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    Hi,

    I'm currently doing 3 A-Levels at school and really wanted to take on Maths (Stats) as the fourth AS but I was not allowed as I got a C in GCSE Maths. I was doing the higher tier and really loved maths but I wished I worked harder, I barely put in any effort. I am willing to work very hard this time round.

    I was thinking of taking on Maths privately with NEC, however what's putting me down from doing that is that firstly it's really expensive and not worth the money at all. People that have taken on courses with NEC have been very disappointed. Also, I have to pay separately for sitting the exams (per unit) which is £50 per unit x3 = another £150 on top of the £500 for the course.

    Is it worth doing ? Should I instead self teach Maths AS ( edexcel). Buy my own books and do past papers, get help from people that have done Maths, there's lots of help on the Internet (Khan Academy, video's) and get some tuition near exam time??. I want to get an A/B? Is it possible??? I am willing to work very hard!

    Thankyou
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    I think there's a reason why a lot of colleges want people to have an A grade or higher in gcse maths to do A Level. I did gcse maths and gcse statistics and got A grades in both after not really working at all.

    AS maths is a shock! It's so difficult to learn anything from a text book and so useful to have a teacher physically explaining step by step how to do something. Then there's a LOT of content to learn and some of it will all be completely new. I did 4 AS levels last year and even though maths was sort of my 'fourth choice' I spent more time studying and doing homework than I did on anything else which affected my grades.

    I managed to get a B on AS maths which I'm so happy with, but I'm dropping it for september! My advice is actually listen to your teachers or tutors, because there's a reason they say no to having people with lower GCSE's on their course. They have years and years of experience with students and thy know exactly what people can achieve.

    But, if you truly believe that you can do it, get all the text books, a revision guide and use lots of online videos to guide you. Start to do past paper questions quickly and just keep practising! Good Luck


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    (Original post by Aleveltimes)
    I think there's a reason why a lot of colleges want people to have an A grade or higher in gcse maths to do A Level. I did gcse maths and gcse statistics and got A grades in both after not really working at all.

    AS maths is a shock! It's so difficult to learn anything from a text book and so useful to have a teacher physically explaining step by step how to do something. Then there's a LOT of content to learn and some of it will all be completely new. I did 4 AS levels last year and even though maths was sort of my 'fourth choice' I spent more time studying and doing homework than I did on anything else which affected my grades.

    I managed to get a B on AS maths which I'm so happy with, but I'm dropping it for september! My advice is actually listen to your teachers or tutors, because there's a reason they say no to having people with lower GCSE's on their course. They have years and years of experience with students and thy know exactly what people can achieve.

    But, if you truly believe that you can do it, get all the text books, a revision guide and use lots of online videos to guide you. Start to do past paper questions quickly and just keep practising! Good Luck


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    Hi , thank you so much for replying.
    I completely understand where you & teachers are coming from.
    It's just that I really enjoy maths and there's so much help out there. E.g I can even get helped at school as one of my teachers have offered to, also loads of people in my family done Maths so hopefully they can run me through it all.
    I will think about it and take your advice.

    What did you find hard about maths ? And if there's more advice you would give me if I took on Maths what would it be ?

    Thanks again!
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    (Original post by jasmine_6780)
    Hi,

    I'm currently doing 3 A-Levels at school and really wanted to take on Maths (Stats) as the fourth AS but I was not allowed as I got a C in GCSE Maths. I was doing the higher tier and really loved maths but I wished I worked harder, I barely put in any effort. I am willing to work very hard this time round.

    I was thinking of taking on Maths privately with NEC, however what's putting me down from doing that is that firstly it's really expensive and not worth the money at all. People that have taken on courses with NEC have been very disappointed. Also, I have to pay separately for sitting the exams (per unit) which is £50 per unit x3 = another £150 on top of the £500 for the course.

    Is it worth doing ? Should I instead self teach Maths AS ( edexcel). Buy my own books and do past papers, get help from people that have done Maths, there's lots of help on the Internet (Khan Academy, video's) and get some tuition near exam time??. I want to get an A/B? Is it possible??? I am willing to work very hard!

