rayytbh
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So basically i have never thought that i was good at english. I used to always do great in exams and coursework in english lit gcse but i used to never have amazing analysis or anything, i used to just record good points made in class and include them in my essay.

When i chose my a level options i though no way am i doing english so instead im doing maths biology chemistry and psychology but ive never done psychology and it does seem very boring to me. I know that im not going to enjoy it especily when looking at the syllabus and on top of that i feel like its too much science.
I got my english lit gcse results and i got surprisingly an a* and now i realise that i actually love english lessons. I love reading i love english lessons but im just scared tbat the exams r going to be so harf.

Shall i take english lit for a level instead of psychology? How difficult is it?
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Windies
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English Lit is a weird subject.

Enjoyable to explore old and contemporary poetry and prose.

But when it comes to the exams, if you want an A grade there is no room for creativity in writing, you have to write in a robotic structured manner to score good marks...

Coursework component of the course is enjoyable as you can really be creative and adventurous with your writing with the only boundaries being word-caps.

If you enjoy Literature then certainly go for it, no point doing Psychology if you won't enjoy it especially considering you have to learn countless theories/studies/cases/arguments.
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giella
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(Original post by Windies)
English Lit is a weird subject.

Enjoyable to explore old and contemporary poetry and prose.

But when it comes to the exams, if you want an A grade there is no room for creativity in writing, you have to write in a robotic structured manner to score good marks...

Coursework component of the course is enjoyable as you can really be creative and adventurous with your writing with the only boundaries being word-caps.

If you enjoy Literature then certainly go for it, no point doing Psychology if you won't enjoy it especially considering you have to learn countless theories/studies/cases/arguments.
That's not true about English Literature. A good English teacher would show you how to write. Creative thinking is essential for interpreting the questions at A level. You need to be able to write in a structured manner and to support your arguments with evidence in order to write convincingly. That doesn't mean robotic. There is a lot of room to develop your skills if you give yourself the space and appreciate what is being asked of you.

Psychology is interesting but the A level is quite superficial in terms of the level of detail you go into, but not superficial enough that it won't end up eating into all of your time when it comes to revision, unless you stay on top of it. Doing sciences will help, however, and if you've got good maths skills and an objective mind, you won't find it difficult.

They're both good choices, and both give you the chance to look at something new or something old in more depth at least.

I've got a graduate qualification in Psychology and I would still pick English Literature. I'd say my English Literature A level has been the most valuable A level I took and the one I remember the most.
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rayytbh
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Thank you so much. Ive checked the english lit spec i would be doing and i loved it
We would study books such as a thousand splendid suns which i loved and is one of my favourite books ever. I feel like i do tend to just write down points made in class and just use those in my essays bc i do feel like i struggle to think of intelligent and clever interpretations and points and thats why im hesitant on picking english lit.
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rayytbh
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(Original post by giella)
That's not true about English Literature. A good English teacher would show you how to write. Creative thinking is essential for interpreting the questions at A level. You need to be able to write in a structured manner and to support your arguments with evidence in order to write convincingly. That doesn't mean robotic. There is a lot of room to develop your skills if you give yourself the space and appreciate what is being asked of you.

Psychology is interesting but the A level is quite superficial in terms of the level of detail you go into, but not superficial enough that it won't end up eating into all of your time when it comes to revision, unless you stay on top of it. Doing sciences will help, however, and if you've got good maths skills and an objective mind, you won't find it difficult.

They're both good choices, and both give you the chance to look at something new or something old in more depth at least.

I've got a graduate qualification in Psychology and I would still pick English Literature. I'd say my English Literature A level has been the most valuable A level I took and the one I remember the most.
Uve convinced me to take english lit haha x
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Quaggie
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(Original post by Windies)
English Lit is a weird subject.

Enjoyable to explore old and contemporary poetry and prose.

But when it comes to the exams, if you want an A grade there is no room for creativity in writing, you have to write in a robotic structured manner to score good marks...

Coursework component of the course is enjoyable as you can really be creative and adventurous with your writing with the only boundaries being word-caps.

If you enjoy Literature then certainly go for it, no point doing Psychology if you won't enjoy it especially considering you have to learn countless theories/studies/cases/arguments.
Absolutely this.

Well on point!


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(Original post by giella)
That's not true about English Literature. A good English teacher would show you how to write. Creative thinking is essential for interpreting the questions at A level. You need to be able to write in a structured manner and to support your arguments with evidence in order to write convincingly. That doesn't mean robotic. There is a lot of room to develop your skills if you give yourself the space and appreciate what is being asked of you.

