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Dad Lost His Job; I'm Thinking.. watch

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    Hey guys,

    So, recently my dad lost his job due to massive funding cuts to where he works (Library of Birmingham). He earned around 20k a year, which is quite average. He will be given 6 months payment in return for 3 months working. So we can keep on going for 6 months.

    Now, I've been thinking a lot. My dad was smart and is smart right now, as he helps me a lot with school work (and I'm one of the smartest in my school). He did attend college, but dropped out due to some personal problems. Now, since he is smart, I was thinking of trying to convince him to go to university.

    He would be a mature student at the age of 42. However, he wouldn't go for more than 2 years (if I convince him) as I would be off to college after around 2-3 years. So, a 2 year or below course would be suitable for him.

    Now, fees/funding. I have done some research, but I couldn't quite get to the point, if you know what I mean. Since he doesn't have a job, he can't pay for university nevermind us (2 children and wife).

    Also, he does like the University of Birmingham quite a lot (we live in Birmingham), and if I do manage to convince him, he may want to go the that.

    In addition, the 1-2 year courses in that university, and other universities, don't give any real good job (45k+ per year aim). He likes aircraft a lot (he and me watch a lot of documentaries on them). So maybe aerospace engineering, or some other type of engineering.

    So guys, here's some of my questions:

    1. Will he have a chance to go University despite dropping out of college before (while being very smart)?

    2. How can fees and funding be managed? Can the government pay for the tuition fees AND living costs (he would live at home) which are around 19k a year?

    3. Is there any course around 1-2 years that will be suitable for a good job?

    Thanks in advance!
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    It could be a good idea, but I think that just more than doubling his salary out of the blue aged 42 after going to uni is a bit ambitious. The answers to 1 and 3 are both almost certainly yes, but the good job won't be as an aerospace engineer and it won't pay 45k.
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    (Original post by SmashConcept)
    It could be a good idea, but I think that just more than doubling his salary out of the blue aged 42 after going to uni is a bit ambitious. The answers to 1 and 3 are both almost certainly yes, but the good job won't be as an aerospace engineer and it won't pay 45k.
    Yeah.. I might be thinking a little over-the-top. Maybe around 30k?
    But, what would the answer be for fees/funding?

    And for the course, what would you suggest, that could put him on the right track for a good job?
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    Don't you think he should get a job to support his family like fathers should, instead of potentially taking 3 years out of his life to study something which may not guarantee him a job? Unless of course you're well off and he doesn't need to.
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    (Original post by Danny the Geezer)
    Don't you think he should get a job to support his family like fathers should, instead of potentially taking 3 years out of his life to study something which may not guarantee him a job? Unless of course you're well off and he doesn't need to.
    That's the problem. There are no jobs which could support the family enough. His previous job could support us, but not other ones. He was a senior in his previous workplace, so he had an increased salary, may I mention.

    My mom also has a small teaching assistant job, but it's for a small nursery. And it's more part-time. She may be able to secure a proper teaching assistant job in the future for a proper school.
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    (Original post by PowerHotmail)
    That's the problem. There are no jobs which could support the family enough. His previous job could support us, but not other ones. He was a senior in his previous workplace, so he had an increased salary, may I mention.

    My mom also has a small teaching assistant job, but it's for a small nursery. And it's more part-time. She may be able to secure a proper teaching assistant job in the future for a proper school.
    No he probably "could" support his family if he budgeted-just like most people-but I guess you want to live comfortably and that's ok but tbh-you could sacrifice things in order to support a family by looking at neccessities first, luxuries later.
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    I don't think its realistic for your dad to take 2 years out of his work life to study full time unless he has a lot of savings or your mum has a well paid job and he does not have to work.

    There is a big difference between getting a job as a graduate when you are 21 and at twice that age. Employers prefer younger employees and 42 is seen as too old to start a career by a lot of employers whether its true or not.

