Edexcel GCSE maths higher (8 June) Watch

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vinz
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#21
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#21
(Original post by GQz)
for the transformation i just said that the Y values had been multiplied by whatever-it-was...3 was it? And the X values had been halved, so the graph went twice as fast. Yes the Proof question was SAS, one side was common to both and two tangeants make an isos triangle from what i can remember? I read somewhere today that Edexcel totally messed up the marking of papers last year, made lots of errors when adding up so i don't think it's computerised - surely no computer would be intelligent enough to give method marks and follow asterix corrections?!
they wont be marked by the computers, i've heard they're simply scanned and then they can be marked online by markers. reduces their paper load i guess and confusion, i could be wrong.

and ffs, i got aas for that proof. god damn easy marks thrown away, just when i need them :/
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Fiona_smimms
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#22
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[QUOTE=FSHero]Eassssssssssssssssssssy!

(just kidding! Please don't kill / spam / hack me!)

That was, admittedly, hard. omg, did anyone get the answer to the 5-mark probability question? I got stuck on that one real bad... However, I got the 2x² - 35x + 98 = (2x - 7)(x - 14). What the hell does that have to do with 4/9?!?

... ]

There are ‘n + 7’ tennis balls in a bag.

Of them ‘n’ are yellow and 7 are white.

Given that the probability of picking one of each is 4/9, prove that 2n^2 - 35n + 98 = 0.

P (one of each) = (yellow,white) + (white,yellow)
4/9 = (n / n + 7)(7 / n + 7) + (7 / n + 7)(n / n + 7)
4/9 = 2 (n / n + 7)( 7 / n + 7)
4/9 = 2 (7n / n^2 + 14n + 49)
4/9 = 14n / n^2 + 14n + 49
4/9 = 14n / n^2 + 14n + 49
14n = 4/9 (n^2 + 14n + 49)
14n = 4n^2 + 56n + 196 / 9
126n = 4n^2 + 56n + 196
4n^2 – 70n + 196 = 0
2n^2 – 35n + 98 = 0
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clairezay
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#23
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I wouldn't worry about it, apparantly all the maths grade boundaries are getting dropped this year, I know that's the case for AQA, I don't know about excel. But don't worry about it, just try and bring your marks up on the next paper.

I haven't spoken to anybody who found it easy yet, lol. <3 Good luck <3
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yusufu
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#24
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#24
(Original post by clairezay)
I wouldn't worry about it, apparantly all the maths grade boundaries are getting dropped this year, I know that's the case for AQA, I don't know about excel. But don't worry about it, just try and bring your marks up on the next paper.

I haven't spoken to anybody who found it easy yet, lol. <3 Good luck <3
most of the aqa paper was easy. but there were two questions which were HARD. the graph one to find the formula (find b and c) and the proving teh odd number squared one.
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xavier2k3
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i go to kind edwards school, birmingham. Everyone in the year found it extremely difficult and we're supposed to be some of the brightest pupils in the country, so i wouldn't worry about it people! I heard a rumor that it will be 35% for a b grade!

regards
--marty
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FSHero
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[QUOTE=Fiona_smimms]
(Original post by FSHero)
Eassssssssssssssssssssy!

(just kidding! Please don't kill / spam / hack me!)

That was, admittedly, hard. omg, did anyone get the answer to the 5-mark probability question? I got stuck on that one real bad... However, I got the 2x² - 35x + 98 = (2x - 7)(x - 14). What the hell does that have to do with 4/9?!?

... ]

There are ‘n + 7’ tennis balls in a bag.

Of them ‘n’ are yellow and 7 are white.

Given that the probability of picking one of each is 4/9, prove that 2n^2 - 35n + 98 = 0.

P (one of each) = (yellow,white) + (white,yellow)
4/9 = (n / n + 7)(7 / n + 7) + (7 / n + 7)(n / n + 7)
4/9 = 2 (n / n + 7)( 7 / n + 7)
4/9 = 2 (7n / n^2 + 14n + 49)
4/9 = 14n / n^2 + 14n + 49
4/9 = 14n / n^2 + 14n + 49
14n = 4/9 (n^2 + 14n + 49)
14n = 4n^2 + 56n + 196 / 9
126n = 4n^2 + 56n + 196
4n^2 – 70n + 196 = 0
2n^2 – 35n + 98 = 0

omg - Thank you so much! I see now! You must be some kind of super-genius... I respect you lol :-)

But also, I'm a n00b (!) - what's the difference between P1 and S1 and whatever other acronyms they use around this place?
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yusufu
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#27
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(Original post by FSHero)
omg - Thank you so much! I see now! You must be some kind of super-genius... I respect you lol :-)

But also, I'm a n00b (!) - what's the difference between P1 and S1 and whatever other acronyms they use around this place?
p1 is the pure maths module 1. p2= pure module 2. etc
s1 is statistics module 1. s2 is statistics module 2. etc
m1 is mechanics module 1. etc
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