    Thankyou
    I hate to be rude, but a-level maths essentially starts off with the GCSE 'A*' topics and quickly advances to much higher level work

    a lot of people, who get A/A* at GCSE maths even end up with Us and Es! Maths tends to have a high GCSE requirement because statistically people with B or lower are much much more likely to struggle

    But, have a look and see if you can manage Core 1 topics now quite easily; despite being the easiest pure maths module (for most people), and understand it will get harder in Core 2, you might be fine

    Good luck on whatever your decision is
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    I would definitely say that it would be possible to do it, if you really love mathematics. I would maybe consider getting a tutor a little earlier than just exam time to help you out a little.

    To do this though you will need a LOT of motivation and you need to a tick to what you need to do and try to cut out a lot of the procrastination so what do you really sticks with you! Do EVERY exercise in the textbook and as many past papers you can do while understanding content and you'll be fine 👍🏼


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    I really do not want to put you off self teaching it as maths is a great subject to do and very rewarding.

    However have you considered the fact their is a reason you were not allowed to take it?

    Personally I got an A* in GCSE Maths, A at A2 and am predicted an A in Further Maths and I will still say Maths is hard. I struggled with the transition between GCSE and AS only really becoming comfortable in March and never really became comfortable with the A2 material. My point from this being that you will find it immensely difficult to make that transition because it's bigger for you.

    I know you say you can work harder but my gut feeling would be that if you were to do it in a year it would adversely affect your other subjects. Have you ever applied 56 hour principal to your week? This should tell you if you have the time. If you need me to explain this I can.

    If you do not have the time I am not going to advise you forget doing AS Maths but rather do it so that you spend the first half of year 12 revisiting GCSE work and improving your base making transition easier then take 18 months to self teach AS Maths.
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    I did Edexcel A level maths, which you're considering, so I'll tell you how I found it. For context, I got an A* at GCSE in both maths and further maths.

    AS level maths was fine. C1 was only a bit harder than further maths GCSE, and C2 was alright. I liked S1 - lots of people complain about statistics but I enjoyed it. However, I had at that point always found maths very easy and whilst I did plenty of revision and past papers, coming out with an A wasn't a surprise.

    A2 level maths was a different story, C3 was hard but manageable and M1 was easy after AS level physics, but C4 I found really hard. I couldn't understand it despite the help of friends and my teacher. I did come out with an overall A in my maths A level but I got a D in C4 - the As in other modules saved me.

    I think self-teaching maths would be very hard, particularly from a GCSE grade C. At my school, to study maths you need an A in GCSE maths and to have been eligible for the GCSE further maths qualification. There were still quite a few Us in modules on AS results day. Maths is hard, and if you don't understand it or find it hard at GCSE, you'll struggle so much more with the A level.

    However, there's no harm in getting a second hand textbook off Amazon or something very cheaply and having a look and seeing if you think learning that would be manageable. There are tutorials on Youtube and if your friends study maths they'll probably be happy to help. Getting an A level tutor also helps some people a lot.

    By all means try, but be prepared for a lot of very difficult work that will be very time consuming (and may consequently affect your grades in other subjects).
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    (Original post by jasmine_6780)
    Hi , thank you so much for replying.
    I completely understand where you & teachers are coming from.
    It's just that I really enjoy maths and there's so much help out there. E.g I can even get helped at school as one of my teachers have offered to, also loads of people in my family done Maths so hopefully they can run me through it all.
    I will think about it and take your advice.

    What did you find hard about maths ? And if there's more advice you would give me if I took on Maths what would it be ?

    Thanks again!
    I was the exact same as you are. I adored gcse maths and didn't find it too difficult, but A Level is so different.

    I had a lot of help at school. I would go to my teachers during study periods for help, stay after school etc... And that led to a B grade.

    What I found so hard about maths is the fact that most of it is completely new. Not only that, if you go wrong at the beginning of a problem, you lose so many marks, even if the rest of your working is correct! It's so easy to write something down incorrectly and therefore so easy to actually lose marks!

    If you decide to take maths just keep working on it. When you do past paper questions do the ones at the end! I used to start exam papers and do all the easier questions and think I was a pro then I actually started to do the harder ones and struggled. Make sure you practise them ones!


