AbbiePeasy
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Hiya, I wanted to ask for advice on whether or not it would be worth applying to study History at Oxford. My concerns are my GCSE's and I would like honest opinions or experiences that may help!
When speaking to tutors, the main issue seems to be my GCSEs, in which i GOT a*, 7a's and 2bs. For any other university this would be fine but for oxbridge these are most definitely below average.
I worked hard and have received 4 good a's at AS level.
I love the Oxford course and have heard that doing well in the HAT test can sometimes override however good your GCSE grades might be.

Thank you if anyone is able to give advice, and if so, be honest! I know there are plenty of amazing universities to study history at, so will not be too disappointed if Oxbridge is a no go.
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colourtheory
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(Original post by AbbiePeasy)
Hiya, I wanted to ask for advice on whether or not it would be worth applying to study History at Oxford. My concerns are my GCSE's and I would like honest opinions or experiences that may help!
When speaking to tutors, the main issue seems to be my GCSEs, in which i GOT a*, 7a's and 2bs. For any other university this would be fine but for oxbridge these are most definitely below average.
I worked hard and have received 4 good a's at AS level.
I love the Oxford course and have heard that doing well in the HAT test can sometimes override however good your GCSE grades might be.

Thank you if anyone is able to give advice, and if so, be honest! I know there are plenty of amazing universities to study history at, so will not be too disappointed if Oxbridge is a no go.
Hey!

I got 2 A*s, 7 As, 2 Bs at GCSE and AABC at AS Level. I'm now a second year History student at Oxford!

GCSEs are combined with HAT scores to select the top 75% of candidates to invite to interview. After that point the interviews and HAT scores carry the most weight and will determine whether or not you get an offer
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AbbiePeasy
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(Original post by colourtheory)
Hey!

I got 2 A*s, 7 As, 2 Bs at GCSE and AABC at AS Level. I'm now a second year History student at Oxford!

GCSEs are combined with HAT scores to select the top 75% of candidates to invite to interview. After that point the interviews and HAT scores carry the most weight and will determine whether or not you get an offer
Thank you for your reply! Wow well done you, super helpful as well ! Any advice on how to succeed in the HAT?

(Also, are you liking your uni experience?)
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colourtheory
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(Original post by AbbiePeasy)
Thank you for your reply! Wow well done you, super helpful as well ! Any advice on how to succeed in the HAT?

(Also, are you liking your uni experience?)
The best advice I can give is to practice practice practice. Get a teacher to mark your attempts at past papers if possible. Do not go in unprepared!!

Section 1 - follow my advice for reading and you should be okay. The trick here is to be able to sum up the argument of a text in one or two lines only. Don't be too obvious either, think as intricately as you can about what the passage is saying. There is usually one clear line of argument that they wish you to pick up on, and a more nuanced second line of argument that will be rewarded with the highest marks. For example, does the historian suggest that the interaction between two factors caused a particular outcome? What are these factors? Look at past papers and mark schemes for more examples.

Section 2 - this is what you'll do on a weekly basis; constructing essays on a broad topic from knowledge you already have. In fact, these questions are very similar to those given to you to answer during prelims. Be clear, be subtle, be focussed. Don't just think in terms of 'religious, economic, social, and political factors' think much more specifically about what the factors are. For example, the role of political reform and legislation. Revise your AS modules in detail! This is essential if you hope to deploy evidence convincingly, and this will definitely get you extra marks.

Section 3 - be imaginative and focus on the material at hand. Are there any patterns that you can spot within the source? Who was it written by? When was it written? What can it tell you about those who wrote it? etc. etc.

Hope that helps!
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AbbiePeasy
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(Original post by colourtheory)
The best advice I can give is to practice practice practice. Get a teacher to mark your attempts at past papers if possible. Do not go in unprepared!!

Section 1 - follow my advice for reading and you should be okay. The trick here is to be able to sum up the argument of a text in one or two lines only. Don't be too obvious either, think as intricately as you can about what the passage is saying. There is usually one clear line of argument that they wish you to pick up on, and a more nuanced second line of argument that will be rewarded with the highest marks. For example, does the historian suggest that the interaction between two factors caused a particular outcome? What are these factors? Look at past papers and mark schemes for more examples.

Section 2 - this is what you'll do on a weekly basis; constructing essays on a broad topic from knowledge you already have. In fact, these questions are very similar to those given to you to answer during prelims. Be clear, be subtle, be focussed. Don't just think in terms of 'religious, economic, social, and political factors' think much more specifically about what the factors are. For example, the role of political reform and legislation. Revise your AS modules in detail! This is essential if you hope to deploy evidence convincingly, and this will definitely get you extra marks.

Section 3 - be imaginative and focus on the material at hand. Are there any patterns that you can spot within the source? Who was it written by? When was it written? What can it tell you about those who wrote it? etc. etc.

Hope that helps!
Thank you so much thats incredibly helpful!
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colourtheory
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(Original post by AbbiePeasy)
Thank you so much thats incredibly helpful!
I've just realised the bit about reading won't make any sense because of a lack of context (my brain has gone to mush over the vac!) :O Basically I recommend summing up the arguments of the books you read within a sentence or two. This is essentially what you'll be asked to do for section 1
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AbbiePeasy
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(Original post by colourtheory)
I've just realised the bit about reading won't make any sense because of a lack of context (my brain has gone to mush over the vac!) :O Basically I recommend summing up the arguments of the books you read within a sentence or two. This is essentially what you'll be asked to do for section 1
Oh okay brilliant, thank you again and no worries you were more than helpful anyway.
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