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    Hello all,

    I have currently finished my GCSEs and I am now at that stage where I'm close to starting college. I need to confirm with them my finalised A Levels. But I have heard from numerous of people that A Level work load is double that of GCSE (which I found incredibly burdensome) so I have decided to opt into 3 A Levels -I have no desires to do 4.

    I am interested in English Literature, Psychology and Sociology. In my GCSEs I managed to bank my 5 English course work (a mixture of Lanaguge and Lit) grades at 3 A*'s an A and a B. At the end of my GCSE exam I came out with A's in both Lang and Lit. Though I'm not wanting to come across like I'm blowing my own trumpet, I feel like I have a certain 'gift' if you like in English it's always been my strongest subject. This makes me feel like I would be able to succeed in A Levels. But many people have stated (which I believe is true) that the GCSE English Literature is nothing on par with that of the A Level. I liked using the PEEL techniques but many sources claim that everything you've learnt analytically wise you need to forget and revamp it a lot. I also love writing essays and digging my teeth into pieces of texts that I can really go to town with. Can anyone who has done or is still studying English Literature give me some feedback that I haven't already been fronted with. I have googled a lot but have never found the answers I am looking for.

    >What techniques do you use?
    >Is it the same as GCSE where you're given a text and a question IE- "how does the writer evoke the feeling of anger in this play"
    >Is the coursework heavily based and tips on how to get the highest grade

    Also can anyone who has taken either sociology psychology or both also give me feedback on those?

    Sorry in advance if I rambled a lot- I'm new to this site and didn't know what to write, I didn't want to be vague and leave those answering my question confused on what I was asking lol!

    Finally, I have also decided to buy 3 plain lined paper books to allocate each of my chosen subjects to keep my notes seperate. I plan to take notes for all subjects as much as I can in each lesson, go home and revise what I learnt that day for the duration of the course. Does this sound too excessive?

    Thank you so much for those who managed to get through my rambling and giving me some feedback!
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    Depends on exam boards, but for OCR a huge amount of the marks are gained for backing up your argument with context to the book's writing and critical opinions of the text. Coursework wise, I would really look at what Assessment Objectives (AO1-4) are being tested, so you know how many marks you can get for context, language analysis etc. per essay. Also, you really do wanna do well on coursework if you do get OCR, seeing as the boundaries are 90% for an A for both coursework and exam, so it's really useful to gain as many marks as possible early on.
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    (Original post by newman16innit)
    Hello all,

    I have currently finished my GCSEs and I am now at that stage where I'm close to starting college. I need to confirm with them my finalised A Levels. But I have heard from numerous of people that A Level work load is double that of GCSE (which I found incredibly burdensome) so I have decided to opt into 3 A Levels -I have no desires to do 4.

    I am interested in English Literature, Psychology and Sociology. In my GCSEs I managed to bank my 5 English course work (a mixture of Lanaguge and Lit) grades at 3 A*'s an A and a B. At the end of my GCSE exam I came out with A's in both Lang and Lit. Though I'm not wanting to come across like I'm blowing my own trumpet, I feel like I have a certain 'gift' if you like in English it's always been my strongest subject. This makes me feel like I would be able to succeed in A Levels. But many people have stated (which I believe is true) that the GCSE English Literature is nothing on par with that of the A Level. I liked using the PEEL techniques but many sources claim that everything you've learnt analytically wise you need to forget and revamp it a lot. I also love writing essays and digging my teeth into pieces of texts that I can really go to town with. Can anyone who has done or is still studying English Literature give me some feedback that I haven't already been fronted with. I have googled a lot but have never found the answers I am looking for.

    >What techniques do you use?
    >Is it the same as GCSE where you're given a text and a question IE- "how does the writer evoke the feeling of anger in this play"
    >Is the coursework heavily based and tips on how to get the highest grade

    Also can anyone who has taken either sociology psychology or both also give me feedback on those?

    Sorry in advance if I rambled a lot- I'm new to this site and didn't know what to write, I didn't want to be vague and leave those answering my question confused on what I was asking lol!

    Finally, I have also decided to buy 3 plain lined paper books to allocate each of my chosen subjects to keep my notes seperate. I plan to take notes for all subjects as much as I can in each lesson, go home and revise what I learnt that day for the duration of the course. Does this sound too excessive?

    Thank you so much for those who managed to get through my rambling and giving me some feedback!
    I can only speak on behalf of psychology personally, but would start by informing you of how many of my friends who thought they were incredible at English failed it last week so I would advise caution.

    Psychology is a hard-work subject but is mostly memory (which you will study and therefore have an advantage at). If you have a bad memory or can't write essays, don't do psychology. If you aren't interested in psychology don't do it because you will get bored. However, if you fulfill these criteria it is a fun and interesting subject.

    In regards to your revision method, I would advise taking notes in class and condensing them to the bare minimum for revision. you will be given more information than you need and you should try and cut it down to what you can remember. Choose only case studies with memorable names etc. to make you life much easier when revising.
 
 
 

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