Modern Language Applicants for 2016-2017

Watch
Ruthikins
Badges: 2
Rep:
?
#1
Report Thread starter 5 years ago
#1
What Language(s) are you planning on studying? and why? ^.^
0
reply
kingsleyjones
Badges: 1
Rep:
?
#2
Report 5 years ago
#2
(Original post by Ruthikins)
What Language(s) are you planning on studying? and why? ^.^
French and Spanish... Also interested in picking up another language. I've seen that there's an optional module in first year called Scandinavian Languages which sounds pretty cool.
0
reply
Linaria
Badges: 7
Rep:
?
#3
Report 5 years ago
#3
I do Gaelic and I really want to study another language as well, but not sure which one yet. I already speak the Scandinavian langauges and not sure which other interesting ones UoE offers. Not too keen on any of the big three (German/French/Spanish)
0
reply
Quick-use
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#4
Report 5 years ago
#4
(Original post by kingsleyjones)
French and Spanish... Also interested in picking up another language. I've seen that there's an optional module in first year called Scandinavian Languages which sounds pretty cool.
My degree was originally French and Spanish and I did 2 years of that. I also did Japanese alongside them in my first 2 years and switched my degree to that at the end of 2nd year and I'm now on my year abroad in Tokyo!

(Original post by Linaria)
I do Gaelic and I really want to study another language as well, but not sure which one yet. I already speak the Scandinavian langauges and not sure which other interesting ones UoE offers. Not too keen on any of the big three (German/French/Spanish)
My friend did Gaelic at Edinburgh in 1st and 2nd year.

There are quite a few languages you can do: Scandinavian ones, German, French, Spanish, Italian, Portuguese, Japanese, Chinese Mandarin, Korean (starting officially next September), Russian, Arabic, Persian and Turkish.

I think those are all the languages offered at Edinburgh as official credit modules unless I've missed some. You can probably take other languages I've not mentioned as open courses/foundation if there are other languages not offered as credit modules, but I have no idea.
0
reply
Linaria
Badges: 7
Rep:
?
#5
Report 5 years ago
#5
(Original post by Quick-use)
My degree was originally French and Spanish and I did 2 years of that. I also did Japanese alongside them in my first 2 years and switched my degree to that at the end of 2nd year and I'm now on my year abroad in Tokyo!



My friend did Gaelic at Edinburgh in 1st and 2nd year.

There are quite a few languages you can do: Scandinavian ones, German, French, Spanish, Italian, Portuguese, Japanese, Chinese Mandarin, Korean (starting officially next September), Russian, Arabic, Persian and Turkish.

I think those are all the languages offered at Edinburgh as official credit modules unless I've missed some. You can probably take other languages I've not mentioned as open courses/foundation if there are other languages not offered as credit modules, but I have no idea.
Thanks for the reply Doing 1st year Gaelic now and I love it! I'm an exchange student though, so I have to apply to do a degree in Edinburgh.

So many languages to learn! Hope I get to study some of them
0
reply
Vonnie97
Badges: 0
Rep:
?
#6
Report 4 years ago
#6
I've applied for German and Italian. And I really want to sign up for another language, perhaps Japanese.
0
reply
Quick-use
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#7
Report 4 years ago
#7
(Original post by Vonnie97)
I've applied for German and Italian. And I really want to sign up for another language, perhaps Japanese.
I can vouch for Japanese! The department's really good! However, since the regular Japanese language courses are really intensive, they hugely recommend students not doing Japanese as their degree to do Foundation Japanese as opposed to Japanese 1 in the first year.

This is how it works:

Foundation Japanese 1 (1 semester course)
Foundation Japanese 2 (1 semester course)
Foundation Japanese 3 (1 semester course)
Japanese 1 (full year course / 2 semester course)
Japanese 2 (full year course / 2 semester course)
Intermediate Japanese (full year course / 2 semester course)

Students doing their degree as Japanese who have little or no prior knowledge of Japanese must take Japanese 1 in first year and it's a very intensive course. Those who already have a good knowledge of Japanese in first year take Japanese 2 in first year and then Intermediate Japanese in second year.

For non-degree students, it's highly recommended you take Foundation Japanese. It's not as intensive and it usually helps students who just want to try it first and maybe continue on to do Japanese 1 in the next year. The credits are easier to get as well since it's not as intensive which can be a good thing if you want to learn Japanese but don't want to sacrifice your main degree.