    Your dad can always study part time or with the OU if he wants to better his qualifications.
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    (Original post by Maker)
    I don't think its realistic for your dad to take 2 years out of his work life to study full time unless he has a lot of savings or your mum has a well paid job and he does not have to work.

    There is a big difference between getting a job as a graduate when you are 21 and at twice that age. Employers prefer younger employees and 42 is seen as too old to start a career by a lot of employers whether its true or not.

    Your dad can always study part time or with the OU if he wants to better his qualifications.
    I thought 60% of undergraduates were mature students though. And that employers see those graduates more mature and experienced?

    Also, I forgot to mention something. I currently have a hobby in Game Development, and could hopefully, see myself earning some money through the completion of a few games.

    I've been also reading through this: http://www.universitiesuk.ac.uk/high...eGuide2014.pdf

    And it says that the loan gives 85% of the Childcare costs.
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    (Original post by PowerHotmail)
    I thought 60% of undergraduates were mature students though. And that employers see those graduates more mature and experienced?

    Also, I forgot to mention something. I currently have a hobby in Game Development, and could hopefully, see myself earning some money through the completion of a few games.

    I've been also reading through this: http://www.universitiesuk.ac.uk/high...eGuide2014.pdf

    And it says that the loan gives 85% of the Childcare costs.
    It would make more sense if it was a continuation of an existing career e.g. training to be a nurse if he was a health care assistant rather than from a librarian to an engineer. By the time he graduates, he will be 45 and competing with people half his age. I don't know the stats for the % of mature students.

    Employers know that his career length is at least 20 years shorter than a 21 year old and may not want to invest in a lot of training if they think he would not stick around. Plus he would find it difficult to move to different locations for jobs if he has an established family.

    He could change to say teaching or healthcare assitant where age is less of a disadvantage and jobs can be had closer to home with possible progress to teacher or nurse after more education.

    It depends if your family wants you to support them, I don't know how hard it is to make money from writing games but a family needs a consistent income.
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    (Original post by PowerHotmail)
    Hey guys,

    So, recently my dad lost his job due to massive funding cuts to where he works (Library of Birmingham). He earned around 20k a year, which is quite average. He will be given 6 months payment in return for 3 months working. So we can keep on going for 6 months.

    Now, I've been thinking a lot. My dad was smart and is smart right now, as he helps me a lot with school work (and I'm one of the smartest in my school). He did attend college, but dropped out due to some personal problems. Now, since he is smart, I was thinking of trying to convince him to go to university.

    He would be a mature student at the age of 42. However, he wouldn't go for more than 2 years (if I convince him) as I would be off to college after around 2-3 years. So, a 2 year or below course would be suitable for him.

    Now, fees/funding. I have done some research, but I couldn't quite get to the point, if you know what I mean. Since he doesn't have a job, he can't pay for university nevermind us (2 children and wife).

    Also, he does like the University of Birmingham quite a lot (we live in Birmingham), and if I do manage to convince him, he may want to go the that.

    In addition, the 1-2 year courses in that university, and other universities, don't give any real good job (45k+ per year aim). He likes aircraft a lot (he and me watch a lot of documentaries on them). So maybe aerospace engineering, or some other type of engineering.

    So guys, here's some of my questions:

    1. Will he have a chance to go University despite dropping out of college before (while being very smart)?

    2. How can fees and funding be managed? Can the government pay for the tuition fees AND living costs (he would live at home) which are around 19k a year?

    3. Is there any course around 1-2 years that will be suitable for a good job?

    Thanks in advance!
    You need to do some research into courses which might help him get a better job if that's what he wants to do.

    Firstly if he's been out of education he'll need to do some kind of further education course to get up to speed for uni, especially if he's thinking about Birmingham, a university who often don't accept Access courses either.

    Secondly he'll need 3 years to complete his degree if he's to seriously think about that £45k graduate job.

    Student loans will cover some costs but certainly not up to £19,000 per year.

