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    I didn't manage to get B's for my three sciences, and my math (I got c's in my GCSE).
    Regardless, I would like to do the sciences as my A-level (Biology, and chemistry). I am wondering what options do I have, and what colleges there are in Birmingham that I can enroll in to retake my math, or be able to do my sciences with a C.
    If I can retake my sciences, I would like to do also take that option.
    Also if you guys have any suggestions (in terms of options) pleae go ahead, and elaborate. It would meant he world to me.

    Thank you for your time.
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    Anyone ?>
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    my opinion is to not waste your time retaking exams
    those results you have are good and you should be proud of them

    i got a bcc in science and i am hopefully going to be starting my btec medical science level 3 at sixth form ontop of maths and accounting
    the btec medical science only requires 2Cs in science and it can open many doors to nearly all unis (even Cambridge accept it for chemical engineering)
    my ambition to be able to study chemical engineering at loughbrough uni

    so i suggest for you to take the btec medical science/btec applied level 3 science
    and then choose 2 a levels ontop of that
    e.g ICT and economics

    all the best
    and just remember life is a ticking clock
    take whats available before its too late
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    I hope you don't take it the wrong way but I would ask you to reconsider your A-levels in science if you didn't get Bs in those subjects at GCSE unless this was an underperformance due to personal circumstances.

    Sixth forms and colleges don't impose these cut-offs for a laugh; they usually have a lot of experience with people who didn't get the top grades in their subjects at GCSE carrying them onto A-levels and coming out with E/U grades at the end of year 12 and dropping out or retaking the year.

    You should consider your other options, such as apprenticeships and BTECs.
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    The reason I didn't get B's was because 1 month prior to my GCSE's I had moved away from my school, and had to travel 2 hours to get to school. I also didn't revise for the whole of year 11, i revised a few hours before the exam. If I had put in the work I could of gotten atleast a A. I use to get A's and A*'s back in year 10 when I studied for it. It's always been my passion to study medicine, and I rather die than not do what I desired to do. Perhaphs dying for it is a bit of a overstatement; however, it's the only subject that I would love to do.
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    The reason I didn't get B's was because 1 month prior to my GCSE's I had moved away from my school, and had to travel 2 hours to get to school. I also didn't revise for the whole of year 11, i revised a few hours before the exam. If I had put in the work I could of gotten atleast a A. I use to get A's and A*'s back in year 10 when I studied for it. It's always been my passion to study medicine, and I rather die than not do what I desired to do. Perhaphs dying for it is a bit of a overstatement; however, it's the only subject that I would love to do.
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    Hi,
    Sorry to hear about your situation,
    I also travel 2hrs to school - it is a nightmare!
    Does your school have a sixth form? Because if they do and you explain the circumstances I'm sure they'll let you do science.
    In fact explaining it to any sixth form they would understand.
    In regards to the no revision, 2hrs on the bus train whatever is ample time to look through your class work notes and revision books for when you get home you know exactly what you need to do.
    I hope this helps
    Prove to whomever that you can do it - your goal is in reach, you just need a leg up 😉
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    Thank you, for such compasionate words. I will try my best to explain to colleges about my circumstance, and take what ever option I have. I shall begin by enforcing my lazyness to fade.
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    Why are you travelling two hours? Thats not the best schedule for spare time to study. A-levels are tough, I would recommend trying to find a school closer by and then seeing what your options are. Retake if it is necessary, but it may be that the tutors will consider your situation if you explain your circumstances -there will be evidence of your grades up until year 10 showing your ability so they should consider you.

    If medicine is the only thing for you then you must get into the routine of studying hard, it's highly competitive just to get on a course and that is if you achieve the top grades. You will need to look into volunteering and doing work placements in different kinds of healthcare practices as well to show your level of commitment and dedication. It's a tough road but go for it if it's what you want.
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    (Original post by Aghareza)
    The reason I didn't get B's was because 1 month prior to my GCSE's I had moved away from my school, and had to travel 2 hours to get to school. I also didn't revise for the whole of year 11, i revised a few hours before the exam. If I had put in the work I could of gotten atleast a A. I use to get A's and A*'s back in year 10 when I studied for it. It's always been my passion to study medicine, and I rather die than not do what I desired to do. Perhaphs dying for it is a bit of a overstatement; however, it's the only subject that I would love to do.
    One month prior to your GCSE exams isn't really an excuse unfortunately, especially as most of that would be study leave at most schools. If you'd had to travel that much all year round it might have been understandable.