If you're really, really wanting to do Japanese 1 from the very get-go, are not a beginner in your first 2 languages, think you can cope with the workload and stress, then you can ask about it, but keep in mind that you might have to be very insistent for a place on Japanese 1. Also, it'll be tougher to get credits/better marks if you're not thinking of changing your degree.
0
reply
Vonnie97
Badges: 0
Rep:
?
#8
Report 4 years ago
#8
(Original post by Quick-use)
I can vouch for Japanese! The department's really good! However, since the regular Japanese language courses are really intensive, they hugely recommend students not doing Japanese as their degree to do Foundation Japanese as opposed to Japanese 1 in the first year.

This is how it works:

Foundation Japanese 1 (1 semester course)
Foundation Japanese 2 (1 semester course)
Foundation Japanese 3 (1 semester course)
Japanese 1 (full year course / 2 semester course)
Japanese 2 (full year course / 2 semester course)
Intermediate Japanese (full year course / 2 semester course)

Students doing their degree as Japanese who have little or no prior knowledge of Japanese must take Japanese 1 in first year and it's a very intensive course. Those who already have a good knowledge of Japanese in first year take Japanese 2 in first year and then Intermediate Japanese in second year.

For non-degree students, it's highly recommended you take Foundation Japanese. It's not as intensive and it usually helps students who just want to try it first and maybe continue on to do Japanese 1 in the next year. The credits are easier to get as well since it's not as intensive which can be a good thing if you want to learn Japanese but don't want to sacrifice your main degree.

If you're really, really wanting to do Japanese 1 from the very get-go, are not a beginner in your first 2 languages, think you can cope with the workload and stress, then you can ask about it, but keep in mind that you might have to be very insistent for a place on Japanese 1. Also, it'll be tougher to get credits/better marks if you're not thinking of changing your degree.
Well, I'd love to do Foundation Japanese but I don't know if that's possible. The uni website states that I can't take a modern language course at level 7. I don't know if I understand that correctly but I assumed that I can't take Foundation Japanese but I can take Japanese 1.

I really love Japan and the culture, though - and I really want to learn the language. Is it really that hard, considering I would be studying German at advanced level, Italian at beginner's level (I know Italian a little bit, but I've just started with it) and Japanese? And I would definitely need a part-time job since the UK is so much more expensive than the Czech Republic (yea, I'm an international student). Is that possible to handle or am I just going to figure out it can't be done? Thanks!
0
reply
Linaria
Badges: 7
Rep:
?
#9
Report 4 years ago
#9
(Original post by Quick-use)
I can vouch for Japanese! The department's really good! However, since the regular Japanese language courses are really intensive, they hugely recommend students not doing Japanese as their degree to do Foundation Japanese as opposed to Japanese 1 in the first year.

This is how it works:

Foundation Japanese 1 (1 semester course)
Foundation Japanese 2 (1 semester course)
Foundation Japanese 3 (1 semester course)
Japanese 1 (full year course / 2 semester course)
Japanese 2 (full year course / 2 semester course)
Intermediate Japanese (full year course / 2 semester course)

Students doing their degree as Japanese who have little or no prior knowledge of Japanese must take Japanese 1 in first year and it's a very intensive course. Those who already have a good knowledge of Japanese in first year take Japanese 2 in first year and then Intermediate Japanese in second year.

For non-degree students, it's highly recommended you take Foundation Japanese. It's not as intensive and it usually helps students who just want to try it first and maybe continue on to do Japanese 1 in the next year. The credits are easier to get as well since it's not as intensive which can be a good thing if you want to learn Japanese but don't want to sacrifice your main degree.

If you're really, really wanting to do Japanese 1 from the very get-go, are not a beginner in your first 2 languages, think you can cope with the workload and stress, then you can ask about it, but keep in mind that you might have to be very insistent for a place on Japanese 1. Also, it'll be tougher to get credits/better marks if you're not thinking of changing your degree.
This is how it works in Gaelic as well. I'm doing the intensive one at the moment and it's really tough, but a lot of fun as well. I think these easier courses are good for those who just want to learn some of the language, but don't intend on being relatively fluent within a year or two. I really hope I get to study the Foundation Japanese courses though seems like such an interesting language!
0
reply
Linaria
Badges: 7
Rep:
?
#10
Report 4 years ago
#10
(Original post by Vonnie97)
Well, I'd love to do Foundation Japanese but I don't know if that's possible. The uni website states that I can't take a modern language course at level 7. I don't know if I understand that correctly but I assumed that I can't take Foundation Japanese but I can take Japanese 1.

