cambridge Watch

This discussion is closed.
Unregistered
Badges:
#141
Report 16 years ago
#141
When I was considering my application I felt that being able to benefit socially and culturally as well as academically from the Oxbridge experience was really important, and chose a degree that supports this approach – Archaeology and Anthropology. I’m on a gap year and will be starting at Cambridge next term. What subject did you decide upon after rejecting SPS?
I went for history and politics, new course but a great one. You get the usual teething problems as its only been going a couple of years but I'd recommend it to anyone, especially as two of Oxford's strongest subjects are history and politics. In general I think a joint schools degree is likely to provide you with a more diverse educational base and the juggling of two subjects, though a bit demanding, pays dividends when you finally get the hang of it- I'm sure you will find this when you start your degree, and I imagine it is the case for SPS, PPE etc. Its also great to be able to bring the knowledge of one subject to the other, particularly if they are complementary- history and politics students at Oxford get better results on average then PPE students in politics papers and History students in history papers! What other reason could you need?!
0
saphenous
Badges: 0
#142
Report Thread starter 16 years ago
#142
(Original post by Haz)
Hi, yes - you will probably have two or three interviews, each with one or two people (although this varies from subject to subject.) They make notes and decide who to admit after they have reviewed all applicants' interviews, references, and in the case of Medicine, their entrance paper.

The whole process is daunting but it's over quickly and definitely worth a shot, trust me! Interviewers do try to encourage you to perform to the best of your ability and don't try to trip you up. Have you been in touch with the admissions office?

Hey Haz,
it was the admissions office that encouraged me to apply. So now I'm
into this whole process. Ugh.
0
Bumblebee3
Badges: 0
Rep:
?
#143
Report 16 years ago
#143
(Original post by saphenous)
Hey Haz,
it was the admissions office that encouraged me to apply. So now I'm
into this whole process. Ugh.
Believe me I know how you feel - the forms, the deadlines, worrying about interviews... but it IS worth it! Even if you don't get in you will have spent a goodly amount of time talking to some of the leading people in the field of Medicine, which is a great opportunity in itself.

Do you have anyone (eg tutor/teacher) that is able to help you with your application?
0
saphenous
Badges: 0
#144
Report Thread starter 16 years ago
#144
(Original post by Haz)
Believe me I know how you feel - the forms, the deadlines, worrying about interviews... but it IS worth it! Even if you don't get in you will have spent a goodly amount of time talking to some of the leading people in the field of Medicine, which is a great opportunity in itself.

Do you have anyone (eg tutor/teacher) that is able to help you with your application?

Haz,
I am doing everything on my own. Is this bad? :confused:
0
Bumblebee3
Badges: 0
Rep:
?
#145
Report 16 years ago
#145
(Original post by saphenous)
Haz,
I am doing everything on my own. Is this bad? :confused:
No, don’t worry – not every applicant has people to help that have previous Oxbridge experience. I certainly didn’t – my school was useless! However, there is some controversy on this issue because students who know the application procedure well and are given advice on interviews and personal statements have an advantage.

There is a service run by Oxbridge graduates that, for about £500 will use their insider knowledge to train applicants for interviews. The university’s official opinion of the service is that they disapprove (as do I). They also claim that interviewers can spot training. On the other hand, the training apparently ups an applicant’s chance of success from 26% to as high as 75%.

Don’t let this depress you – just draw the same lessons that I did: by taking an independent approach you are more likely to stand out as being an original individual. Also (whether you pay someone to do it for you or not) you must find out about the colleges and the course in order to justify your choices. I visited the website www.Oxbridge-info.co.uk. It has profiles written by previous applicants and is extremely useful in telling you what to expect from interviews.

I would be your own tutor and ask the admissions office for a past MVAT paper to practice with. Much of the preparation work is just common sense and you should be well placed to make it on your own.
0
saphenous
Badges: 0
#146
Report Thread starter 16 years ago
#146
(Original post by Haz)
No, don’t worry – not every applicant has people to help that have previous Oxbridge experience. I certainly didn’t – my school was useless! However, there is some controversy on this issue because students who know the application procedure well and are given advice on interviews and personal statements have an advantage.

There is a service run by Oxbridge graduates that, for about £500 will use their insider knowledge to train applicants for interviews. The university’s official opinion of the service is that they disapprove (as do I). They also claim that interviewers can spot training. On the other hand, the training apparently ups an applicant’s chance of success from 26% to as high as 75%.