    It's a long haul thing going off to uni, but if he has his mind and heart set on it then great, if not it's probably best he waits until your family is a little more economically stable and/or pursue some studies with the OU.
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    (Original post by Maker)
    It would make more sense if it was a continuation of an existing career e.g. training to be a nurse if he was a health care assistant rather than from a librarian to an engineer. By the time he graduates, he will be 45 and competing with people half his age. I don't know the stats for the % of mature students.

    Employers know that his career length is at least 20 years shorter than a 21 year old and may not want to invest in a lot of training if they think he would not stick around. Plus he would find it difficult to move to different locations for jobs if he has an established family.

    He could change to say teaching or healthcare assitant where age is less of a disadvantage and jobs can be had closer to home with possible progress to teacher or nurse after more education.

    It depends if your family wants you to support them, I don't know how hard it is to make money from writing games but a family needs a consistent income.
    I'm actually near-completion of a game, and it may bring around ££££'s. So, it could keep us going for maybe 6 months (I would release more games within those 6 months too). My mom has chances of working at the local school, rather than the small nursery. And that would be a "consistant" income.

    I just want the best for my dad really. He has 2 brothers, a urologist and engineer. And don't really want him left in the dust. (He was the smarter one when they were in school, but personal issues caused him to not pursue further education like his brothers).

    Maybe librarian to engineer is a bit too much maybe. Teaching/Healthcare is not really his "thing". Maybe a mathematics/accounting degree as he was exposed to a little bittle of financing during his previous work.

    Also, since me and my brother go to school, him going to a morning lecture and whatever else he needs to do won't really do any harm as, well, we're in school.
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    (Original post by SuperCat007)
    You need to do some research into courses which might help him get a better job if that's what he wants to do.

    Firstly if he's been out of education he'll need to do some kind of further education course to get up to speed for uni, especially if he's thinking about Birmingham, a university who often don't accept Access courses either.

    Secondly he'll need 3 years to complete his degree if he's to seriously think about that £45k graduate job.

    Student loans will cover some costs but certainly not up to £19,000 per year.

    It's a long haul thing going off to uni, but if he has his mind and heart set on it then great, if not it's probably best he waits until your family is a little more economically stable and/or pursue some studies with the OU.
    Yeah, the OU might be more suitable.

    His mind is set on construction/building on our home right now, like every day he goes out to the garden to make a patio at the back. He made pretty much most of the things in the garden (it used to be a massive jungle, now it has a nice patio, paths, new fences, etc). That's why I thought Engineering would be suitable for him.

    It's unlucky that the student loan won't cover 19k a year, but how close would it get?

    Also, if we combine the maintence loan and grant with the childcare (since he would live at home), that would surely be enough?

    Also, would "Distance learning" be a good option for him?
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    The OU makes more sense so your dad can still earn

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    (Original post by PowerHotmail)
    Yeah, the OU might be more suitable.

    His mind is set on construction/building on our home right now, like every day he goes out to the garden to make a patio at the back. He made pretty much most of the things in the garden (it used to be a massive jungle, now it has a nice patio, paths, new fences, etc). That's why I thought Engineering would be suitable for him.

    It's unlucky that the student loan won't cover 19k a year, but how close would it get?

    Also, if we combine the maintence loan and grant with the childcare (since he would live at home), that would surely be enough?

    Also, would "Distance learning" be a good option for him?
    Your dad would be much better off studying part-time with the OU. they also offer a full BSc in Engineering, so whilst he would be qualified in 6 years, at least he doesn't need any A levels, and plus, he could still find a part time job somewhere to help cover those costs + family costs. Distance learning looks liek a good option for him.

    How old are you? Have you considered getting a part time job yourself to help out with the finance?
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    (Original post by Killerpenguin15)
    Your dad would be much better off studying part-time with the OU. they also offer a full BSc in Engineering, so whilst he would be qualified in 6 years, at least he doesn't need any A levels, and plus, he could still find a part time job somewhere to help cover those costs + family costs. Distance learning looks liek a good option for him.

