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    So I didn't get the grades for Dietetics (at any university) and am now studying BSc Nutrition. I was wondering if it would be possible, upon completion, for me to study Dietetics; will the BSc Nutrition be a heavy enough qualification to grant me access or will I have to go back and resit some qualifications?
    I hope to eventually study at Robert Gordon University but I have recently discovered that they do not accept Access course as a valid qualification - due to it not being intense enough. I am very arbitrary about studying Dietetics, so I can only see two options: Spend two years doing my A levels and then reapply at Robert gordon or do three years on a BSc Nutrition course..

    Now.. I know that it would be faster for me to do the A levels, but I am already 20 years old and feel as though going back to college with younger students would deter me greatly and even though the BSc degree is three years.. I would enjoy it greatly because it is about nutrition which is something I strongly enjoy studying, and I would get a BSc from it!

    Anyway.. Do you believe uni's would prefer my to go back to do A levels or the BSc in Nutrition?

    Edit: I have got Qualifications in science. I have done an access to science course where I achieved mostly merits and some Distinctions but fell short of what is required to study Dietetics.

    Many Thanks!
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    (Original post by OliverHartless)
    So I didn't get the grades for Dietetics (at any university) and am now studying BSc Nutrition. I was wondering if it would be possible, upon completion, for me to study Dietetics; will the BSc Nutrition be a heavy enough qualification to grant me access or will I have to go back and resit some qualifications?
    I hope to eventually study at Robert Gordon University but I have recently discovered that they do not accept Access course as a valid qualification - due to it not being intense enough. I am very arbitrary about studying Dietetics, so I can only see two options: Spend two years doing my A levels and then reapply at Robert gordon or do three years on a BSc Nutrition course..

    Now.. I know that it would be faster for me to do the A levels, but I am already 20 years old and feel as though going back to college with younger students would deter me greatly and even though the BSc degree is three years.. I would enjoy it greatly because it is about nutrition which is something I strongly enjoy studying, and I would get a BSc from it!

    Anyway.. Do you believe uni's would prefer my to go back to do A levels or the BSc in Nutrition?

    Edit: I have got Qualifications in science. I have done an access to science course where I achieved mostly merits and some Distinctions but fell short of what is required to study Dietetics.

    Many Thanks!
    I have asked a dietics grad I work with on occasion (she nhs) and she believes it is a known career progression route, work in Nutrition after study then take post grad level dietics, seems to be her opinion on my situation anyway.
    There is an article some where on the bda site about nutrition to dietics transfer although more for those working in Nutrition hoping to move to dietics. (Also some useful infomation on the association for nutrition site about how to further a career from having a nutrition bsc)
    I'm not sure about Robert Gordon though as I had to pester them just to find anyone to ask about access courses.

    What level are you looking to study dietics? I beleive Plymouth except their students for both nutrition bsc and dietics bsc if your willing to take a foundation year.

    Can I be cheeky and a little off subject to ask how hard you found it to get a nutrition place with an access to he? I'm doing mine this year and looking at dietics preferably or possibly nutrition. Very curious to how hard it is/competition for places.
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    (Original post by barbie2brains)
    I have asked a dietics grad I work with on occasion (she nhs) and she believes it is a known career progression route, work in Nutrition after study then take post grad level dietics, seems to be her opinion on my situation anyway.
    There is an article some where on the bda site about nutrition to dietics transfer although more for those working in Nutrition hoping to move to dietics. (Also some useful infomation on the association for nutrition site about how to further a career from having a nutrition bsc)
    I'm not sure about Robert Gordon though as I had to pester them just to find anyone to ask about access courses.

    What level are you looking to study dietics? I beleive Plymouth except their students for both nutrition bsc and dietics bsc if your willing to take a foundation year.