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    If you got a C in GCSE maths then you're gonna have to work really hard to do A level, but it's not impossible. I self-taught A2 maths over the last year and managed to get an A. You will need to learn/revise almost every day
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    (Original post by LeFailFish)
    I did Edexcel A level maths, which you're considering, so I'll tell you how I found it. For context, I got an A* at GCSE in both maths and further maths.

    AS level maths was fine. C1 was only a bit harder than further maths GCSE, and C2 was alright. I liked S1 - lots of people complain about statistics but I enjoyed it. However, I had at that point always found maths very easy and whilst I did plenty of revision and past papers, coming out with an A wasn't a surprise.

    A2 level maths was a different story, C3 was hard but manageable and M1 was easy after AS level physics, but C4 I found really hard. I couldn't understand it despite the help of friends and my teacher. I did come out with an overall A in my maths A level but I got a D in C4 - the As in other modules saved me.

    I think self-teaching maths would be very hard, particularly from a GCSE grade C. At my school, to study maths you need an A in GCSE maths and to have been eligible for the GCSE further maths qualification. There were still quite a few Us in modules on AS results day. Maths is hard, and if you don't understand it or find it hard at GCSE, you'll struggle so much more with the A level.

    However, there's no harm in getting a second hand textbook off Amazon or something very cheaply and having a look and seeing if you think learning that would be manageable. There are tutorials on Youtube and if your friends study maths they'll probably be happy to help. Getting an A level tutor also helps some people a lot.

    By all means try, but be prepared for a lot of very difficult work that will be very time consuming (and may consequently affect your grades in other subjects).
    Just being nosey. How did you do in C3? I like you got a d in C4 and an A overall with the notational A* in C3. By the way I did AQA.
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    (Original post by h3110)
    If you got a C in GCSE maths then you're gonna have to work really hard to do A level, but it's not impossible. I self-taught A2 maths over the last year and managed to get an A. You will need to learn/revise almost every day
    Congrats on your A, very proud of you and this really motivates me EVEN MORE!!! Well seeing you self studied your way through this, what other advice can you give me for AS??? Hopefully if I do well at AS my school can take me on for A2.

    I am definitely willing to study everyday and just really focus.

    Thanks!
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    (Original post by Jitesh)
    I hate to be rude, but a-level maths essentially starts off with the GCSE 'A*' topics and quickly advances to much higher level work

    a lot of people, who get A/A* at GCSE maths even end up with Us and Es! Maths tends to have a high GCSE requirement because statistically people with B or lower are much much more likely to struggle

    But, have a look and see if you can manage Core 1 topics now quite easily; despite being the easiest pure maths module (for most people), and understand it will get harder in Core 2, you might be fine

    Good luck on whatever your decision is
    Yes I completely understand where your coming from.
    For me it's that I easily understand maths, I just didn't work hard at All.

    Thanks for the advice!
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    (Original post by jasmine_6780)
    Congrats on your A, very proud of you and this really motivates me EVEN MORE!!! Well seeing you self studied your way through this, what other advice can you give me for AS??? Hopefully if I do well at AS my school can take me on for A2.

    I am definitely willing to study everyday and just really focus.

    Thanks!
    I suggest self-teaching with Edexcel and just pay to sit the exams.

    All I did for A2 was watch this guys videos ( http://www.examsolutions.net/maths-r...cification.php ) I didn't use any textbooks.

    Basically just watch all the C1, C2, and S1 video tutorials (if you are doing S1??) and makes notes while watching. Then do the past papers on his website, and if you can't do a question watch his video explaining how to do it.
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    (Original post by Midgeymoo17)
    Just being nosey. How did you do in C3? I like you got a d in C4 and an A overall with the notational A* in C3. By the way I did AQA.
    Not as well as I did in C1 and C2, where I got over 90%, but loads better than C4!
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    (Original post by jasmine_6780)
    ...
    Hi Jasmine,

    There is very little chance you would be successful self-teaching A Level maths.

    There are a number of courses designed to allow those with C grades or above at GCSE to progress to mathematics at Level 3. Collectively they are known as Core Maths - your school may offer one of the qualifications.

    Mr M
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    (Original post by Aleveltimes)
    I had a lot of help at school. I would go to my teachers during study periods for help, stay after school etc... And that led to a B grade.

