monkeyboy18000
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Ok so my exams are a long way but I want to be prepared. I am aiming for a* in biology, chemistry and physics because I want to study medicine. Does anyone have any revision techniques on how I can remember all the content and how to do well in the exams?
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monkeyboy18000
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Oh btw, I'm doing AQA
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ihatehannah
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(Original post by monkeyboy18000)
Oh btw, I'm doing AQA
CGP books for every science and then do every past paper you can.
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abitpissy
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(Original post by monkeyboy18000)
Ok so my exams are a long way but I want to be prepared. I am aiming for a* in biology, chemistry and physics because I want to study medicine. Does anyone have any revision techniques on how I can remember all the content and how to do well in the exams?
Do Not Mess Up the coursework. I wish I was told that.
I got AAA.
If my coursework was an B at least I would have A* A A*.( got a c on all coursework). It may be worth only 25% of the coursework but it makes a difference to your overall grade.
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Dhanihk
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Cram your head full of knowledge. Memorise facts and test yourself again and again. Do all the past papers and mark them (or get teachers to mark them).

Sadly, it's a memory test, more than a test of actual scientific ability.
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danniegee
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Is this at GCSE level?

If so, here are some tips:
- Print off the specification for your course.
- Buy the CGP revision guides and workbooks for your course - they're on buy-one-get-one-half-price at the moment in Waterstones as we bought some for my little bro yesterday, but you might be able to find them online. Learn each page in the revision guide; you could make mind maps/posters/flashcards or however you learn best - my favourite has always been mind maps!
- Once you've learnt the stuff from the revision guide, go answer the questions in the workbooks, then mark them.
- Now, go back to your specifications and highlight the bits you got completely right and think you'll never forget in orange, the bits you got partially right/sort of know in yellow, and leave the rest blank. Don't worry if there's not much orange yet!
- Next, make posters and colourful notes about all of the yellow and blank bits in your spec, and test yourself on them if possible - everyday, go over these notes and make more notes on the bits you keep forgetting. Highlight the spec alongside your learning.
- When you reckon you've got most of it, start past papers - by this point, you should be able to recognise which bits of the spec you're being tested on in each question. Go through and analyse the mark schemes and examiner reports to understand what they want you to write.

For anything you still consistently get wrong, write out 'emergency' post-it notes in capital letters and bright colours and stick them on your wall. Every time the post-it falls off the wall, revise it. Ideally, buy cheap post-its so that they fall off the wall more often

Hopes this helps
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Turtlebunny
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CRAM!

No don't. That's what I did :3

Overall, learn the stuff whatever way you wish first, then do ALL of the past papers like 5 times. Then you can enjoy your A*'s in Biology, Chemistry and Physics.
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vis break
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My Gcse Science. Just watch the videos. I used those on the week of my GCSE's and got AA in double.
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Jooooshy
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Pay attention in class and then do the past papers. When you mark a past paper, keep a list of all of the questions you've got wrong, study the topic they belong to and then re-attempt them before you do your next past paper. Worked for me.

EDIT: Also, since you're planning on doing medicine, don't neglect the rest of your GCSEs.
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CoolCavy
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Work hard
Revise for each end of topic/unit test
Make sure to go over unit 1 even though it is 'easier' than the other 2 as if you don't do as well in unit 3 say you can make up for it by getting a high grade in unit 1.
Use either CGP or the Nelson Thornes revision guides
Do loads of past papers
Start revising early (not too early though)
Keep your notes organised and easy to read.
Look at the course specifications for each science
Stick things that are hard to learn/need memorising on your wall and read it before you go to sleep each night

Worked for me
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sandvika
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(Original post by ihatehannah)
CGP books for every science and then do every past paper you can.
CGP is cancer in my opinion
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Polapod
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For me I just bought the CGP books and literally wrote down every bit of information that was useful onto a piece of paper from the book the night before the test, I ended up with over 200 pages of double sided notes for my sciences overall. Give yourself more time than one day but honestly it doesn't really require much deep understanding of what you're learning, just a memory test so also read the syllabus because there was 1 or 2 questions on the exams that the books didn't cover but were tucked away on the syllabus.

Coursework is relatively important as it's 25% of your overall grade for each science so getting A*s on them is handy to pull your grade up but the coursework isn't that hard, most teachers guide you through very easily
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Joshua-P
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(Original post by sandvika)
CGP is cancer in my opinion
Why?
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funkymonster
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CGP can often have incorrect info, too much info or too little info. They are good revision guides but I would say buy the textbooks that the board publish and keep in check with the specification. However, I have spotted a few mistakes on the boards textbooks as well so I guess just make sure you know what to learn.

Do well in your coursework because they can make a difference.
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Morgan_
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The cgp guides are great, but sometimes a little inaccurate with techical terms so be warned! Literally just go over everything as many times as possible and do every past paper and question available to you!
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n_hundred
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To be fair you don't need a teacher(mine was useless), Just use the CPG revision guides and just read them multiple times until you understand everything then around exam leave time, do most of the past papers and Mark until you are doing past papers and are pretty confident skip questions that's what got me the a*'s which now seem pointless .., in December just take a good break from most revision and good luck guys. - just don't stress but keep on top of revision
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