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shreya kc
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whats a better school for medicine
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spiritless98
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They're both good


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Rhetorical Hips
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(Original post by shreya kc)
whats a better school for medicine
(Original post by spiritless98)
They're both good
They're both **** m8
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16Characters....
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Do you want to be a practicing doctor? If so neither apparently.
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troubadour.
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Medicine at Oxford and Cambridge is quite similar in that, unlike a lot of other medical schools in the UK, they've both retained a two-stage medical course where the first three years are pre-clinical years where you learn about the scientific basis of medicine, earning a BA in Clinical Sciences (or something like that) and then the next three years are clinical years with patient contact. The main points to note, I think, are:

1. Cambridge lets you do anything you like in the third year regardless of whether it's related to medicine. Oxford, on the other hand, often makes its students do a research project in the third year.

2. They both have competitive entry to the clinical stage so that not everybody who gets into medicine at either of these institutions is guaranteed to stay for the full six years. Rhetorical Hips, who starts medicine at Cambridge this year, has said elsewhere that this policy is being reconsidered by Cambridge and possibly by Oxford so bear that in mind. Generally if an Oxbridge student doesn't make it to the clinical stage at their university, they tend to go for universities in London, which often have special arrangements for Oxbridge students in this situation (Imperial, at least, makes special reference to them on its website).

Beyond that, it's your preference. Generally speaking it's better to apply to your strengths. Unless you've got straight A*s at both GCSE and A-level with impressive extracurriculars, the choice will usually be obvious (e.g. if you have strong GCSE results but your AS UMS isn't that great, then Oxford is the obvious choice; if the other way around, then Cambridge).
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Rhetorical Hips
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(Original post by Hydeman)
Medicine at Oxford and Cambridge is quite similar in that, unlike a lot of other medical schools in the UK, they've both retained a two-stage medical course where the first three years are pre-clinical years where you learn about the scientific basis of medicine, earning a BA in Clinical Sciences (or something like that) and then the next three years are clinical years with patient contact. The main points to note, I think, are:

1. Cambridge lets you do anything you like in the third year regardless of whether it's related to medicine. Oxford, on the other hand, often makes its students do a research project in the third year.

2. They both have competitive entry to the clinical stage so that not everybody who gets into medicine at either of these institutions is guaranteed to stay for the full six years. Rhetorical Hips, who starts medicine at Cambridge this year, has said elsewhere that this policy is being reconsidered by Cambridge and possibly by Oxford so bear that in mind. Generally if an Oxbridge student doesn't make it to the clinical stage at their university, they tend to go for universities in London, which often have special arrangements for Oxbridge students in this situation (Imperial, at least, makes special reference to them on its website).

Beyond that, it's your preference. Generally speaking it's better to apply to your strengths. Unless you've got straight A*s at both GCSE and A-level with impressive extracurriculars, the choice will usually be obvious (e.g. if you have strong GCSE results but your AS UMS isn't that great, then Oxford is the obvious choice; if the other way around, then Cambridge).
Pretty much the above. They're both good, are pretty distinct from other medical schools if you're looking at teaching style, and have a lot in common.

I would add that Cambridge still do dissections whilst Oxford has switched to prosection to teach anatomy. Whether that makes one better than the other depends on which style of teaching anatomy you think is better. Anatomy teaching is probably of more importance to those looking to become surgeons anyway (not me!).

Also I'm pretty certain that Cambridge is backing out of the 'having to reapply to clinical school during third year' thing. That's what I was told at Cambridge, and there's even articles written by UCL students discussing what it means for the rest of the medical schools (Oxford, UCL, Imperial, Kings, St Mary's [Barts]). I believe that it is the year above me (class of 2014) that will be to first to not have to reapply. I hope I'm not wrong, that was one of the reasons I applied to Cambridge over Oxford! And yes I've heard that Oxford may be backing out too - I don't think the London universities are very happy with this!

That said, you can still transfer - Cambridge are simply making it so that reapplying is not compulsory, so that if you want to stay you don't have to worry about potentially being rejected and having to switch universities. If you want to transfer you can still ask, but whether it will be more difficult to do so than in the past I don't know however.
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troubadour.
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(Original post by Rhetorical Hips)
I would add that Cambridge still do dissections whilst Oxford has switched to prosection to teach anatomy. Whether that makes one better than the other depends on which style of teaching anatomy you think is better. Anatomy teaching is probably of more importance to those looking to become surgeons anyway (not me!).
Damn it, I always forget that bit! Thanks for adding it.
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Cambridge is a much bigger med school (300 per year vs 150). Cambridge focuses on anatomy more, whereas Oxford do more physiology.

And to clarify, Cambridge have already stopped transfers, its a done deal. I think I recall applications dropping in light of this this year, presumably as many applicants liked the idea of doing pre-clinical in Cambridge and clinical in London. You could have your pick of UCL, Imperial, Kings... it was not totally unpopular.

Oxford does not have any plans to scrap transfers that I am aware of.

(Original post by Rhetorical Hips)
If you want to transfer you can still ask, but whether it will be more difficult to do so than in the past I don't know however.
It will undoubtedly be more difficult. The whole reason they wanted to switch was because London were making demands of the Cambridge curriculum as a condition to accepting transfers, something which Cambridge is now not adhering to.
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The Medic Portal
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(Original post by shreya kc)
whats a better school for medicine
Hi Shreya

The important thing to note is that both are very science heavy for the first years, with less patient exposure than other schools. Make sure this is what you want before you apply!

More on Oxbridge course structure here:

https://www.themedicportal.com/appli...ional-courses/

The Medic Portal
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shreya kc
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whats a practicing doctor???
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nexttime
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(Original post by shreya kc)
whats a practicing doctor???
A doctor "practices" medicine. Its just the verb you use.

He was being facetious based on Oxbridge's focus on basic science rather than true 'medicine' in the early years. In reality Oxbridge graduates have by far the best performance in doctor's exams after graduation e.g. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24742473
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