Don’t let this depress you – just draw the same lessons that I did: by taking an independent approach you are more likely to stand out as being an original individual. Also (whether you pay someone to do it for you or not) you must find out about the colleges and the course in order to justify your choices. I visited the website www.Oxbridge-info.co.uk. It has profiles written by previous applicants and is extremely useful in telling you what to expect from interviews.

I would be your own tutor and ask the admissions office for a past MVAT paper to practice with. Much of the preparation work is just common sense and you should be well placed to make it on your own.
Haz, what kind of advice can they/you give on personal statement?
0
Bumblebee3
Badges: 0
Rep:
?
#147
Report 16 years ago
#147
(Original post by saphenous)
Haz, what kind of advice can they/you give on personal statement?
Hi, if you mean ‘they’ as in Oxbridge-info, each applicant’s profile has a section where they give advice about personal statements. The basics are telling the truth (don’t say you’ve read something if you haven’t), only mention things you can talk further about at interview and be concise – you haven’t much space.

Mention things you’ve read/done/interest you that the interviewer can ask you about. I don’t know much about Medicine, but maybe research an interesting case that’s been in the news recently, and in case they stray away from the scientific, have something to say about medical ethics or the like. What do your parents say about you applying?
0
saphenous
Badges: 0
#148
Report Thread starter 16 years ago
#148
No,Haz, I mean the interview people charging 500 pounds for help.
0
mrmarsupial
Badges: 2
Rep:
?
#149
Report 16 years ago
#149
Dont know dont care, not going there.
0
Bumblebee3
Badges: 0
Rep:
?
#150
Report 16 years ago
#150
(Original post by saphenous)
No,Haz, I mean the interview people charging 500 pounds for help.
Oh, right. Ok, they charge around £60 for help with personal statement and application form alone and prices range from £60-£800 for other services incl. College picking and interview training. They claim to help you write a personal statement that will make you stand out to tutors.

Usually I would say that this service undermines the best efforts of the university to select the kind of students it wants and a tutored application and interview response may well be spotted and count against you anyway. However, they also give advice to overseas applicants like yourself and I can see that being unfamiliar with the application process could put you at a disadvantage. You can contact them via their website: www.oxbridgeapplications.com
0
Bumblebee3
Badges: 0
Rep:
?
#151
Report 16 years ago
#151
(Original post by mrmarsupial)
Dont know dont care, not going there.
Hi, I would just like to say to everyone waiting for results I wish you the very best of luck and hope you get your uni places! If you had/have an Oxbridge offer go to new thread 'Oxbridge - get the results?' and yell about it.
0
saphenous
Badges: 0
#152
Report Thread starter 16 years ago
#152
(Original post by Haz)
Hi, I would just like to say to everyone waiting for results I wish you the very best of luck and hope you get your uni places! If you had/have an Oxbridge offer go to new thread 'Oxbridge - get the results?' and yell about it.

Hi Haz,
i am so worried about my personal statement---do they interview everyone who applies to cambridge or can they immediately tell you that you aren't being considered? How do I know if I get an interview?


Best, Saph
0
Bigcnee
Badges: 2
Rep:
?
#153
Report 16 years ago
#153
(Original post by saphenous)
Hi Haz,
i am so worried about my personal statement---do they interview everyone who applies to cambridge or can they immediately tell you that you aren't being considered? How do I know if I get an interview?


Best, Saph
They send you a letter with your interview date
0
Bumblebee3
Badges: 0
Rep:
?
#154
Report 16 years ago
#154
(Original post by saphenous)
Hi Haz,
i am so worried about my personal statement---do they interview everyone who applies to cambridge or can they immediately tell you that you aren't being considered? How do I know if I get an interview?


Best, Saph
About 90% of applicants get to interview stage and if the admissions office told you to apply it's a pretty safe bet you will get to the interviews. Don't worry about your personal statement - you just need to say what things interest you and why - academic and social stuff too - they want to see that you will contribute to the social and not just academic life of the uni.

