Advice on how to get an A in AS-level German please? Watch

L.Yrru
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I have been considering whether or not I should do AS-level German. I managed to get an A* in German for my GCSEs, so I was wondering whether I should take German.

Sadly, we didn't focus much on our conversational skills during class, as teachers mainly tried to get us to learn the vocabulary in preparation for the exam. Therefore my speaking skills are lacking a bit, as in I find it quite difficult to hold a conversation and respond spontaneously.

My listening skills could still improve as well...

That being said, could anyone offer me some advice on how to get an A in German, please?
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pizzanomics
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(Original post by L.Yrru)
I have been considering whether or not I should do AS-level German. I managed to get an A* in German for my GCSEs, so I was wondering whether I should take German.

Sadly, we didn't focus much on our conversational skills during class, as teachers mainly tried to get us to learn the vocabulary in preparation for the exam. Therefore my speaking skills are lacking a bit, as in I find it quite difficult to hold a conversation and respond spontaneously.

My listening skills could still improve as well...

That being said, could anyone offer me some advice on how to get an A in German, please?
Check out a post I replied to here first - saves me having to type it out all over again!


I can actually give specific advise for German though, so here it is! I did AS and A2 German with WJEC.

If you're planning on taking German to A2 level, no matter what you get at AS, retake both units. You naturally get better at a language, so it just makes sense. I barely scraped a D at AS German, but I resat it this year along with my A2 exams (and no revision!) and got B (a few UMS off an A).

For the speaking exam, you need to make sure you keep talking. So if you're unsure whether or not what you're saying is correct, it's better to say something than nothing at all. You wont lose marks for accuracy (unless it's a very basic and obvious mistake that you really shouldn't have made), and you'll possibly gain marks for keeping the conversation going.

To help practice your speaking, always make an effort to talk in German during class and to anyone who can talk German fluently. So it might be worth staying behind/going to a lesson early to chat with your teacher in German about nothing in particular. You can also find native speakers online who may be willing to talk over skype - a good place to start for this would be /r/German. In fact, /r/German is a good resource overall to help with everything, and it's a good place to ask questions too.

Another good idea is to watch German films (with English subtitles if you prefer) to see how German is used when it's spoken. Personally I'd recommend Goobye Lenin! as it's easy enough to follow. If you want to practice listening comprehension then flick on the German subtitles so you can read what is being said. Don't worry if you don't completely understand it, sometimes the subitles wont match exactly what is being said (it's the same in English and almost every other language ever), just try and match the words and the sounds.

To put your listening comprehension to the test, check out the Top Thema on Deutsche Welle. You listen to a short news story (with a transcript underneath but try not to look at that) and then have to answer some questions based on what you heard/read.


Any other questions? Just ask!
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username818763
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As Shia LaBeouf said: JUST DO IT!
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midgemeister7
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Got an A this year first time round, luckily on the boundary - learn lots of vocab and try to speak German as much as possible. Also try to get to grips with the grammar early on; this will give you a huge advantage.
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L.Yrru
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(Original post by pizzanomics)
Check out a post I replied to here first - saves me having to type it out all over again!


I can actually give specific advise for German though, so here it is! I did AS and A2 German with WJEC.

If you're planning on taking German to A2 level, no matter what you get at AS, retake both units. You naturally get better at a language, so it just makes sense. I barely scraped a D at AS German, but I resat it this year along with my A2 exams (and no revision!) and got B (a few UMS off an A).

For the speaking exam, you need to make sure you keep talking. So if you're unsure whether or not what you're saying is correct, it's better to say something than nothing at all. You wont lose marks for accuracy (unless it's a very basic and obvious mistake that you really shouldn't have made), and you'll possibly gain marks for keeping the conversation going.

To help practice your speaking, always make an effort to talk in German during class and to anyone who can talk German fluently. So it might be worth staying behind/going to a lesson early to chat with your teacher in German about nothing in particular. You can also find native speakers online who may be willing to talk over skype - a good place to start for this would be /r/German. In fact, /r/German is a good resource overall to help with everything, and it's a good place to ask questions too.