I really love Japan and the culture, though - and I really want to learn the language. Is it really that hard, considering I would be studying German at advanced level, Italian at beginner's level (I know Italian a little bit, but I've just started with it) and Japanese? And I would definitely need a part-time job since the UK is so much more expensive than the Czech Republic (yea, I'm an international student). Is that possible to handle or am I just going to figure out it can't be done? Thanks!
I got a warning before I started that Gaelic 1A would be too intense for me, but I decided to do it anyway, and I'm having no problem keeping up. It really depends on how interested you are, how much you are willing to study at home and how good you are at learning languages in general. I think it's possible if the will is there, even with a part-time job.
1
reply
Vonnie97
Badges: 0
Rep:
?
#11
Report 4 years ago
#11
(Original post by Linaria)
I got a warning before I started that Gaelic 1A would be too intense for me, but I decided to do it anyway, and I'm having no problem keeping up. It really depends on how interested you are, how much you are willing to study at home and how good you are at learning languages in general. I think it's possible if the will is there, even with a part-time job.
Thank you! That's great news, since I really want to learn another language.
0
reply
Quick-use
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#12
Report 4 years ago
#12
(Original post by Vonnie97)
Thank you! That's great news, since I really want to learn another language.
Just keep in mind that the staff won't easily allow you to do 2 beginner languages at intensive level + Japanese department can be strict with allowing other students to do Japanese 1 with no prior knowledge whatsoever as it's very intensive.

If you want to have a stronger case, I'd urge you to learn some Japanese during summer: learn the 2 alphabets called Hiragana and Katakana, and start going through some lessons of the first semester textbook known as Genki 1.

And, maybe learn some more of your other beginner language - Italian, right?

Good luck! You'll have a blast and your language skills will drastically improve if you put in the time and effort at university.
0
reply
Vonnie97
Badges: 0
Rep:
?
#13
Report 4 years ago
#13
(Original post by Quick-use)
Just keep in mind that the staff won't easily allow you to do 2 beginner languages at intensive level + Japanese department can be strict with allowing other students to do Japanese 1 with no prior knowledge whatsoever as it's very intensive.

If you want to have a stronger case, I'd urge you to learn some Japanese during summer: learn the 2 alphabets called Hiragana and Katakana, and start going through some lessons of the first semester textbook known as Genki 1.

And, maybe learn some more of your other beginner language - Italian, right?

Good luck! You'll have a blast and your language skills will drastically improve if you put in the time and effort at university.
Thank you. Well, I'm currently learning Italian (I've signed up for a course)... so I'll know the basics by then.
I'm definitely going to learn Japanese during summer since I won't have to study for my exams.
0
reply
katiegesmith
Badges: 0
Rep:
?
#14
Report 4 years ago
#14
I've applied for French and German, with German being my beginner language. Although technically im not a beginner in German, I got an A* in GCSE but unfortunately wasn't able to take it to A level and instead I took extra classes with a German assistant throughout the school year and went to a Goethe Institut course in the summer I just know my German isn't quite up to the same standard that my French is so I wouldn't be as confident with the grammar etc. Next summer after A2 exams I'm hoping to interrail around Europe and make a few stops in Germany so I'll have another chance to practice, and I'll definitely be visiting French speaking countries too!
0
reply
PaulMor
Badges: 0
Rep:
?
#15
Report 4 years ago
#15
I was planning on German and possibly Russian, but I just saw in this thread that they're introducing Korean?! Is this true?
0
reply
Quick-use
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#16
Report 4 years ago
#16
(Original post by PaulMor)
I was planning on German and possibly Russian, but I just saw in this thread that they're introducing Korean?! Is this true?
As far as I know, yes.
0
reply
PaulMor
Badges: 0
Rep:
?
#17
Report 4 years ago
#17
(Original post by Quick-use)
As far as I know, yes.
I see, thanks! Also, does Edinburgh do the similar "3 subjects for the first two years" thing that St.Andrews does? It sounds ideal to me!
0
reply
Quick-use
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#18
Report 4 years ago
#18
(Original post by PaulMor)
I see, thanks! Also, does Edinburgh do the similar "3 subjects for the first two years" thing that St.Andrews does? It sounds ideal to me!
Yes, it does as do all Scottish universities.

