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Should schools fund those who fail their maths and english GCSEs? watch

  • View Poll Results: Should schools pay for retakes if their students fail maths or English GCSE?
    Yes they should
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    No they shouldn't
    649
    46.09%

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    Call for school exam failure levy to aid FE colleges

    Schools where pupils fail to get good GCSE grades in English and maths should pay a levy to fund pupils who re-take their exams in further education colleges, says a think tank.
    I think that the school has some responsibility if it can't educate students well enough - I believe that all students of good mental health have the ability to do well if they put the effort in. But this of course means that it's a matter of motivation and this could be the students/parents fault more than the teachers and schools ability to educate.

    What do you think - should schools be funding students who fail?
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    That's absurd. Lazy students would then have a motivation to not revise and fail so they get money. Which is silly.


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    Half and half. The school should subsidize half of the cost because of possible poor teaching methods, but the student should pay the other half, due to maybe just being lazy. I don't think the school should foot the whole bill, as it is not necessarily their fault, and the same applies to students. However, students from disadvantaged backgrounds are more likely to fail, and less able to afford to pay for resits, hence the school should pay half - possibly the full cost in some cases.

    I agree with GuppyFox, anyone can succeed, but some people need more time and help to succeed than others. That doesn't mean they should be sidelined.
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    Certainly not, bar some very specific circumstances. As harsh as it sounds, the matter of the fact is that if you can't pass a basic English or Maths GCSE, you have no hope of passing an A-Level, nor of going into any meaningful higher education. I believe that students should be funded to resit if the rest of their grades are high, and mean that they would be able to do well in other A-Level subjects, because it's only their Maths/English which is holding them back. But, overall, if you can't pass a GCSE- which is a memory test, not an intelligence test- then you have absolutely no chance of going to sixth form or university. You could, of course, go to college or get an apprenticeship, so it's not as if it shuts off all options. THis would act as an effective screening filter.
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    In a few circumstances, like a missing teacher, then yes but in a lot of cases the students just have not motivated themselves to revise etc
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    Personally i feel that the students should have to pay for the resists themselves unless they failed because of extenuating (sorry can't spell it) circumstances or genuinly can't afford it. If however you had a school where the majority were failing then the school should have to subsidise the resits.
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    (Original post by GuppyFox)
    Call for school exam failure levy to aid FE colleges



    I think that the school has some responsibility if it can't educate students well enough - I believe that all students of good mental health have the ability to do well if they put the effort in. But this of course means that it's a matter of motivation and this could be the students/parents fault more than the teachers and schools ability to educate.

    What do you think - should schools be funding students who fail?
    I fell asleep in 4 out of 7 papers for the total of english and maths papers added together. I fell asleep for about an hour and a half in a 2 hour exam.
    I honestly can't agree with the school paying me to nap more as much as it would be funny.
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    (Original post by CaptainJosh)
    Certainly not, bar some very specific circumstances. As harsh as it sounds, the matter of the fact is that if you can't pass a basic English or Maths GCSE, you have no hope of passing an A-Level, nor of going into any meaningful higher education. I believe that students should be funded to resit if the rest of their grades are high, and mean that they would be able to do well in other A-Level subjects, because it's only their Maths/English which is holding them back. But, overall, if you can't pass a GCSE- which is a memory test, not an intelligence test- then you have absolutely no chance of going to sixth form or university. You could, of course, go to college or get an apprenticeship, so it's not as if it shuts off all options. THis would act as an effective screening filter.
    Lets review my education history.

    Maths - Predicted B got a C
    English - I fell asleep in the middle of most of the papers. So guess what! I failed.

    Went to college

    Passed an art course without drawing
    Passed english Igcse

    Now going to uni for computer programming.
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    I don't think it's necesserily the case of lazy students most the time - you certainly shouldn't make everyone pay for the sake of a few lazy people. Many people need these qualifications to move on in life and some may struggle to pay the money for retakes. I don't think it's fair to make someone who would struggle to afford a retake, pay for it. I simply don't buy this lazy student argument either - yes some don't bother to revise - but again, is it fair that a lazy student from a background where money isn't as much an issue gets a chance at a retake, but a lazy student who would struggle to pay for a retake doesn't? As much as I understand that people can get annoyed at 'lazy students', would we rather them not resit it and ruin their career prospects so their chance of spending their life on benefits is increased, or would we rather them get the qualification they need and get into an apprenticeship or something? The whole of society benefits when just one is educated. It would cost the government a lot more to pay for someone who needs extra income support because they can't get a job due to lack of qualifications, than it would for them to spend a little money on a retake fee. That's the view I take on it anyway.

