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What is A-level art, Pure copying/drawing skill? watch

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    I just wondered what guys out there think what A-level art means, especially getting an A-grade, cos it seems like you have to be excellent at observational drawing or copying...when in fact, there is a loss of personal style? :confused:
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    (Original post by sweetymango)
    I just wondered what guys out there think what A-level art means, especially getting an A-grade, cos it seems like you have to be excellent at observational drawing or copying...when in fact, there is a loss of personal style? :confused:
    I can't draw for toffee and I still got an A. A level art is as much about the research, analysis, experimentation that you are willing to do and creative ideas that you have as it is about a natural talent for drawing. Some much more talented people than me in my class got lower grades (to my great shame - they really deserved higher) just because their portfolios weren't detailled enough with notes etc...
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    (Original post by sweetymango)
    I just wondered what guys out there think what A-level art means, especially getting an A-grade, cos it seems like you have to be excellent at observational drawing or copying...when in fact, there is a loss of personal style? :confused:
    its like that for me in GCSE, thats why i hated it. wont let me do i want to express :mad:
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    its a pain in the arse and requires work all year round rather than just at the end - a right f**kin pain
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    it means.....FAVOURITISM!
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    (Original post by grey faerie)
    I can't draw for toffee and I still got an A. A level art is as much about the research, analysis, experimentation that you are willing to do and creative ideas that you have as it is about a natural talent for drawing. Some much more talented people than me in my class got lower grades (to my great shame - they really deserved higher) just because their portfolios weren't detailled enough with notes etc...
    That's interesting, obviously there must be a degree of skill,but I think it must just be my teachers, I always get the impression that everything has to be precise. Research, as into the work of other artists...? Analysing artists work, and...your own about methods/outcomes?

    What are u doing now?
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    (Original post by John Paul Jones)
    its a pain in the arse and requires work all year round rather than just at the end - a right f**kin pain

    i remember teacher kept on saying:
    "you will get what you deserve in the end"
    but i don't think...it's true now, and to be honest, i don't think it's a good idea to do art alevel with other alevels, too time consuming!
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    (Original post by sweetymango)
    That's interesting, obviously there must be a degree of skill,but I think it must just be my teachers, I always get the impression that everything has to be precise. Research, as into the work of other artists...? Analysing artists work, and...your own about methods/outcomes?

    What are u doing now?
    Yeh, research just as in keeping a good journal, making the presentation nice (nice in an arty way, not neatly ruled with titles and dates etc...). Looking at the work of other artists, annotating it, developing your ideas from it and keeping a constant record of the way in which you're thinking and for what reasons you are going to do what you do next. Taking the styles of other artists you like and manipulating them, combining them, making the work personalised in some way. I was never precise...very messy, in fact. Lots of experimentation; fill up your journal with sketches, photos, trial patches of techniques you want to do on a larger scale (maybe printing, painting...). Then draw it all together and come up with a final idea It is pretty much constant work - it's really hard to develop and trial ideas if you slack and then leave everything to the last minute! Art was my most time consuming subject.

    I'm doing a classics degree now
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    (Original post by grey faerie)
    Yeh, research just as in keeping a good journal, making the presentation nice (nice in an arty way, not neatly ruled with titles and dates etc...). Looking at the work of other artists, annotating it, developing your ideas from it and keeping a constant record of the way in which you're thinking and for what reasons you are going to do what you do next. Taking the styles of other artists you like and manipulating them, combining them, making the work personalised in some way. I was never precise...very messy, in fact. Lots of experimentation; fill up your journal with sketches, photos, trial patches of techniques you want to do on a larger scale (maybe printing, painting...). Then draw it all together and come up with a final idea It is pretty much constant work - it's really hard to develop and trial ideas if you slack and then leave everything to the last minute! Art was my most time consuming subject.

    I'm doing a classics degree now
    Thanks for the advice, shame I'm near the very end of the course, and I'm wanting to put my efforts into my other subjects through revision. Although teacher reckons that if 'you work your butt off for A2, you can pull the grade up'...I think it'll be impossible, since A2s in many subjects progress in difficulty.
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    As far as I know, it's not necessarily precision work, as much as expressing yourself. Yes, there is a lot of research to be done, and I'm told that A-level art is different from GCSE standard. Apparently A-level art is based much more around folder work, rather than a final piece (as it is in GCSE) can anyone confirm this?
    I'm always lacking in folder work! I'm a perfectionist when it comes to art, so I seem to try for small amounts of high quality rather than a lot of sketches and ideas...
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    (Original post by sweetymango)
    i remember teacher kept on saying:
    "you will get what you deserve in the end"
    but i don't think...it's true now, and to be honest, i don't think it's a good idea to do art alevel with other alevels, too time consuming!