Psychology is interesting but the A level is quite superficial in terms of the level of detail you go into, but not superficial enough that it won't end up eating into all of your time when it comes to revision, unless you stay on top of it. Doing sciences will help, however, and if you've got good maths skills and an objective mind, you won't find it difficult.

They're both good choices, and both give you the chance to look at something new or something old in more depth at least.

I've got a graduate qualification in Psychology and I would still pick English Literature. I'd say my English Literature A level has been the most valuable A level I took and the one I remember the most.
Im am to stuck on what to take for my alevels and debating on what I should take. I you don't mind me asking how has English lit benefited you.
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giella
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English Literature, taught well, is one of the few subjects you will use forever. It teaches you how to read, how to unlock layers of meaning from wonderful literature that you could never have otherwise accessed. It will affect every book that you ever read and you will never stop learning those lessons. I like to think of my English teachers of having given me an amazing gift in that respect.

I've made a career in tutoring and writing and English Literature guides have been some of my favourite projects to write. I'm currently writing a book on the poetry of Wilfred Owen and, whilst it may never make a huge amount of money, has been one of the most amazing journeys for me. I feel privileged to be able to meet this amazing mind through his words, despite his life being cut hideously short.

It's a privilege to be able to study English literature, especially if your teachers are good. That's all I can really say on the subject. The practical benefits can also be quantified in terms of the practical skills it can teach you as well, essay writing etc. but I don't see that as the main benefit.
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brit1961
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English writing skill will be benefited if you need to publish a book or you are willing to be a poet .. lol
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Changing Skies
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I absolutely loved English Literature and would definitely recommend it! You do have to stick to a certain structure in the exam, but that doesn't mean you can't show off your creativity and interesting interpretations. The way people can interpret texts so differently is what really makes it interesting.

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rayytbh
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(Original post by brit1961)
English writing skill will be benefited if you need to publish a book or you are willing to be a poet .. lol
I completely disagree. U dont just write when writing a novel. The amount of essays and things u will write from letters and emails to personal statements and essays for other subjects english will help u improve ur writing in all of those and more
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Frankly, English Literature is a subject that you can't easily get A or failed.
If you enjoy to learn and immerse to the contemporary and historical texts, feel free to take it
From what I have learnt so far, English Literature is a combination of other subjects, it includes history, english language, critical thinking and perhaps to a certain extent of sociology.
If you take it as a forth subject or you do love it, please take it, you will never regret.
It really practices your critical thinking skill and the way you write. It benefits a lot for your future.
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(Original post by giella)
English Literature, taught well, is one of the few subjects you will use forever. It teaches you how to read, how to unlock layers of meaning from wonderful literature that you could never have otherwise accessed. It will affect every book that you ever read and you will never stop learning those lessons. I like to think of my English teachers of having given me an amazing gift in that respect.

I've made a career in tutoring and writing and English Literature guides have been some of my favourite projects to write. I'm currently writing a book on the poetry of Wilfred Owen and, whilst it may never make a huge amount of money, has been one of the most amazing journeys for me. I feel privileged to be able to meet this amazing mind through his words, despite his life being cut hideously short.

It's a privilege to be able to study English literature, especially if your teachers are good. That's all I can really say on the subject. The practical benefits can also be quantified in terms of the practical skills it can teach you as well, essay writing etc. but I don't see that as the main benefit.
I agree with Giella here. This is a subject definitely worth taking -- and not just for career or instrumental reasons mind you: it doesn't have to be practical to be valuable. And a good teacher will make all the difference, as with any course at school or university. Especially at uni. where you have choice. In fact, make a point of choosing your courses (in English, for instance) according to teacher, not just topic or subject. I learnt this through experience.
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The Empire Odyssey
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(Original post by giella)
That's not true about English Literature. A good English teacher would show you how to write. Creative thinking is essential for interpreting the questions at A level. You need to be able to write in a structured manner and to support your arguments with evidence in order to write convincingly. That doesn't mean robotic. There is a lot of room to develop your skills if you give yourself the space and appreciate what is being asked of you.

Psychology is interesting but the A level is quite superficial in terms of the level of detail you go into, but not superficial enough that it won't end up eating into all of your time when it comes to revision, unless you stay on top of it. Doing sciences will help, however, and if you've got good maths skills and an objective mind, you won't find it difficult.