Another good idea is to watch German films (with English subtitles if you prefer) to see how German is used when it's spoken. Personally I'd recommend Goobye Lenin! as it's easy enough to follow. If you want to practice listening comprehension then flick on the German subtitles so you can read what is being said. Don't worry if you don't completely understand it, sometimes the subitles wont match exactly what is being said (it's the same in English and almost every other language ever), just try and match the words and the sounds.

To put your listening comprehension to the test, check out the Top Thema on Deutsche Welle. You listen to a short news story (with a transcript underneath but try not to look at that) and then have to answer some questions based on what you heard/read.


Any other questions? Just ask!
Thank you so much for your advice! >.<

But uh... would you say that I would still be able to do all of this, as well as revise for other subjects such as Biology, Chemistry and Maths? At the moment, I have psychology down as my 4th subject because I thought that it would be quite interesting as well as not being as intense as the first 3 that I picked. If I were to pick German, would it be much more time-consuming?

One of my worries is that I don't even have an entire year to become relatively fluent enough at German. I'm not lacking the confidence to take this subject, because it seems rather logical in terms of how I would improve at it. But is it so time-consuming that it may affect the amount of time that I could spend on my three other subjects?

I mean, I'm planning to aim high in the sense that I really want to get all A's in my AS-level subjects... >.<

o___o'
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L.Yrru
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(Original post by midgemeister7)
Got an A this year first time round, luckily on the boundary - learn lots of vocab and try to speak German as much as possible. Also try to get to grips with the grammar early on; this will give you a huge advantage.
Thank you! I did think about trying to get my head around the grammar as well... I didn't mind the grammar so much when I was taking my GCSEs because it wasn't too complex, but I think it will be more challenging at AS... o.o
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meganb1998
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(Original post by L.Yrru)
I have been considering whether or not I should do AS-level German. I managed to get an A* in German for my GCSEs, so I was wondering whether I should take German.

Sadly, we didn't focus much on our conversational skills during class, as teachers mainly tried to get us to learn the vocabulary in preparation for the exam. Therefore my speaking skills are lacking a bit, as in I find it quite difficult to hold a conversation and respond spontaneously.

My listening skills could still improve as well...

That being said, could anyone offer me some advice on how to get an A in German, please?
I'm probably not the best person to ask seeing as I just got a D (B in speaking, D in the written exam) in AS German (but I'm getting a remark and may retake). I got an A at GCSE and, as others have said, the grammar is key. In my GCSE group grammar wasn't so much the focus and I wish that I had got a solid grounding in German grammar before I started year 12. If this is the case, I found the AQA AS German grammar workbook was useful (even if you don't do AQA).

As for speaking, speak as much as possible and listen as much as possible (once you have one the other comes more naturally). Try listening to a German radio station online while you do the homework - you don't necessarily have to focus hard on what's being said but you'll start to understand more. Also, at the beginning of each lesson, our teacher made us tell her what we did the day before and what we were going to do after school or at the weekend and we couldn't be boring! I think this worked - I got a B in the speaking exam.

Basically, the easiest way is to immerse yourself in the language whenever you can. Find someone to talk to in German and practice as much as possible
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NGMCupcake246
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(Original post by pizzanomics)
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If you're planning on taking German to A2 level, no matter what you get at AS, retake both units. You naturally get better at a language, so it just makes sense. I barely scraped a D at AS German, but I resat it this year along with my A2 exams (and no revision!) and got B (a few UMS off an A).
However the trouble with this is that we might not be able to retake the AS modules next year, as we are the last year to do them. They may just offer the A2 exams in Summer 2017 as the current year 11s, who will be in Year 12 then, won't be doing AS level German. Not unless its the course that is ONLY for the AS (doesn't count towards a full A level).
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