The college will write to you telling you if you have an interview and giving you the details. From my experience they're good at keeping in touch with candidates.
0
Unregistered
Badges:
#155
Report 16 years ago
#155
(Original post by Unregistered)
As this thread is titled Cambridge I can tell you that accommodation at Trinity in first year is either in Wolfsons or Blue Boar Courts. Wolfson was built in the 60's and is a concrete monolith. The only recently built accommodation (late 80's) is Burrells Fields which is for 2nd years. You can have rooms in Great Court (15th century) after first year if you are what is called a scholar (i.e. top students based on end of year exams) but that privilege is for one year only.
Do all colleges have nicer rooms for scholars? After that one year do they get worse rooms? I thought rooms for the second and third years were allocated by ballot.
0
saphenous
Badges: 0
#156
Report Thread starter 16 years ago
#156
Thanks Haz,
know anything about the pooling system? I even heard of one person applying for 2001 and being offered instead a position for 2002.
So is it safe to say you are not really competiting against everyone who
is applying but just yourself?









(Original post by Haz)
About 90% of applicants get to interview stage and if the admissions office told you to apply it's a pretty safe bet you will get to the interviews. Don't worry about your personal statement - you just need to say what things interest you and why - academic and social stuff too - they want to see that you will contribute to the social and not just academic life of the uni.

The college will write to you telling you if you have an interview and giving you the details. From my experience they're good at keeping in touch with candidates.
0
Bumblebee3
Badges: 0
Rep:
?
#157
Report 16 years ago
#157
(Original post by saphenous)
Thanks Haz,
know anything about the pooling system? I even heard of one person applying for 2001 and being offered instead a position for 2002.
So is it safe to say you are not really competiting against everyone who
is applying but just yourself?
If the college thinks that you are good enough for Cambridge but doesn't have room, they will offer your application to other colleges. You will be notified as to whether you have a place or have been pooled in early Jan. If you have been pooled you either are made an offer straight away, or your pool college will interview you. You will know the outcome fairly shortly.

Sometimes they do ask if you are prepared to go a year later, if they think you would benefit from a gap year or if they will have more room next year. I doubt that they would ask you that because you are a mature student. Each year 1141 people apply for medicine and about 292 are accepted so it is a tough ride. However, med courses anywhere in the uk are competitive so I would definately have a go!
0
saphenous
Badges: 0
#158
Report Thread starter 16 years ago
#158
Haz,
are some colleges considered better colleges than others?
Better academically, or socially, or what not?








(Original post by Haz)
If the college thinks that you are good enough for Cambridge but doesn't have room, they will offer your application to other colleges. You will be notified as to whether you have a place or have been pooled in early Jan. If you have been pooled you either are made an offer straight away, or your pool college will interview you. You will know the outcome fairly shortly.

Sometimes they do ask if you are prepared to go a year later, if they think you would benefit from a gap year or if they will have more room next year. I doubt that they would ask you that because you are a mature student. Each year 1141 people apply for medicine and about 292 are accepted so it is a tough ride. However, med courses anywhere in the uk are competitive so I would definately have a go!
0
Bumblebee3
Badges: 0
Rep:
?
#159
Report 16 years ago
#159
(Original post by saphenous)
Haz,
are some colleges considered better colleges than others?
Better academically, or socially, or what not?
lol, yes and no. They all share the same faculties so teaching will be the same wherever u end up. However, some aquire a reputation for certain subjects eg. Caius for law. The only way that this will really affect you is that some colleges receive more applications than others in a certain subjects. Corpus and Pembroke take many applications for med and Caius not so many. As I said, being a mature student you need to check with the admissions office what colleges (if all of them!) to consider.
0
saphenous
Badges: 0
#160
Report Thread starter 16 years ago
#160
with the pool and all, does it even matter if I apply to a high applicant college? or one that has very few spaces for the subject that I am studying?


Thanks.









(Original post by Haz)
lol, yes and no. They all share the same faculties so

teaching will be the same wherever u end up. However, some aquire a reputation for certain subjects eg. Caius for law. The only way that this will really affect you is that some colleges receive more applications than others in a certain subjects. Corpus and Pembroke take many applications for med and Caius not so many. As I said, being a mature student you need to check with the admissions office what colleges (if all of them!) to consider.
0
X
new posts

All the exam results help you need

1,070

people online now

225,530

students helped last year
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise

Are you going to self-release into Clearing?

Yes I've pressed the button (97)
18.87%
No I'm happy with my uni offer (327)
63.62%
Not yet but I am planning to (24)
4.67%
Not yet but I might (66)
12.84%

Watched Threads

View All
Latest
My Feed