Finding another dentist near me...dental concerns and anxiety

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Anonymous #1
#1
Report Thread starter 5 years ago
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Hi,

Recently ive had a rough time of it. I have been stressed about my mental health, as well as my dental health.

My mental health worries aren't solely related to this; but they contribute to my problems. I.e. lack of proper hygiene, lethargy and alcoholism.

I am enrolled with a dental surgery currently, that provide both private and NHS treatment, however, I was supposed to ring them to reschedule an appointment 3.4 months ago, because my dentist was away.

Obviously, me being me, I avoided it because I've always found the thought of the dentists exacerbates my mental illness. I am anxious of having the dentist prod and poke my mouth, I am scared of drills, partly due to bad past experiences. I know this is common among NHS treatment!

Also, I guess I never really looked after my teeth for a period in my childhood. I've drank pop for the last 15 years of my life, more recently alcohol, and as digusting as it seems, I never always regularly kept up good practise (brushing), and I've flossed about 5-6 times in my life.

Due to this, my teeth are stained, I have almost a mouth of fillings, had one root canal surgery- my teeth are constantly sensitive, to hot and cold, and my gums are always swollen or hurt/bleed. I've noticed my teeth have moved over the years, and are somewhat wobbly in areas (or maybe its my mind).

Understandably this is highly embarrassing, and my trips to dentists have always been hostile, swift and mute. I generally just keep quiet in the chair as they prod me, because I'm embarrassed to admit my laziness in my health. Plus, the anxiety makes me feel guilty, and the more I dont say anything the more anxious I get.

I can't even ring to make the appt to ask if im still on their books. I dont even want to show my face to my current dentist, it would be easier to move but, there are limited surgeries taking NHS patients in my area.

Of all the ones that do, they have bad reviews. Citing rude staff, inconsideration, negligence, painful treatment and just horrible stuff. I've been searching NHS direct site all day, looking for a surgery with good reviews, but their all mixed. :/ Makes me feel even more fearful of going- seeing some real horror stories.

What can I do in this situation? How can I explain myself to my current practise? I feel I may have gum disease or rotting teeth.

Anyone know of any dentists in the North Yorkshire area (near Scarborough/Whitby) that are good and accept NHS patients?
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Anonymous #1
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Report Thread starter 5 years ago
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Thread starter here:

Also, I feel doubly guilty because my dentist used to be (at first) very accommodating, and was sensitive to my needs. Having given me a filling here and there for free/waived the charge.

Also, I've had the odd reduction here and there, but last time she seemed less empathic to me. I guess because she saw yet another decline in my teeth.

Problem is, its as much a mental health issue as it is inconsistency of routine.

How do I stop feeling guilty?
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Paisley99
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(Original post by Anonymous)
Thread starter here:

Also, I feel doubly guilty because my dentist used to be (at first) very accommodating, and was sensitive to my needs. Having given me a filling here and there for free/waived the charge.

Also, I've had the odd reduction here and there, but last time she seemed less empathic to me. I guess because she saw yet another decline in my teeth.

Problem is, its as much a mental health issue as it is inconsistency of routine.

How do I stop feeling guilty?
Lets keep things simple. You need to start now to save your teeth.
1. Floss. Trust me it makes a difference.
Go buy some.
Is there a GOOD reason you can't floss? Solve that problem then. But flossing is not hard...

2. Stop or reduce your fizzy drink and alcohol intake and cut down sugar.

3. Brush your teeth with a fluoride free toothpaste. Fluoride is nasty for your teeth...google it.
Go buy some.

4. Make a dentist appointment....think it through....you'll manage. Explain your anxiety...tell your mum to explain the problem....

These steps will help save your teeth.You'll have to manage the steps on your own somehow. Sorry this is all the help I can give....
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Another
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Are you on any medication right now? If not, then simply brushing your teeth religiously should get rid of most of the swollen + bleeding gums problem like magic. Since your teeth have been moving around as well (are you missing any?) Then flossing becomes very important to you also. The best thing you can do for yourself is to get brushing, and try and cut down on those fizzy drinks - no clue why the above poster is recommending a fluoride free toothpaste. I mean sure, go for it, if you want the remainder of your teeth to fall out, otherwise you need the fluoride to strengthen them

You can buy toothpastes specifically for sensitive teeth, like Sensodyme, Oral B Pro Expert, and the like. Sensodyme for me personally worked a treat

I can understand that it can be pretty difficult to break habits that have lasted for years, but believe me when I say just small acts like brushing your teeth daily can improve your self esteem. NHS dentists around the country are pretty high strung due to the work load, so they often can't give the level of care and empathy to patients that they would like to. And unfortunately, this is also how the horror stories come up - for those of us who can't afford private dentistry, I'm not quite sure how to escape this trap tbh.

