certainly will do. Taking a year out is not a good idea for me to be honest as I am 25 in November and am technically a mature student - I went into work after school and have used up enough time. I realise I have been cold feet and been indecisive but don't intend on using up anymore. I have looked at all of this stuff but have always had to banish creeping doubts that always come up, now I am at ease.
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Apropos
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(Original post by SlowlorisIncognito)
Ultimately, it's not me you have to convince- and I know it is technically possible for unis to do almost anything they want to. The thing is, they also don't have to. There's no magic words you can say to them that will make them accept you, and they aren't behaving unfairly, so UCAS won't be willing to get involved.

You need to be able to convince your firm you are not just committed to philosophy as a degree, but them as an institution. Having rejected them as your firm, this will be very hard to do.

I hope you get the outcome you want- but if you don't, certainly spending a gap year figuring out your options will not be the end of the world.

Good Luck.
I appreciate your advice SlowlorisIncognito, what do you suggest that I say to them in order to convince them? Obviously not telling the entire truth would be beneficial - what do you suggest?
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SlowlorisIncognito
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(Original post by Apropos)
I appreciate your advice SlowlorisIncognito, what do you suggest that I say to them in order to convince them? Obviously not telling the entire truth would be beneficial - what do you suggest?
Unfortunately I don't know what will convince them. There may be nothing you can say that will persuade them. I'm not sure lying is ideal- you may end up tripping yourself up.
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Apropos
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(Original post by SlowlorisIncognito)
Unfortunately I don't know what will convince them. There may be nothing you can say that will persuade them. I'm not sure lying is ideal- you may end up tripping yourself up.
I called up the university early in the morning once they opened and got a really helpful lady on the line, I explained it all honestly, she understood the situation and spoke with her manager and said it would be fine not a problem.

She told me I could apply through clearing and it would go over 100%.

Everything worked out well!

Anyone out there who finds themselves in this situation - give it a go.
It can work. There is always hope.

Now, aiming to secure my accomodation again and nail my Philosophy degree.
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