They're both good choices, and both give you the chance to look at something new or something old in more depth at least.

I've got a graduate qualification in Psychology and I would still pick English Literature. I'd say my English Literature A level has been the most valuable A level I took and the one I remember the most.
I disagree with you to an extent and I'll tell you why.

Creative thinking is definitely helpful in terms of interpreting the text how you wish. But A-level limits this, especially the exam because A-level is all about jumping through hoops in order to fit into a certain criteria in order to hit the marks to get the right grade. This formulaic way of making sure you are writing in order to tick off the right assessment objectives is very robotic. This limits you on what to say and how to say it. Of course there's a structured way and logical way for writing Literature essays. However, A-level has you jumping through hoops in order to write this way, thus limiting your creative response.

The skills you speak of is the way you analyse, look, read and interpret the text. Has nothing to do with how you write, because there is a systematic way on how to write a good A-level essay because you are being marked on hitting the assessment objectives.

No I simply compare my conclusion with that of English at degree level where that is open to whatever you wish. You have way more free choice, there's no assessment objectives, you're not placed in a band to decided what grade you get. You are marked on how well you can interpret what's being asked of you and not solely how you write, but what you write too.

I definitely agree with how A-level lit does hinder your creative response - you've just got to simply cater to the marker's will in order to get the grades. I've worked as an exam marker, a tutor and I was an ex student too so I think in my experience counteracts your opinion, although it doesn't disregard your opinion altogether.
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giella
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(Original post by The Empire Odyssey)
I disagree with you to an extent and I'll tell you why.

Creative thinking is definitely helpful in terms of interpreting the text how you wish. But A-level limits this, especially the exam because A-level is all about jumping through hoops in order to fit into a certain criteria in order to hit the marks to get the right grade. This formulaic way of making sure you are writing in order to tick off the right assessment objectives is very robotic. This limits you on what to say and how to say it. Of course there's a structured way and logical way for writing Literature essays. However, A-level has you jumping through hoops in order to write this way, thus limiting your creative response.

The skills you speak of is the way you analyse, look, read and interpret the text. Has nothing to do with how you write, because there is a systematic way on how to write a good A-level essay because you are being marked on hitting the assessment objectives.

No I simply compare my conclusion with that of English at degree level where that is open to whatever you wish. You have way more free choice, there's no assessment objectives, you're not placed in a band to decided what grade you get. You are marked on how well you can interpret what's being asked of you and not solely how you write, but what you write too.

I definitely agree with how A-level lit does hinder your creative response - you've just got to simply cater to the marker's will in order to get the grades. I've worked as an exam marker, a tutor and I was an ex student too so I think in my experience counteracts your opinion, although it doesn't disregard your opinion altogether.
Given that I have identical experience to yours I fail to see how that counteracts my opinion. I've marked, tutored and studied it so...hm. I've even written a book on the subject so I could trump you there, too. Would you be happy to let your argument stand as an example of why we don't base our arguments on assumptions?

I would also say that, taught well, as my students tend to be, you can write in a creative way that hits the assessment objectives by barely trying.
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The Empire Odyssey
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(Original post by giella)
Given that I have identical experience to yours I fail to see how that counteracts my opinion. I've marked, tutored and studied it so...hm. I've even written a book on the subject so I could trump you there, too. Would you be happy to let your argument stand as an example of why we don't base our arguments on assumptions?

I would also say that, taught well, as my students tend to be, you can write in a creative way that hits the assessment objectives by barely trying.
Just because you've apparently written a book on the matter doesn't make you superior to me in any way shape or form.

I'm not arguing with you; I'm just stating my opinion.

You can write creatively, but you can't write in a creative way - it doesn't work like that. At least not for AQA. "barely trying" - yeah that's what a good teacher would say(!)
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giella
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(Original post by The Empire Odyssey)
Just because you've apparently written a book on the matter doesn't make you superior to me in any way shape or form.

I'm not arguing with you; I'm just stating my opinion.

You can write creatively, but you can't write in a creative way - it doesn't work like that. At least not for AQA. "barely trying" - yeah that's what a good teacher would say(!)
Well you did say your experience counteracts my opinion...

Does your experience trump mine? Does your opinion trump mine?

And just so you know, I teach all exam boards for English. If you're teaching it right and encouraging students to develop their skills on a regular basis, creative thinking and good essay writing will go hand in hand. Yes, the timing is tight but that's the case in any exam. If they're skilled and experienced essay writers, however, that won't be an impediment.