    How old are you? Have you considered getting a part time job yourself to help out with the finance?
    I'm 13. As I said, I'm diving into Game Development which will bring ££££'s (hopefully).
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    (Original post by PowerHotmail)
    ..........
    You need to start writing down the various options, and be realistic about when they need to be crossed out and when you should do more investigation.

    Your Dad may be bright, but that isn't the end of the problem.

    Lets say he has one professional skill set - librarian, and a couple of decent hobby skills - carpentry and decorating (I'm just guessing).

    Without dropping back to an entry level salary - he isn't going to be able to make a massive professional change such as aerospace engineering. So he almost certainly needs to find a path that builds on what skills he already has.

    Additional education is a possibility because he is bright - and both universities and employers like mature students/graduates who have often made well informed and highly motivated decisions about their future - just like your Dad.

    Going back to uni and getting an undergrad degree, in say librarianship, would take 3 years and your Dad probably couldn't earn much during that time to support the family. But maybe the whole family could decide to suck it up and make the change. However, pay and opportunities in librarianship, or archives, museums etc are very competitive and not massively well paid, £45k wouldn't happen straight away.

    Alternatively, he could study with the OU, or College courses - there are many ways into and levels of accounting qualification for example, which would be well supported by the administrative skills of library work in any future job hunt.

    In the mean time, perhaps he could pay some of his redundancy money to get a few formal plumbing, building, decorating, carpentry qualifications and see if he can get taken on as a handyman/labourer in the building trade. Or even set up as a self-employed handyman - painting, making flat pack furniture, putting up fencing etc for people. During that time he could probably do all the self-study he needs for an OU degree or AAT quals etc. At the end he'd also have contacts in a range of businesses where he could either work in properties or in back office administration.
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    (Original post by Killerpenguin15)
    Your dad would be much better off studying part-time with the OU. they also offer a full BSc in Engineering, so whilst he would be qualified in 6 years, at least he doesn't need any A levels, and plus, he could still find a part time job somewhere to help cover those costs + family costs. Distance learning looks liek a good option for him.

    How old are you? Have you considered getting a part time job yourself to help out with the finance?
    I'm a little puzzles on how the OU works. With the distance learning thing.

    Is it like, there's lectures at specific times, and they stream it and my dad watches it on a computer? Or are they pre-recorded and my dad can watch them any time?

    And, what about practicals? Wouldn't he need to go to a lab for that?

    One final thing, when he does finish the course and gets his degree, is there any ceremony he goes to?
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    I don;t want to cause offence to you, as I am sure you have your families best intentions at heart, but you should trust that your dad understands life enough to be able to make the best decision for himself, for you and for your family.
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    (Original post by PowerHotmail)
    I'm 13. As I said, I'm diving into Game Development which will bring ££££'s (hopefully).
    Its great that you want to go into games development However as someone aspiring to work in the same field, DO NOT go in it for the money, you will just flop and fail unless your heart really is in Games development.

    EDIT: Just saw your recent post.
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    (Original post by PowerHotmail)

    1. Will he have a chance to go University despite dropping out of college before (while being very smart)?

    2. How can fees and funding be managed? Can the government pay for the tuition fees AND living costs (he would live at home) which are around 19k a year?

    3. Is there any course around 1-2 years that will be suitable for a good job?
    I think further education might be a good idea, but I don't think a full time course at the University of Birmingham would be suitable. The government's loan simply would notbe even close to £19,000, which is the main issue, and also he might not meet the entry requirements for the university. You say he dropped out of college - do you mean he dropped out of sixth form college, so he doesn't have any A levels/equivalent? If that's the case then I doubt he'd get in, unfortunately. If you mean a full university when you say college, and he does have A levels/equivalent, then it might be fine.

    As others have suggested, OU is the way to go. Distance learning seems far more suitable, and while it could take longer, he could easily have a part-time job as well.
 
 
 
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