I have no clue what your mental health issues are, but maybe a counsellor would help in your position? Or a very supportive family member/friend. If none of those are available, the guys down at the TSR Mental Health Society are very friendly as a last resort :lol: If you explain your anxiety before a dental visit, I'm sure the dentist will be very understanding
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Paisley99
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(Original post by Another)
Are you on any medication right now? If not, then simply brushing your teeth religiously should get rid of most of the swollen + bleeding gums problem like magic. Since your teeth have been moving around as well (are you missing any?) Then flossing becomes very important to you also. The best thing you can do for yourself is to get brushing, and try and cut down on those fizzy drinks - no clue why the above poster is recommending a fluoride free toothpaste. I mean sure, go for it, if you want the remainder of your teeth to fall out, otherwise you need the fluoride to strengthen them

You can buy toothpastes specifically for sensitive teeth, like Sensodyme, Oral B Pro Expert, and the like. Sensodyme for me personally worked a treat

I can understand that it can be pretty difficult to break habits that have lasted for years, but believe me when I say just small acts like brushing your teeth daily can improve your self esteem. NHS dentists around the country are pretty high strung due to the work load, so they often can't give the level of care and empathy to patients that they would like to. And unfortunately, this is also how the horror stories come up - for those of us who can't afford private dentistry, I'm not quite sure how to escape this trap tbh.

I have no clue what your mental health issues are, but maybe a counsellor would help in your position? Or a very supportive family member/friend. If none of those are available, the guys down at the TSR Mental Health Society are very friendly as a last resort :lol: If you explain your anxiety before a dental visit, I'm sure the dentist will be very understanding
I use fluoride free toothpaste and my teeth are great. If you researched it you'd understand...
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Another
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(Original post by Paisley99)
I use fluoride free toothpaste and my teeth are great. If you researched it you'd understand...
I'd be very interested what your teeth look like at 45 years old+... that is, if you still have them. Some people can get away with terrible oral hygiene up until the age of 25, and still have perfect teeth, but it always catches up with them later.

Either that or you're brushing immaculately. In which case, good job! But for someone who's supposedly had a less than perfect dental record for the past 15 years, I'd recommend fluoride.

I'd also be interested to know which "research" supports fluoride free toothpaste, which wasn't written by an angry american woman with no scientific background. Seriously, I've been looking for months, if you could link one I'd be grateful
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Anonymous #1
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(Original post by Another)
Are you on any medication right now? If not, then simply brushing your teeth religiously should get rid of most of the swollen + bleeding gums problem like magic. Since your teeth have been moving around as well (are you missing any?) Then flossing becomes very important to you also. The best thing you can do for yourself is to get brushing, and try and cut down on those fizzy drinks - no clue why the above poster is recommending a fluoride free toothpaste. I mean sure, go for it, if you want the remainder of your teeth to fall out, otherwise you need the fluoride to strengthen them

You can buy toothpastes specifically for sensitive teeth, like Sensodyme, Oral B Pro Expert, and the like. Sensodyme for me personally worked a treat

I can understand that it can be pretty difficult to break habits that have lasted for years, but believe me when I say just small acts like brushing your teeth daily can improve your self esteem. NHS dentists around the country are pretty high strung due to the work load, so they often can't give the level of care and empathy to patients that they would like to. And unfortunately, this is also how the horror stories come up - for those of us who can't afford private dentistry, I'm not quite sure how to escape this trap tbh.

I have no clue what your mental health issues are, but maybe a counsellor would help in your position? Or a very supportive family member/friend. If none of those are available, the guys down at the TSR Mental Health Society are very friendly as a last resort :lol: If you explain your anxiety before a dental visit, I'm sure the dentist will be very understanding
Not on medication right now, although have been on and off for years. I suspect I may have like the early to mid stages of Gum Disease- though I don't know until I go to dentist.

Not missing any teeth, although one of them was so eroded it is near my gum line (its not a front tooth so its fine), I had to have like so much of the tooth drilled away, and cleaned and then 'root canal' treatment, as there was some nerve damage. At the moment its sort of grinded down in my mouth with a filling. Sorry for too much info.

It has gotten to the point where, I can feel like 'notches' where my gum line meets the tooth, and as i understand this could be the early stages of my gums receding.