    true, but the good thing is that i only have 2 a levels to revise for
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    (Original post by sweetymango)
    I think it'll be impossible, since A2s in many subjects progress in difficulty.
    I don't think art really gets more difficult - well, not in terms of technical ability. I did edexcel and the main difference was that at AS the units were farily structured and we got given the themes. A2 was just license to do what we wanted under the titles 'contextual study' and 'problem solving' - it takes more self-discipline and a willingness to put the time into developing your own projects, but it's not like your ability to paint suddenly has to reach a higher level or anything.
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    There's quite alot of flexibility in art, you can do some really creative non-precise random stuff and get an A for it. Yea it really does take up loads of time tho, i spent most of my weekends catching up and trying to bulk up my folder!
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    depending what board/syllabus u do, it can be very very flexible- i did AQA, and basically you do what u like. it is a lot of work, i'd only recommend you take it if you find drawing/painting/creating art in any way something enjoyable/relaxing....you'll struggle to get the work done otherwise. i love drawing, but didn't work, and basically rushed my projects at the end. whatever you do do NOT think it's an easy option....it isn't! doing one drawing takes much longer than answering a 3 mark biology/chemistry question.

    as gfor skill, well the more you draw/paint etc the more you'll develop...i found that i've actually ended up imitating some of my friend's style and it seemed to work quite well for me last year
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    (Original post by kenkennykenken)
    There's quite alot of flexibility in art, you can do some really creative non-precise random stuff and get an A for it. Yea it really does take up loads of time tho, i spent most of my weekends catching up and trying to bulk up my folder!
    I think it must be just my crazy teachers then, because one of them keeps on saying, "This is not A-level standard" - and it was an observation, it was ...a creation... So your bulking up your folder for AS?
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    (Original post by priya)
    depending what board/syllabus u do, it can be very very flexible- i did AQA, and basically you do what u like. it is a lot of work, i'd only recommend you take it if you find drawing/painting/creating art in any way something enjoyable/relaxing....you'll struggle to get the work done otherwise. i love drawing, but didn't work, and basically rushed my projects at the end. whatever you do do NOT think it's an easy option....it isn't! doing one drawing takes much longer than answering a 3 mark biology/chemistry question.

    as gfor skill, well the more you draw/paint etc the more you'll develop...i found that i've actually ended up imitating some of my friend's style and it seemed to work quite well for me last year
    so what were the outcomes of ur rushed projects?
    I think i've lost steam for art...but it depends what topics it is, like Edexcel AS the first two topics are set and the exam piece, like a Yr13 said, you can twist it to what you want to do. I feel disheartened by the teachers, like saying 'Grade A copying' which leads to misconceptions...
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    (Original post by grey faerie)
    I don't think art really gets more difficult - well, not in terms of technical ability. I did edexcel and the main difference was that at AS the units were farily structured and we got given the themes. A2 was just license to do what we wanted under the titles 'contextual study' and 'problem solving' - it takes more self-discipline and a willingness to put the time into developing your own projects, but it's not like your ability to paint suddenly has to reach a higher level or anything.
    I suppose it's my teacher's fault, during our years at the school, the largest size of paper we have worked on is A3! Our school joined 6th form with a neighbouring sixth form, and so we were uncomfortable there when they liked workign on big sheets of paper and boards, which I find more expressive than a restricted sheet of A3. Then there's the teacher who brainwashes saying that before joining sixth forms they had 100% pass rate etc...
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    (Original post by sweetymango)
    I think it must be just my crazy teachers then, because one of them keeps on saying, "This is not A-level standard" - and it was an observation, it was ...a creation... So your bulking up your folder for AS?
    Nah I was bulking up my folder for A2. It's all finished now, all the coursework & personal study handed in, and done my exam for it. Sooo glad it's over! Yeah i know some teacher's are a bit strict on what they define as good art, altho in reality what they think is good might be total crap to others.
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    (Original post by Fleff)
    As far as I know, it's not necessarily precision work, as much as expressing yourself. Yes, there is a lot of research to be done, and I'm told that A-level art is different from GCSE standard. Apparently A-level art is based much more around folder work, rather than a final piece (as it is in GCSE) can anyone confirm this?
    I'm always lacking in folder work! I'm a perfectionist when it comes to art, so I seem to try for small amounts of high quality rather than a lot of sketches and ideas...
    At A-level they expect you to annotate your work, discussing techniques and outcomes, being critical, explaining, and justifying.
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    (Original post by kenkennykenken)
    Nah I was bulking up my folder for A2. It's all finished now, all the coursework & personal study handed in, and done my exam for it. Sooo glad it's over! Yeah i know some teacher's are a bit strict on what they define as good art, altho in reality what they think is good might be total crap to others.
    yes i remembering a msg from this site saying that looking at some of the work of famous artists; if they had been doing a-level they would have failed, which i suppose is a typical view of technique at alevel

    what other alevels have u been doing?
 
 
 
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