    EDIT: Just read the article (which I probably should have done in the first place) and realise I may be off topic :P Reading the article I don't think schools should have some sort of 'penalty' if students retake at FE. It's not necesserily just down to teaching of that school that may have caused a child to fail. It would also put greater financial strain on schools making it harder to provide a decent education. This is just a suggestion, maybe the government should properly fund further education and then they may not have to come up with ridiculous solutions to what shouldn't be a problem if FE was properly funded...
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    Damn the misleading poll question! I answered it in the widget only to find the matter being discussed is quite different. :/
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    (Original post by k4l397)
    I don't think it's necesserily the case of lazy students most the time - you certainly shouldn't make everyone pay for the sake of a few lazy people. Many people need these qualifications to move on in life and some may struggle to pay the money for retakes. I don't think it's fair to make someone who would struggle to afford a retake, pay for it. I simply don't buy this lazy student argument either - yes some don't bother to revise - but again, is it fair that a lazy student from a background where money isn't as much an issue gets a chance at a retake, but a lazy student who would struggle to pay for a retake doesn't? As much as I understand that people can get annoyed at 'lazy students', would we rather them not resit it and ruin their career prospects so their chance of spending their life on benefits is increased, or would we rather them get the qualification they need and get into an apprenticeship or something? The whole of society benefits when just one is educated. It would cost the government a lot more to pay for someone who needs extra income support because they can't get a job due to lack of qualifications, than it would for them to spend a little money on a retake fee. That's the view I take on it anyway.
    Couldn't agree with you more!!! I wanted to contribute to the argument, but there's nothing else left to say after this
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    I can't think of a single good reason for schools to be expected to pay for re-takes in any circumstance (other than when they are directly responsible for a student under-performing or not taking an exam). They seem to be financially stretched as it is in providing the actual education without needlessly paying for re-takes for the benefit of students who didn't do as well as they would have liked and who are more than capable of finding the money themselves.
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    I don't see how this would be beneficial if they pay then their funding will go down then potentially standards will drop further until what? Why not just work on raising individual school standards rather than competing in this way it'll just drive some schools through the ground
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    Of course!The education standards have been falling for the past few decades and are not as good as other european countries (in terms of GCSEs)
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    I think that someone should pay for retakes in the cases of those who have no way of financing the retakes themselves and partial payment for those from middling incomes but I don't think that should come out of a FE centre's limited funding really. That just seems unfair on centres that might have a higher proportion of those who fail for reasons outside their own control.
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    Yes I agree with it, however the bill should be split 50:50 between the school and parents.

    No matter what the circumstance for it, the college has to spend more money on resources to reteach and then have the student to resit the exam and the college won't be getting all the money it needs. Even if the student had a bad day or they have some kind of disability making it more difficult to reach a C grade, it should be 50:50.

    Individual schools can decide whether they subsidise the parent's half or part of it.
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    So far most people on this thread have talked about utter rubbish the whole article and point of this thread is whether schools should pay for students resitting at FE colleges instead of FE colleges(the students don't pay colleges pay for them the same as with a levels).I think I agree with it this would give schools more motivation to help students pass English and Maths.
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    (Original post by CaptainJosh)
    As harsh as it sounds, the matter of the fact is that if you can't pass a basic English or Maths GCSE, you have no hope of passing an A-Level, nor of going into any meaningful higher education.
    I left school with an F in English and an E in Maths. I'm going to UCL. What were you saying? :rolleyes:
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    (Original post by Snufkin)
    I left school with an F in English and an E in Maths. I'm going to UCL. What were you saying? :rolleyes:
    What course are you doing?
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    (Original post by CaptainJosh)
    What course are you doing?
    See profile.
 
 
 
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