    I'm not looking to be down on you or anything but it sounds like you are making excuses for your grades and not very good ones at that. And if you didn't study for it then it does raise serious questions about how serious you really are about this whole 'I'd rather die than not do what I desired to do.' You would rather die for it but you couldn't study for it?

    Also, when it comes to medical school, it's very competitive so the whole question of 'desire' is off the table. Medical schools often get 10 applicants competing for a single place and it's about them choosing you, rather than the other way around. Why should they pick somebody who claims to be committed but makes excuses like 'I had to travel too much' and 'I got Cs because I didn't study hard enough' over somebody who has the grades and says they're committed? The other person has something to show for it; you don't (yet). You have to put yourself in the admission tutors' collective shoes and then maybe you'd see what I'm trying to say.

    It really is in your best interest not to pursue this route because A-levels are difficult. Very difficult. And somebody who doesn't get the top grade at GCSE is likely to flunk them completely. I'm not saying there aren't cases when somebody got a C at GCSE and came out with an A/A* at A-level but those are the exception, not the rule.

    Regardless, there are other routes into medicine. You could do non-science A-levels and then join one of an increasing number of widening access programmes and foundation year medical programmes which are geared towards people with non-science A-levels. The grade requirements for these are the same as for the regular medicine courses and it's often stipulated that people with science A-levels are ineligible to apply so a full set of humanities is probably to your advantage.

    If that doesn't work, you can get onto a different degree, probably Biomedical Science, and pursue graduate entry into medicine. However, you should use this as a last resort as it will cost you more time, more money, and more hassle/competition than regular medicine.

    Lastly, several medical schools accept Access to Medicine courses but that's really only for mature students I think. It's not specified but you could pursue that if your A-levels don't go as well as you'd like. One obvious medical school to avoid in that event is Cardiff, as they specifically state that they won't consider applicants who've undertaken additional Level 3 qualifications having failed to get the required A-level grades.

    Good luck.
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    (Original post by Hydeman)
    One month prior to your GCSE exams isn't really an excuse unfortunately, especially as most of that would be study leave at most schools. If you'd had to travel that much all year round it might have been understandable.

    I'm not looking to be down on you or anything but it sounds like you are making excuses for your grades and not very good ones at that. And if you didn't study for it then it does raise serious questions about how serious you really are about this whole 'I'd rather die than not do what I desired to do.' You would rather die for it but you couldn't study for it?

    Also, when it comes to medical school, it's very competitive so the whole question of 'desire' is off the table. Medical schools often get 10 applicants competing for a single place and it's about them choosing you, rather than the other way around. Why should they pick somebody who claims to be committed but makes excuses like 'I had to travel too much' and 'I got Cs because I didn't study hard enough' over somebody who has the grades and says they're committed? The other person has something to show for it; you don't (yet). You have to put yourself in the admission tutors' collective shoes and then maybe you'd see what I'm trying to say.

    It really is in your best interest not to pursue this route because A-levels are difficult. Very difficult. And somebody who doesn't get the top grade at GCSE is likely to flunk them completely. I'm not saying there aren't cases when somebody got a C at GCSE and came out with an A/A* at A-level but those are the exception, not the rule.

    Regardless, there are other routes into medicine. You could do non-science A-levels and then join one of an increasing number of widening access programmes and foundation year medical programmes which are geared towards people with non-science A-levels. The grade requirements for these are the same as for the regular medicine courses and it's often stipulated that people with science A-levels are ineligible to apply so a full set of humanities is probably to your advantage.

    If that doesn't work, you can get onto a different degree, probably Biomedical Science, and pursue graduate entry into medicine. However, you should use this as a last resort as it will cost you more time, more money, and more hassle/competition than regular medicine.

    Lastly, several medical schools accept Access to Medicine courses but that's really only for mature students I think. It's not specified but you could pursue that if your A-levels don't go as well as you'd like. One obvious medical school to avoid in that event is Cardiff, as they specifically state that they won't consider applicants who've undertaken additional Level 3 qualifications having failed to get the required A-level grades.