    Can I be cheeky and a little off subject to ask how hard you found it to get a nutrition place with an access to he? I'm doing mine this year and looking at dietics preferably or possibly nutrition. Very curious to how hard it is/competition for places.
    Hi Barbie

    Thanks for the reply! it is great to actually be able to talk to somebody about this situation. I hope to eventually become a Dietitian and if that is by doing a Masters or a Bsc is not too important too me as long as the end game is the same. I unfortuantly did not get the grades to get into university on a Dietetics course so am now doing a Nutrition BSc in hope that later on I can move over to Dietetics but have found a lot of ambiguity around this being possible. I have been told that I can do a Masters in Dietetics with a BSc Nutrition but it is incredibley hard and I may need to have a couple of years experience which for me isn't really an option because I want to become a Registered Dietitian as soon as possible, so my other option would be to do a BSc in Dietetics after my BSc in Nutrition (in the hope that they would accept that qualification instead of the A level results and what not. This is also incredibly irritating because the NHS does not offer financial support for Nutrition course's as they do for Dietetics courses , so I will be in debt due to me achieving lower grades; I will have also spent 7 years to achieve something that most could achieve in just 3 - 4 years.

    As far as the Access course goes, the idea of the course is great - to be able to achieve the equivalent of A levels in just one year is truly amazing. But, I did have a painful time with my course and it turns out that many other students doing access courses had the same experience. The course was terribly disorganised with uncertainty on what subjects we could study and if that would be congruent with what our individual universities required. The course was rushed to the extent where we completed a whole unit, from start to finish of exam, in two weeks. There was a point when we had a chemistry exam on a unit we had never studied and a lot of time was wasted on sorting out that adversity. Other students I spoke to on interviews from access courses said that they had similar issues.. But all in all.. if you can survive the terrible adversities the course can go through, you will end up with a Qualification that will get you into university... or will it..

    A lot of universities say they accept the Qualification (even though the required results are as high as they can be; achieve everything at Distinction for Dietetics) but when I called up universities some said they wouldn't accept a Access qualification because they don't believe it to be intense enough (Robert Gordon) and others just rejected it straight away..
    But with all that being said.. A girl on my course achieved all Distinctions and managed to get into one of the best universities in the UK for Dietetics.

    TL;DR - Overall an Access course is a pain in the ass and you will have to be super organised to overcome the endless adversities but if you can come out of the course with the top grades, your chances of getting into a university for Dietetics is high.

    Side Note: I achieved All Distinctions with 9 Credits at Merit and got rejected by most universites for Dietetics so I guess, there is more to the application that just your grades.
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    Hi all,

    It is really interesting to read your thread regarding Access Courses, Nutrition and Dietetics. I am a mature student and have been looking into the best way I can position myself to get onto a Dietetics degree in 2017.

    Re converting to Dietetics
    I have looked at unis who offer Nutrition degrees and they have said have had their students graduate their BSc in Nutrition and go on to do a Masters in Dietetics. This qualifies you as a Dietician.

    Re Access course
    This worries me that you were rejected for Dietetics when you did well on the Access course. Did you have extra curricular intrests or volunteering experience that shows your commitment to Dietetics?

    I want to go to Kings as it is the best but am finding it challenging to know the best route - wether it is A Levels or and Access course.

    You mentioned your friend got into the best uni with an Access course - can I ask which Uni she/he got into?
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    (Original post by OliverHartless)
    So I didn't get the grades for Dietetics (at any university) and am now studying BSc Nutrition. I was wondering if it would be possible, upon completion, for me to study Dietetics; will the BSc Nutrition be a heavy enough qualification to grant me access or will I have to go back and resit some qualifications?
    I hope to eventually study at Robert Gordon University but I have recently discovered that they do not accept Access course as a valid qualification - due to it not being intense enough. I am very arbitrary about studying Dietetics, so I can only see two options: Spend two years doing my A levels and then reapply at Robert gordon or do three years on a BSc Nutrition course..

    Now.. I know that it would be faster for me to do the A levels, but I am already 20 years old and feel as though going back to college with younger students would deter me greatly and even though the BSc degree is three years.. I would enjoy it greatly because it is about nutrition which is something I strongly enjoy studying, and I would get a BSc from it!

    Anyway.. Do you believe uni's would prefer my to go back to do A levels or the BSc in Nutrition?

    Edit: I have got Qualifications in science. I have done an access to science course where I achieved mostly merits and some Distinctions but fell short of what is required to study Dietetics.

    Many Thanks!
    hello, this is just me being totally nosey, but I feel like you were in a very similar situation to the one I am in currently, I am 19 and studying an access to science course as I didn't get the a levels for dietetics, I wanted to know did you get interviews for dietetics and if so what were your subsequent offers? also where did you apply, did you apply for all dietetics courses? also where did you do your access course? thanks sorry for the massive list of questions
 
 
 
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