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Maths Homework help watch

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    Help on (D) (d) and (C) (a)
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    Im just stuck on questions because i don't know what 2x^2+4x^2 is... and also how to do 9^7/2
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    (Original post by TheAlphaParticle)
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    Help on (D) (d) and (C) (a)
    Hi there,

    I see that you have managed to do part B (c) correctly (on the very top of the first image). The same principle applies to part C(a) with the x squared's.

    For part D(d), 9^(7/2), can you write it out in a different way? I would deal with that by firstly doing 9^(1/2), then whatever you get for that you raise to the power of 7, e.g:
    9^(1/2) = x (where you have to find that out)
    then x^7 = your answer. See if that helps.
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    (Original post by TheAlphaParticle)
    Im just stuck on questions because i don't know what 2x^2+4x^2 is... and also how to do 9^7/2
    If you are adding terms of the same power, so an x term plus another x term or an x^2 term plus another x^2 term or whatever, you just add the coefficients (in this case 2 + 4) to give a single term of that power.

    For powers like that, you take the appropriate root (square root in this case) represented by the denominator, then you raise the resulting number to the numerator. So you essentially have the square root of 9, to the power of 7.
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    (Original post by spotify95)
    Hi there,

    I see that you have managed to do part B (c) correctly (on the very top of the first image). The same principle applies to part C(a) with the x squared's.

    For part D(d), 9^(7/2), can you write it out in a different way? I would deal with that by firstly doing 9^(1/2), then whatever you get for that you raise to the power of 7, e.g:
    9^(1/2) = x (where you have to find that out)
    then x^7 = your answer. See if that helps.
    That is what i have attempted but the question asks for it to written as a fraction
    Also I just want to know is x^2+x^2= x^4 or 2x^2
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    (Original post by TheAlphaParticle)
    That is what i have attempted but the question asks for it to written as a fraction
    Also I just want to know is x^2+x^2= x^4 or 2x^2
    Hi,

    Adding like terms doesn't increase the power - so x^2 + x^2 = 2x^2. Just like what you did on the other question: x - 7x = -6x.

    (x^2) * (x^2) would be x^4 (the star being used as a multiplication sign).

    Hope that helps; let me know if you need any further help.
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    (Original post by 13 1 20 8 42)
    If you are adding terms of the same power, so an x term plus another x term or an x^2 term plus another x^2 term or whatever, you just add the coefficients (in this case 2 + 4) to give a single term of that power.

    For powers like that, you take the appropriate root (square root in this case) represented by the denominator, then you raise the resulting number to the numerator. So you essentially have the square root of 9, to the power of 7.
    Couldn't have described it any better, thanks for that!
 
 
 
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