    Good luck.
    Thank you very much, this indebt answer, it has offered me a lot of suggestions.
    I picked A-level Law, Finance, and Philosophy; however, nor me or my family would like to persuade this career.
    I am looking for a way to grab another chance, I don't mind paying any amount either; as long as there is a way for me to prove my self. Do you have any suggestions?
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    (Original post by Aghareza)
    Thank you very much, this indebt answer, it has offered me a lot of suggestions.
    I picked A-level Law, Finance, and Philosophy; however, nor me or my family would like to persuade this career.
    I am looking for a way to grab another chance, I don't mind paying any amount either; as long as there is a way for me to prove my self. Do you have any suggestions?
    Sure, just read my last post. xD

    To be serious, do you enjoy those subjects? Pick subjects that you enjoy and think you can do well in. A-levels are hard no matter which ones you take but taking subjects you enjoy reduce the misery slightly.

    On another note, try not to let your family have too much of an influence here; it's you who's going to have to live with it for the rest of your life and it's you who will have to repay the student loans. So do something that you like.

    With those subjects, here are the options:

    1. Apply for a foundation/pre-clinical course in medicine. A number of universities do these. Have a look here: http://www.medschools.ac.uk/Students...nicalyear.aspx. Pros: No science A-levels needed. Cons: Extra year, might struggle to learn A-level science in one year.

    2. Graduate entry medicine. This involves applying for another degree first and getting at least a 2:1 on it (are you familiar with degree classifications?) and then applying to special graduate entry schemes that most medical schools run. Pros: Can get into medicine with lower A-level grades than normal. Cons: three years added onto your university career, more expensive, uncertain funding in the future, insane competition for places. See http://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/cont...dicine-a-guide.

    3. Apply for something related to your A-level subjects. Law typically has lower grade requirements than medicine at the same universities e.g. Law at Oxford requires AAA at A-level; Medicine at Oxford requires A*AA at A-level. Pros: lower grade requirements. Cons: not what you want to do in the first place.
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    (Original post by Hydeman)
    Sure, just read my last post. xD

    To be serious, do you enjoy those subjects? Pick subjects that you enjoy and think you can do well in. A-levels are hard no matter which ones you take but taking subjects you enjoy reduce the misery slightly.

    On another note, try not to let your family have too much of an influence here; it's you who's going to have to live with it for the rest of your life and it's you who will have to repay the student loans. So do something that you like.

    With those subjects, here are the options:

    1. Apply for a foundation/pre-clinical course in medicine. A number of universities do these. Have a look here: http://www.medschools.ac.uk/Students...nicalyear.aspx. Pros: No science A-levels needed. Cons: Extra year, might struggle to learn A-level science in one year.

    2. Graduate entry medicine. This involves applying for another degree first and getting at least a 2:1 on it (are you familiar with degree classifications?) and then applying to special graduate entry schemes that most medical schools run. Pros: Can get into medicine with lower A-level grades than normal. Cons: three years added onto your university career, more expensive, uncertain funding in the future, insane competition for places. See http://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/cont...dicine-a-guide.

    3. Apply for something related to your A-level subjects. Law typically has lower grade requirements than medicine at the same universities e.g. Law at Oxford requires AAA at A-level; Medicine at Oxford requires A*AA at A-level. Pros: lower grade requirements. Cons: not what you want to do in the first place.
    This is truly opening my a eyes a lot more; I can see a lot more paths, all thanks to you. That said, I still have another remaining question. Is there a way for me to resit my gcse's? I would like to resit my sciences, math, and english, in order to achieve A*'s.
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    (Original post by Aghareza)
    This is truly opening my a eyes a lot more; I can see a lot more paths, all thanks to you. That said, I still have another remaining question. Is there a way for me to resit my gcse's? I would like to resit my sciences, math, and english, in order to achieve A*'s.
    It depends on your school but there are usually resits for maths and English in November although I'm not sure whether these are restricted to people who failed (i.e. got less than a C) on these subjects. Also, I'm not sure what the position of individual medical schools is on GCSE resits. They might see it as trying to cheat the system or something.

