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how to learn french by myself watch

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    learnt it during highschool (got an A in gcse) but if i went to france i wouldn't be able to speak it. I really want to be a fluent speaker so how do i go about doing that?

    also, how hard will german be? im going to start learning that too^_^
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    Can't speak for specific resources on French but I can give you a guideline! I did GCSE German (got a B), carried it on to A Level (got a B) and I'm debating whether or not to take a module in it at uni.

    Since it's easy to do well at GCSE without actually knowing much of a language at all, I suggest downloading an app called Duolingo which you can use to brush up on your GCSE knowledge. It's an app that helps you learn languages, so you'll find courses on there for many different languages, including languages with different scripts such as Ukrainian and conlangs such as Esperanto. As amazing as the app is, it's also quite rubbish - if it's the only resource you use to help you learn a language (and the same goes for any other resource) you will not learn anything. Anyway, I'm rambling, download Duolingo.

    Once you've used Duolingo for a few days to brush up on what you already know, I'd suggest downloading an app called Quizlet (or visiting the website on a PC). Quizlet allows you to make lists of words and test yourself on them, which is super useful for learning vocab! If you're lazy like me, you can usually find millions of pre-made lists by other people for your target language.

    Babadum is another website that is useful to help learn vocab, just click on the picture that matches the word! If that's not your thing, you could try Memrise - it's basically a mixture of Duolingo and Quizlet.

    If you see anything that you want to translate, do it word by word using Linguee - it's so much better than using Google Translate... Nothing will ever be perfect if you translate full sentences. I'd only ever recommend using Google Translate if you are faced with a large chunk of text and you only want to get the jist of it, but even then you could miss out on crucial details. If there's anything you translate, make a note of it and put it on Quizlet.

    It might be worth looking in your local library or online for some self-study guides and/or grammar drill books that you can go through to compliment your vocabulary learning.

    The most important part is practicing your speaking, and the best way to do it is networking with native speakers. HelloTalk is the best way to do this. It's also probably worth looking on Reddit (/r/leanguagelearning is a good start) to find extra resources as well as native speakers who may be willing to practice with you!

    Well... That was a lot longer than I expected. Just remember not to bother with anything like Rosetta Stone - you can find everything you will ever need online for free, especially with a large, popular MFL such as French. As long as you put in the effort you will start to see the rewards!


    As for the difficulty of German... I don't really know, it's subjective. Personally I found German easy to begin with since it just 'clicked' for me, the vocab and syntax/grammar is almost identical in very simple phrases. Compare "She is seven years old" with "Sie ist sieben Jahre alt". However there are some parts of the grammar which are difficult imo. For example it took me 3 years to get my head around the case system (since we don't have one in English and to my knowledge there isn't one in French either) although one day it just suddenly clicked.
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    (Original post by pizzanomics)
    Can't speak for specific resources on French but I can give you a guideline! I did GCSE German (got a B), carried it on to A Level (got a B) and I'm debating whether or not to take a module in it at uni.

    Since it's easy to do well at GCSE without actually knowing much of a language at all, I suggest downloading an app called Duolingo which you can use to brush up on your GCSE knowledge. It's an app that helps you learn languages, so you'll find courses on there for many different languages, including languages with different scripts such as Ukrainian and conlangs such as Esperanto. As amazing as the app is, it's also quite rubbish - if it's the only resource you use to help you learn a language (and the same goes for any other resource) you will not learn anything. Anyway, I'm rambling, download Duolingo.

    Once you've used Duolingo for a few days to brush up on what you already know, I'd suggest downloading an app called Quizlet (or visiting the website on a PC). Quizlet allows you to make lists of words and test yourself on them, which is super useful for learning vocab! If you're lazy like me, you can usually find millions of pre-made lists by other people for your target language.

    Babadum is another website that is useful to help learn vocab, just click on the picture that matches the word! If that's not your thing, you could try Memrise - it's basically a mixture of Duolingo and Quizlet.

    If you see anything that you want to translate, do it word by word using Linguee - it's so much better than using Google Translate... Nothing will ever be perfect if you translate full sentences. I'd only ever recommend using Google Translate if you are faced with a large chunk of text and you only want to get the jist of it, but even then you could miss out on crucial details. If there's anything you translate, make a note of it and put it on Quizlet.

    It might be worth looking in your local library or online for some self-study guides and/or grammar drill books that you can go through to compliment your vocabulary learning.

    The most important part is practicing your speaking, and the best way to do it is networking with native speakers. HelloTalk is the best way to do this. It's also probably worth looking on Reddit (/r/leanguagelearning is a good start) to find extra resources as well as native speakers who may be willing to practice with you!

    Well... That was a lot longer than I expected. Just remember not to bother with anything like Rosetta Stone - you can find everything you will ever need online for free, especially with a large, popular MFL such as French. As long as you put in the effort you will start to see the rewards!


    As for the difficulty of German... I don't really know, it's subjective. Personally I found German easy to begin with since it just 'clicked' for me, the vocab and syntax/grammar is almost identical in very simple phrases. Compare "She is seven years old" with "Sie ist sieben Jahre alt". However there are some parts of the grammar which are difficult imo. For example it took me 3 years to get my head around the case system (since we don't have one in English and to my knowledge there isn't one in French either) although one day it just suddenly clicked.
    omg thankyou so much!!! thats the most brilliant answer since you covered everything:-) i'll do all that thanks again^_^
 
 
 
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