Can I use particle in place of the word atom?

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Lee Chaolan
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I know subatomic particles are the most known but can I use particle in place of atom (E,g. The water particle will gain enough energy to start breaking its bonds with other particles, It then evaporates).
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username457532
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(Original post by Sugoi_Sugoi)
I know subatomic particles are the most known but can I use particle in place of atom (E,g. The water particle will gain enough energy to start breaking its bonds with other particles, It then evaporates).
Why would you not use 'atom'? Not only does it actually make you sound like you know what you're talking about, it's HALF the number of letters.
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Maker
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Yes if you want to fail your exams.

I look forward to the particle bomb and the particulate power station.
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thecatwithnohat
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Atom is a keyword
Keywords gain you more marks

Do with my comment what you will
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Dave1999
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Wouldn't water be a molecule rather than an atom anyway?
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Maker
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(Original post by Dave1999)
Wouldn't water be a molecule rather than an atom anyway?
Not according to the OP, its a water particle!
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gijops
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(Original post by Sugoi_Sugoi)
I know subatomic particles are the most known but can I use particle in place of atom (E,g. The water particle will gain enough energy to start breaking its bonds with other particles, It then evaporates).
In that case, i think it would be wrong to use atom actually... atom is only for when theres one nucleus surrounded by electrons

If I'm wrong your still OK to use particle because all atoms are particles but not all particles are atoms... been a while since my A-level chemistry
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A level sufferer
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Why would you even do that if you could (Which you cant)
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zalo_00
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The particles must ensemble to form an atom. So it wouldn't be fine unless you are using it in a context of analogy.
It's incorrect.
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Plagioclase
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(Original post by Sugoi_Sugoi)
I know subatomic particles are the most known but can I use particle in place of atom (E,g. The water particle will gain enough energy to start breaking its bonds with other particles, It then evaporates).
Depends on the question. If it's a generic question about kinetics or thermodynamics where the actual chemistry is of lesser relevance then possibly although you probably want to avoid it (you're more likely to use the word particle in a physics exam, probably). If the actual chemistry of the particles in question are important, then absolutely not. Definitely do not say "water particles" though, because that's wrong. You want to say "water molecules" instead, because that's what they are.
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04MR17
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(Original post by Sugoi_Sugoi)
I know subatomic particles are the most known but can I use particle in place of atom (E,g. The water particle will gain enough energy to start breaking its bonds with other particles, It then evaporates).
More than one atom (H20 is three) is a molecule.
(Original post by Dave1999)
Wouldn't water be a molecule rather than an atom anyway?
Correct.
Disscussion ended.
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Infraspecies
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Not if you're going to describe things with any level of detail, no.
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alow
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In that context the proper word to use would probable be molecule, as you're talking about a chemical process, although depending on how you write it particle could also be correct.

For more physical stuff particle is fine (e.g. talking about Brownian motion or distro' of velocity of particles in a gas). Most of these responses seem to come from people who've done A Level chemistry and think they know everything, unfortunately they're sorely mistaken.
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