    I should tell you now that resitting during your AS year might be risky as the step-up is painful for most people and you don't want it to affect your A-level performance but it's your call.
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    (Original post by Hydeman)
    It depends on your school but there are usually resits for maths and English in November although I'm not sure whether these are restricted to people who failed (i.e. got less than a C) on these subjects. Also, I'm not sure what the position of individual medical schools is on GCSE resits. They might see it as trying to cheat the system or something.

    I should tell you now that resitting during your AS year might be risky as the step-up is painful for most people and you don't want it to affect your A-level performance but it's your call.
    Indeed that is true, it could be a pain, and I've been rejected by colleges about resits; however, this is making me feel as if the door is closing to getting into medicine (not biomedical or stuff around it). Can I even make anything out of A-level Law, philosophy, and finance? Such as Law.
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    (Original post by Aghareza)
    Indeed that is true, it could be a pain, and I've been rejected by colleges about resits; however, this is making me feel as if the door is closing to getting into medicine (not biomedical or stuff around it). Can I even make anything out of A-level Law, philosophy, and finance? Such as Law.
    Yes, if you get the grades for it, you can definitely go into Law. Law is one of those subjects that doesn't normally specify any subjects so you can theoretically get into Law with any subject combination but yours is definitely strong and relevant.

    And the door isn't closing. Just apply to foundation medicine and you'll get in if you have the grades and a strong application overall.
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    (Original post by Hydeman)
    Yes, if you get the grades for it, you can definitely go into Law. Law is one of those subjects that doesn't normally specify any subjects so you can theoretically get into Law with any subject combination but yours is definitely strong and relevant.

    And the door isn't closing. Just apply to foundation medicine and you'll get in if you have the grades and a strong application overall.
    I am truly glad to have your guidance, the whole process would of been such a pain . In that case, If I do a level 3 science, what else should I do on the side? Also C's are terrible for medicine, in terms of competition I will not stand out with gcse, which means I need a alternative to prove my self, any suggestions? ( You're the doctor here, and I am the patient; irony )
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    (Original post by Aghareza)
    I am truly glad to have your guidance, the whole process would of been such a pain . In that case, If I do a level 3 science, what else should I do on the side? Also C's are terrible for medicine, in terms of competition I will not stand out with gcse, which means I need a alternative to prove my self, any suggestions? ( You're the doctor here, and I am the patient; irony )
    Cs aren't necessarily terrible for medicine, especially foundation medicine. As long as you have the minimum grades at GCSE e.g. at least grade B in maths, science and English, your AS grades will matter more to most universities. You might want to consider taking a gap year and applying with achieved A2 grades as that would give the admissions people a lot more certainty and would strengthen your application.

    To stand out, it's usually best if you get lots of relevant work experience, voluntary work and read around your subject and try to get this across in your personal statement. The admissions people want to see people who can show their interest. I don't know if you have to do the UKCAT for foundation medicine courses but a strong performance on that might help you stand out too. You have a lot of time to go. I'm applying this year with achieved A2 grades and quite scared to be honest. xD

    Also, what do you mean by a Level 3 science? An A-level in a science subject?
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    (Original post by Hydeman)
    Cs aren't necessarily terrible for medicine, especially foundation medicine. As long as you have the minimum grades at GCSE e.g. at least grade B in maths, science and English, your AS grades will matter more to most universities. You might want to consider taking a gap year and applying with achieved A2 grades as that would give the admissions people a lot more certainty and would strengthen your application.

    To stand out, it's usually best if you get lots of relevant work experience, voluntary work and read around your subject and try to get this across in your personal statement. The admissions people want to see people who can show their interest. I don't know if you have to do the UKCAT for foundation medicine courses but a strong performance on that might help you stand out too. You have a lot of time to go. I'm applying this year with achieved A2 grades and quite scared to be honest. xD

    Also, what do you mean by a Level 3 science? An A-level in a science subject?
    Best of luck, who ever you are. I hope you do get in.
    Yes, it's an equilevant to a A-level. A mixture of all three sciences.
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    (Original post by Aghareza)
    Best of luck, who ever you are. I hope you do get in.
    Yes, it's an equilevant to a A-level. A mixture of all three sciences.
    Hmm. If you do do that, you won't be eligible for most foundation courses as they're aimed at people with non-science A-levels but it's your call.

    And thanks.
 
 
 
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