    What I found so hard about maths is the fact that most of it is completely new. Not only that, if you go wrong at the beginning of a problem, you lose so many marks, even if the rest of your working is correct! It's so easy to write something down incorrectly and therefore so easy to actually lose marks!

    If you decide to take maths just keep working on it. When you do past paper questions do the ones at the end! I used to start exam papers and do all the easier questions and think I was a pro then I actually started to do the harder ones and struggled. Make sure you practise them ones!
    A-level mathematics separates those who are passionate, and those who want to do it for the sake of having it.

    When I did mathematics at university in my first year - similar topics to Decision and Stat math with Mathematical Induction, Recurrence and Contradiction, etc - one time I had written 2 times n instead of 2 to the power of n, and that deducted 4 marks. It was unfair since above it I had written 2 power n, then below it I had written it again, forgot to cross it out, and written 2n instead. I would have gotten an A* had I corrected that. The marking in mathematics is very strict, but if you have the time and effort, it can be enjoyable.

    Lesson: I think the best advice here is to ask your teacher the minute you fail to understand a topic. That way, you can understand it much better and tackle more difficult challenges. For example, in my case, induction was essential to learn before recurrence.

    Something I should add: if you are planning on learning a-level mathematics, then you can speak to your math teacher in your school, and learn after school with your teacher, you can refer to this as an "enrichment"; as an afterschool curriculum. Even if there is no exam at the end of it, that way you can meet up and ask any questions, to further your learning; provided your teacher will agree to that.

    You should definitely ask your teacher a bunch of recommended text books for A-level math, then read them. After you learn a topic, do a past paper and assess how well you have learned a particular topic.
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    I got an A* at GCSE, but a B at AS

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    If you wanted to take AS Stats, you would need to complete C1, C2 and S2 as the modules in the Mathematics course.

    Assuming £50 per exam, you are correct that exams would cost you £150.

    A number of our learners who study Mathematics require a lot of tutor support (as maths isn't an easy subject to self study) so I would recommend that you buy a course with dedicated tutor support, or consider finding a local tutor who could help you out if you got stuck.

    Good Luck with your studies.

    M
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    (Original post by LeFailFish)
    I did Edexcel A level maths, which you're considering, so I'll tell you how I found it. For context, I got an A* at GCSE in both maths and further maths.

    AS level maths was fine. C1 was only a bit harder than further maths GCSE, and C2 was alright. I liked S1 - lots of people complain about statistics but I enjoyed it. However, I had at that point always found maths very easy and whilst I did plenty of revision and past papers, coming out with an A wasn't a surprise.

    A2 level maths was a different story, C3 was hard but manageable and M1 was easy after AS level physics, but C4 I found really hard. I couldn't understand it despite the help of friends and my teacher. I did come out with an overall A in my maths A level but I got a D in C4 - the As in other modules saved me.

    I think self-teaching maths would be very hard, particularly from a GCSE grade C. At my school, to study maths you need an A in GCSE maths and to have been eligible for the GCSE further maths qualification. There were still quite a few Us in modules on AS results day. Maths is hard, and if you don't understand it or find it hard at GCSE, you'll struggle so much more with the A level.

    However, there's no harm in getting a second hand textbook off Amazon or something very cheaply and having a look and seeing if you think learning that would be manageable. There are tutorials on Youtube and if your friends study maths they'll probably be happy to help. Getting an A level tutor also helps some people a lot.

    By all means try, but be prepared for a lot of very difficult work that will be very time consuming (and may consequently affect your grades in other subjects).
    Hi, i got an A* at gcse maths and an A in the further maths gcse qualification. Do you think an A in further maths GCSE is eligible enough for me to do A level maths?. One more thing, I am also considering further maths for A level, do you think I'll struggle? Thanks
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    (Original post by Relativity_)
    Hi, i got an A* at gcse maths and an A in the further maths gcse qualification. Do you think an A in further maths GCSE is eligible enough for me to do A level maths?. One more thing, I am also considering further maths for A level, do you think I'll struggle? Thanks
    Yes of course it is! Further maths is obviously hard, and at my school they prefer further maths GCSE A*s for people who want to study further maths A level, but at many other schools they are less strict and people still do very well in further maths A level. So as long as you understand it will be difficult and work hard you should be fine.
 
 
 

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