Just remember that, you might not always be able to do all 3 languages at intensive level, especially if you've only studied 1 before, and are doing the other 2 from scratch.

The intensive level language classes are meant for students studying the languages as their degree. For example, let's say your degree is German.

In first year, you might do: German 1B (let's say you're advanced at this), Russian 1 (you're a beginner and taking it as an extra course with other students who are doing it as their degree) and Foundation Korean (you're a beginner and are doing it as an extra course).

This means that in second year, you can easily change your degree to Russian and do Russian 2 since you've already got the credits from Russian 1. However, if you wanted to change your degree to Korean, you'd have to do an extra year because you'd need to do Korean 1 in your second year and then Korean 2 in your extra year, and then go into third year and fourth year.

I hope that makes sense?

I managed to do 3 languages in my first two years. My degree was French and Spanish, both of which I had already studied for years, and I had started Japanese from scratch. I did French 1B, Spanish 1B and Japanese 1. In second year, I did French 2, Spanish 2 and Japanese 2. I then changed my degree from French and Spanish to Japanese. I am currently on my year abroad in Tokyo!

Only French, Spanish and German have 1A and 1B classes in first year. Basically, if you do 1A then you do it from scratch but in one year, you get the same level as the B class which is more advanced and you all do Spanish/French/German 2 together. However, a foundation level language isn't as intensive and it'd prepare you to do level 1 in your next year if you wanted to.

I had to ask for permission to do my third language at intensive level rather than Foundation Japanese. It worked out because they saw I was super interested and that I had an aptitude for languages + I was only doing 1 language from scratch.

The levels for languages at Edinburgh are kind of like this:

Foundation language
Language 1 / 1A (beginners' class or slightly post-beginners') / 1B (advanced)
Language 2
Language 3 (year abroad)
Language 4

Foundation language classes can be offered in various levels for beginners and they're usually only 1 semester long. Language 1 or 2 courses are, however, usually 2 semester long/1 year long. Therefore, you can't do a foundation course in semester 1 and then do a language 1 course in the next semester. You'd have to do the language 1 in the next year.

A standard degree language student goes like this:
First year = Spanish 1A
Second year = Spanish 2
Third year = Spanish 3 (abroad)
Fourth year = Spanish 4 (various translation classes)

If, however, you did a foundation language course in first year which you wanted to change your degree to later, it could look like this:

First year = German 1B, Foundation Russian + another course
Second year = Russian 1 + other courses
Third year = Russian 2 + other course maybe
Fourth year = Russian 3 (abroad)
Fifth year = Russian 4

PS All the above is completely irrelevant if you just want to try a 2nd or 3rd language and don't necessarily want to change it to your degree in the future! Before going to university, I actually highly considered Japanese, so that's why I was adamant to do Japanese as my outside course alongside French and Spanish, meaning that if I ended up liking it, I could change my degree!
1
reply
PaulMor
Badges: 0
Rep:
?
#19
Report 4 years ago
#19
Thanks for the great reply! How is studying at Edinburgh/Tokyo if you don't mind me asking
0
reply
kinnix
Badges: 0
Rep:
?
#20
Report 4 years ago
#20
When it comes to studying modern languages, do you happen to know how the things work with IB system? I mean, I'm taking the french ab initio course, so I guess, my french will be quite good at the end of the course, but still, it's an ab initio one and I'm wondering if that would be a disadvantage when applying to Edinburgh to study e.g. French and Scandinavian Studies. Do you think they would prefer students with advanced knowledge of French?
0
reply
X

Quick Reply

Attached files
Write a reply...
Reply
new posts
Back
to top
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise

Current uni students - are you thinking of dropping out of university?

Yes, I'm seriously considering dropping out (95)
13.83%
I'm not sure (32)
4.66%
No, I'm going to stick it out for now (215)
31.3%
I have already dropped out (16)
2.33%
I'm not a current university student (329)
47.89%

Watched Threads

View All