Yes, it is hard to break habits, I mostly fear the dentist been really blunt with me, because it will embarrass me- but I also have like a fear of drills. I hate the sound, the smell it creates, and the feel of the drill against the enamel on my tooth. Even with injections, i can still feel the metal on the tooth, and the vibrations are excruciatingly painful- its like it rocks my core.

Whats worse, one time my dentist gave me one shot of local anaesthetic for one side of my mouth to fill in one. But she didnt give me a shot for the other, and claimed it'd be pain free. She was wrong! It hurt like hell, not as much as I'd expected, but the drilling hurt, and the vibration and the metallic feel against my tooth. Like clanging... [shivers]. i've never felt so much fear as that day, sat in that chair having had no numbing in that tooth, and she went crazy with the drill.

Somehow, I managed to keep modest, whilst being in agony.

Plus, she was very slap dash, couldn't understand her English well, and didn't have a good bedside manner, that was enough to put me off...

Also, the dentist knows I suffer mental health issues...I had to fill out a checklist, and I stated I was highly embarrassed at my situation of my teeth. I mentioned that I was depressed and extremely anxious of dentists. [this was shortly after dropping out of university- I was a wreck!].

Regarding my mental health, I have emotional problems, anxiety and bouts of depression, low self esteem. So in general, I feel **** 90% of time.
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Another
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(Original post by Anonymous)
Not on medication right now, although have been on and off for years. I suspect I may have like the early to mid stages of Gum Disease- though I don't know until I go to dentist.

Not missing any teeth, although one of them was so eroded it is near my gum line (its not a front tooth so its fine), I had to have like so much of the tooth drilled away, and cleaned and then 'root canal' treatment, as there was some nerve damage. At the moment its sort of grinded down in my mouth with a filling. Sorry for too much info.

It has gotten to the point where, I can feel like 'notches' where my gum line meets the tooth, and as i understand this could be the early stages of my gums receding.

Yes, it is hard to break habits, I mostly fear the dentist been really blunt with me, because it will embarrass me- but I also have like a fear of drills. I hate the sound, the smell it creates, and the feel of the drill against the enamel on my tooth. Even with injections, i can still feel the metal on the tooth, and the vibrations are excruciatingly painful- its like it rocks my core.

Whats worse, one time my dentist gave me one shot of local anaesthetic for one side of my mouth to fill in one. But she didnt give me a shot for the other, and claimed it'd be pain free. She was wrong! It hurt like hell, not as much as I'd expected, but the drilling hurt, and the vibration and the metallic feel against my tooth. Like clanging... [shivers]. i've never felt so much fear as that day, sat in that chair having had no numbing in that tooth, and she went crazy with the drill.

Somehow, I managed to keep modest, whilst being in agony.

Plus, she was very slap dash, couldn't understand her English well, and didn't have a good bedside manner, that was enough to put me off...

Also, the dentist knows I suffer mental health issues...I had to fill out a checklist, and I stated I was highly embarrassed at my situation of my teeth. I mentioned that I was depressed and extremely anxious of dentists. [this was shortly after dropping out of university- I was a wreck!].

Regarding my mental health, I have emotional problems, anxiety and bouts of depression, low self esteem. So in general, I feel **** 90% of time.
If your gums are constantly sore, red and bleeding, you have (maybe) slightly wobbly teeth, and they've been moving a fair bit in the mouth - especially since none of them are missing - I do fear you're at a more advanced stage of gum disease. I can't exactly speculate at the other end of the computer screen, but it's something your dentist should be able to tell you. Your dentist will tell you as much information as you're willing to know, so if you've been cold and hostile beforehand you might not be getting as much out of your visits as you could have been. Maybe even showing an interest in your mouth might make your dentist's day, you never know.

It's pretty weird that you've had a tooth eroded so much that it's near the gum line, got a root canal on it... then the dentist just left it alone as it is. Welp, that's the NHS for you :lol:

Lots of people hate the drill, so you're not the only one! It might help to associate the sound of it with something else, like a race car or washing machine, to ease the anxiety a little. Think of the vibrations as a bumpy rollercoaster ride. Nervousness/Anxiety has been proven to make pain feel 10x worse than it originally was (Well. Not ten times, but a considerable amount) so calming your nerves before the appointment can improve your experience
Usually drilling only into enamel doesn't hurt. But I can see how a lot of vibrations on a teeth surrounded by sore gums could be quite painful (Unless this is a deep filling we're talking about. In which case, your dentist was just being evil.) I salute you for sitting through that, but next time kick up a fuss for another bit of anaesthetic!

Sorry to hear about that! I have zero experience with mental health, but I'm sure a professional can help you out. Chin up.

(I was meant to reply a whole lot earlier, but I fell asleep. My bad.)
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