There's a difference between writing efficiently and in a structured fashion and writing robotically and rigidly. A good teacher knows the difference and can teach it.
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The Empire Odyssey
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(Original post by giella)
Well you did say your experience counteracts my opinion...

Does your experience trump mine? Does your opinion trump mine?

And just so you know, I teach all exam boards for English. If you're teaching it right and encouraging students to develop their skills on a regular basis, creative thinking and good essay writing will go hand in hand. Yes, the timing is tight but that's the case in any exam. If they're skilled and experienced essay writers, however, that won't be an impediment.

There's a difference between writing efficiently and in a structured fashion and writing robotically and rigidly. A good teacher knows the difference and can teach it.
No I just said my opinion goes against yours...

No it doesn't - just makes me have a different light to your comment. It was my opinion. You acted as if your statement were mere fact.

You can't "teach" all exam boards. You must be a tutor - and a tutor is very different to being a teacher.

But you're not a teacher. "can teach it" - yeah you just contradicted yourself by saying "a good teacher.. can teach it".. Any teacher or any English teacher would know you can teach English - English as a subject is developmental - you develop skill, not teach or create it. It's all about developing what they know and bring it to the next stage. To "teach" how to write just proves my point that it's a systematic and robotic approach to English.

But that's my opinion and I have no patience for your ego and if you can't appreciate my opinion, then you should find a different job sweetheart. Goodbye.
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giella
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(Original post by The Empire Odyssey)
No I just said my opinion goes against yours...

No it doesn't - just makes me have a different light to your comment. It was my opinion. You acted as if your statement were mere fact.

You can't "teach" all exam boards. You must be a tutor - and a tutor is very different to being a teacher.

But you're not a teacher. "can teach it" - yeah you just contradicted yourself by saying "a good teacher.. can teach it".. Any teacher or any English teacher would know you can teach English - English as a subject is developmental - you develop skill, not teach or create it. It's all about developing what they know and bring it to the next stage. To "teach" how to write just proves my point that it's a systematic and robotic approach to English.

But that's my opinion and I have no patience for your ego and if you can't appreciate my opinion, then you should find a different job sweetheart. Goodbye.
I think the biggest ego here is yours.
You're the one who made this personal. You're the one who said that your experience counteracts my opinion without even stopping to think that I might actually have experience of my own. You also seemed to take offence at the idea that I've published and defend yourself from a non-existent assertion that I am a superior person. All I was doing was stating my experience for the record, as you made an incorrect assumption that I somehow lacked it and was making an assertion based only on opinion, brandishing your experience to "counteract" it.

You're getting very flustered for some reason and for no good reason that I can see. You can teach all exam boards. I have taught three different ones in two different schools and I have tutored four. That's just for English. I've also taught for history and psychology as well.

Your comments really are quite inconsistent and seem to be fuelled by emotion. You're lacking objectivity. The idea that you don't believe writing can be taught is frankly bizarre. Any skill can be taught in terms of the fundamentals and then developed through practice. A good teacher can seize opportunities to teach new vocabulary, ways of structuring sentences, and new critical approaches to the source material. Why you believe none of that can be taught is beyond me.
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The Empire Odyssey
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(Original post by giella)
I think the biggest ego here is yours.
You're the one who made this personal. You're the one who said that your experience counteracts my opinion without even stopping to think that I might actually have experience of my own. You also seemed to take offence at the idea that I've published and defend yourself from a non-existent assertion that I am a superior person. All I was doing was stating my experience for the record, as you made an incorrect assumption that I somehow lacked it and was making an assertion based only on opinion, brandishing your experience to "counteract" it.

You're getting very flustered for some reason and for no good reason that I can see. You can teach all exam boards. I have taught three different ones in two different schools and I have tutored four. That's just for English. I've also taught for history and psychology as well.

Your comments really are quite inconsistent and seem to be fuelled by emotion. You're lacking objectivity. The idea that you don't believe writing can be taught is frankly bizarre. Any skill can be taught in terms of the fundamentals and then developed through practice. A good teacher can seize opportunities to teach new vocabulary, ways of structuring sentences, and new critical approaches to the source material. Why you believe none of that can be taught is beyond me.
I won't bother reading your rambling because my ego doesn't have the patience. So take several seats hun cause you are dismissed.
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